ND Campus Ministry to host ‘Home for the Holidays’ support group

first_imgFor many in the Notre Dame community, the holiday season is a joyful time of year and something to look forward to during the stress of finals. However, for those suffering from the recent loss of a loved one, Christmas, and all that comes with it, can sometimes bring more pain than cheer. To help those experiencing loss during the holiday season, Notre Dame’s Campus Ministry is holding a grief support group called “Home For the Holidays,” Associate director of pastoral care Tami Schmitz said.“The holidays can be particularly tough, especially if it’s the first time [someone is] celebrating without one of their family members,” she said in an email. “The purpose of the session is to remind students they are not alone and to offer some practical suggestions for facing the holidays.”Schmitz said though Campus Ministry offers a variety of grief groups throughout the year, they have never offered this specific session. “We sensed that it was something needed this year,” she said.Though this is the first year “Home for the Holidays” is being offered, Schmitz said Campus Ministry has been helping bereaved students heal for over a decade. “Our grief ministry began about 15 years ago when there was an incoming first-year student whose father was tragically killed a few days before bringing her to Notre Dame,” Schmitz said. “Jerry and Dorene Hammes, who were avid Notre Dame supporters, were friends with this family and reached out to the [Vice President] for Student Affairs at the time and generously offered to provide support for a grief support initiative. That was the catalyst that has allowed us to serve so many students over the years.”Schmitz said she hopes the session will lead to people gaining tools to make it through holiday traditions during this difficult time. “We hope those who participate will gain some ideas of how to face the holiday season without their loved one,” she said. “We know nothing we say can heal all the wounds and brokenness that death leaves behind. But we can at least be present, listen and offer support as needed.”Despite the fact that every person coping with the death of a loved one experiences grief differently, Schmitz said she hopes that those who participate can find some comfort in solidarity with the rest of the group. “The purpose of the session is to remind students they are not alone and to offer some practical suggestions for facing the holidays,” she said. “We will also have a student who lost her brother about a year ago share about the challenges and the support she has experienced these past months.  I am hoping those who come know that even though it’s an extremely difficult time, [they] will feel supported and know that they can get through it.”Though nothing can bring back the people who have died, Schmitz said there are some things that may help students to honor their loved ones who have died and cope with the loss. “Each person’s experience of grief is different so there is no ‘one size fits all’ answer,” she said. “But there are some things that may be helpful: find a way to honor your loved one at the holiday meal with a prayer, give a gift in the name of the person who died, give yourself permission to slip away and do something for you, prepare the favorite foods of your loved one and share a favorite story or memory are a few ideas.”The “Home for the Holidays” grief support group will be meeting Thursday, Nov. 29 at 7 p.m. in 301 of the Coleman-Morse Center. All students — undergraduate and graduate — are welcome to attend.Tags: Campus Ministry, home for the holidays, support grouplast_img read more

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West End Elf Star Ben Forster on Christmas Shopping and Buddy vs. The Phantom

first_imgBen Forster played Magaldi in the most recent West End revival of Evita and is poised to take over as the Phantom in London in the New Year, but through the holiday season he can be found leading the company at the Dominion Theatre of Elf, playing Buddy, which was originated onscreen in 2003 by Will Ferrell. Broadway.com caught up with the reality TV star to talk Christmas shopping, Andrew Lloyd Webber and more.Were you surprised to be offered this role in Elf?Yes, but I’m quite pleased with the way it has turned out. What’s great is that I feel free to do my own version and not have to copy Will [Ferrell] from the film or anything like that. For me, this is about doing it honestly and trusting in the humor as written and not trying to get a laugh.What’s your take on Buddy?The thing with Buddy is that he’s just a human being who was taken to the North Pole by mistake. He’s childlike, to be sure, but I almost think the comedy is funnier if he is just a normal bloke who looks as if he could actually be working in an office. In the movie, Will looks as if he could be a barrister or a doctor.And you get to wear a pretty out-there costume.I’ve got this crazily green, woolen suit, which is made of authentic wool so it’s ridiculously hot. I know a couple of the Broadway actors who played the part were a little bit bigger, but Will wasn’t big in the movie so I think this kind of works.Sounds intense!It is, but [the costume] also means I can have a rocky road ice cream between shows without feeling guilty.How’s your American accent?I think it’s all right, or let’s just say that I haven’t had any complaints. I’ve done a number of shows in the past where I’ve had dialect coaches, so I’ve spent a lot of time on the accent and because I’m from the north of England, it can be quite difficult to do a standard English accent whereas sounding American is so different that I can kind of slip into that more easily.Elf is a Christmas show. Have you ever spent Christmas in New York?No, my God, I would love to! I’ve done Christmas shopping in New York, which was lovely but it didn’t snow. I’ve always wanted to do that whole romantic thing of being there in the snow. I really love New York.Speaking of Christmas, aren’t you amazed at the volume of holiday-themed decorations and merchandise on view in London already?I think some of the shops do it from September but that’s because we get cold early; it gives us an extra license because our winters are a bit longer and a bit colder than most places in the world.Have you done your Christmas shopping for this year?Ha! I’m not a very organized person. I’ll be the one running about between shows on Christmas Eve.How do you feel about seguing directly from this to The Phantom of the Opera?That will be a welcome change! With Buddy I’m on stage for virtually the whole show with barely any time off whereas the Phantom has less stage time, but is of course hugely demanding in its own way. There’s a lot of pressure that comes from taking on that role.Have you sought advice from any previous Phantoms?Mark McKerracher who plays Santa Claus in Elf was a past Phantom and when I told him about it, he said, “You’re going to love it; the Phantom was one of my most favorite jobs I’ve ever done.” And I know John Owen Jones; I think he’ll be a big inspiration when I get into that world.What’s your particular history with Phantom?I saw it in the West End when I was 10 or 11. It was the first musical that I’d ever seen apart from amateur dramatics. I remember turning to my mum when we got back on the coach to go home and saying, “This is what I want to do.” It felt magical as a child and it’s magical as an adult, as well.What do you think Buddy would do if he were to meet the Phantom?I think he would jump on the chandelier and try to take the Phantom out! He wouldn’t just watch; he would dress as Christine and try and help out.What do you think would have happened in your own career if you hadn’t won Superstar on Britain’s ITV?The honest answer is that I probably wouldn’t be doing this anymore. I love the business and being an actor and a singer and I had had a lovely career since I was 18, but I had got to the point where I was 31 or 32 and was playing the lead in Thriller Live and yet still couldn’t get seen for Broadway shows coming to London or for a big new musical. Superstar shone a spotlight in my face and opened doors that otherwise would not have been opened.Do you think the TV show also intensified audience interest in theater?Yes, and like I say, it’s all about recruiting more interest in our business. Anything that does that is a positive. View Commentslast_img read more

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Operação Martillo – Ensaio fotográfico

first_imgBy Dialogo July 06, 2012 Navio da Guarda Costeira dos EUA participou de quatro interceptações de embarcações, inclusive uma em parceria com a Marinha da Nicarágua. Tripulante do cúter Valiant, da Guarda Costeira dos EUA, examina um contrabando interceptado em 31 de março cujo teste deu positivo para cocaína. (Cortesia da Guarda Costeira dos EUA). A Guarda Costeira dos EUA apreendeu 1.205 kgs de cocaína, no valor de US$ 32,5 milhões, num barco no Mar do Caribe em 31 de maio. (Cortesia da Guarda Costeira dos EUA) A fragata de mísseis guiados USS Nicholas colaborou com a Marinha colombiana na interceptação de uma lancha que transportava mais de US$ 59 milhões (R$ 114 milhões) em cocaína no oeste do Mar do Caribe em 6 de maio. (Cortesia da Marinha americana) Uma lancha com uma carga de 2.200 kg de cocaína foi interceptada por forças navais americanas e colombianas no oeste do Mar do Caribe em 6 de maio. (Cortesia da Marinha americana) Um semissubmersível de autopropulsão foi interceptado no oeste do Mar do Caribe em 30 de março por tripulantes dos cúters Decisive e Pea Island, da Guarda Costeira americana, e pela Marinha hondurenha. As tripulações de perseguição dos cúters americanos interceptaram a embarcação e detiveram quatro supostos contrabandistas. O semissubmersível afundou a milhares de metros d’água durante a operação. (Cortesia da Guarda Costeira dos EUA)last_img read more

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Brazil, Colombia, and Peru Reinforce Capabilities in Naval Exercise

first_imgBy Gonzalo Silva Infante/Diálogo September 26, 2018 In early September, the navies of Brazil Colombia, and Peru concluded BRACOLPER 2018, an annual, multinational naval exercise, after two months of training in the Amazon River. The exercise, in its 44th edition, began in Leticia municipality in the Colombian Amazon, continued in Iquitos, Peru; and ended in Manaus, Brazil. Hundreds of navy service members assigned to the Amazon, as well as marines and naval aviation aircraft of the three countries took part in the exercise. Brazil featured the Roraima and Raposo Tavares river patrol ships, as well as the Oswaldo Cruz hospital ship. Colombia set out with the ARC Arauca ship, while Peru deployed the BAP Castilla and BAP Clavero river gunboats. The objective of the exercise is to train personnel in combined riverine operations to fight narcotrafficking, which uses rivers and their tributaries to transport drugs. The exercise also seeks to increase forces’ capabilities to counter other illegal activities, such as illegal mining and trafficking of flora and fauna. “The BRACOLPER operation represents an effort from the Brazilian, Colombian, and Peruvian navies to maintain naval collaboration in the Amazon,” Peruvian Navy Vice Admiral Silvio Alva Villamón, commander of Amazon Operations, told Diálogo. “It evolved progressively, from basic combined riverine operation activities to procedures and doctrine developed to facilitate more complex exercises, adapting to the threats of illegal activities and expanding spaces and mechanisms for information exchange.” Interoperability BRACOLPER 2018 participants conducted landing, sailing, transit, river control, shooting, and communications exercises. In addition, units participated in rapid-response operations and tactical maneuvers, simulating scenarios featuring the most common crimes troops face. “The main scenario comprises the combined work of the three navies during river control in the Amazon basin to counter criminal action, as well as the combined marine landing and the naval fire support exercise,” Peruvian Navy Commander Roy Pino Huamán, commander of the Amazon Riverine Units Fleet, told Diálogo. “The main challenges were the river control maneuvers and rapid response exercises due to the river’s conditions—current strength, shallow waters, and weeds.” During the exercise, naval aviation teams simulated an air assault with helicopters and a counterattack response by riverine units. The exercise also evaluated crews’ capabilities in immediate response procedures. “The threats that armed forces face in the Amazon involve criminals of different kinds who travel through vast areas,” Vice Adm. Alva said. “[These threats demand] of the armed forces a high degree of collaboration, coordination, and intelligence exchange, and sometimes require direct support from neighboring countries’ armed forces to close off spaces, continue with chases, make interventions, or facilitate means for medical evacuations, among others.” The exercise is an opportunity to conduct combined training to confront common situations, and exchange knowledge and experiences that strengthen interoperability. The collaboration also reinforces ties of friendship among neighboring countries. “Participants in this process know how to keep up with the pace of integration,” Vice Adm. Alva said. “The integration and communication bridges developed at every level of command, and personnel are essential for the trust achieved and contribute every year to the great expectations of this exercise.” Uninterrupted BRACOLPER 2018 took place in three phases, including coordination meetings to hone the final details before carrying out the exercises, and debriefings. Critical evaluations not only highlighted the participants’ achievements, but also contributed beneficial ideas for the three countries—such was the case in the second phase, which focused on rapid-response exercises with marine participation. “When this phase was over, service members held a debriefing to evaluate the river control methods each navy carried out, and each navy gave a presentation about the capabilities of its marine corps,” Cmdr. Pino said. “It was recommended that we study the possibility of conducting professional exchange visits to marine detachments of participating nations.” The annual exercise is held without interruption since 1974, when the tri-border navies opted to combine their efforts to counter regional challenges. The exercise also serves as a cause for celebration, as its three phases coincide with the independence days of Colombia, July 20th; Peru, July 28th; and Brazil, September 7th. Upon completion of the exercise, the navies started to plan for BRACOLPER 2019, with teleconferences and in-person meetings. According to Vice Adm. Alva, the planning is assigned to the Brazilian Navy’s Ninth Naval District, the Colombian Navy’s Southern Naval Force, and the Peruvian Navy’s Amazon Operations Command. “We developed channels of ongoing communication at the command, operations, and intelligence levels,” Vice Adm. Alva said. “We are aware that border areas are porous, allowing for a flow of all kinds of crimes, and combined patrols, information exchanges, and mutual support [consolidate] each country’s operations.”last_img read more

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Pedestrian Fatally Struck by Truck on LIE

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A man was fatally struck by a truck when he walked into traffic on the Long Island Expressway in Melville on Sunday afternoon.Suffolk County police said the pedestrian stepped into the far right eastbound lane of Route 495 just east of exit 49 when he was hit by an Isuzu box truck at 2:05 p.m.The victim was pronounced dead at the scene. His identity was not immediately released.The truck driver, 49-year-old Humberto Maldonado of Brentwood, was not injured.Second Squad detectives impounded the truck, are continuing the investigation and ask anyone who may have witnessed the incident or have information on this crash to call them at 631-854-8252.last_img read more

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To Cure What Ails the Island’s Economy, Let’s Put New Rental Housing Where We Need It Most

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York By Ann GolobHere’s how to cure Long Island’s current economic stagnation: expand the biomedical industry and multi-family housing simultaneously.If that’s done, according to a recent report by the Long Island Index, between 44,500 and 73,000 new jobs would be created by 2040 and between $9.5 billion and $15.1 billion would be added in new gross regional product at the same time. It would be a big jolt that our region needs.To understand just how important these two changes could be, the Long Island Index looked closely at the state of rental housing on Long Island and especially whether the recent momentum in announced multifamily developments shows them taking place where the report recommends: in downtown areas and especially transit-oriented ones. It’s a crucial question because, to be most effective as an economic stimulus, the multifamily housing must offer a variety of types and costs of housing–and, in particular, a style of downtown living–that will attract the young talent that the biomedical and other high-tech industries covet. If young people don’t see attractive and affordable housing options on Long Island, there is the danger of these industries locating elsewhere.Our latest, just completed, research is not yet encouraging, but it’s extremely valuable because it further underscores where Long Island should be heading.Long Island has not always had as deep a deficiency of rental housing as it does today. In the 1960s and 1970s the building of garden apartments was brisk. In fact, 44 percent of today’s rentals were built during this 20-year period.That, however, led to a backlash and a push to tighten zoning, specify height limitations, and limit density. Rental apartment development came to an almost complete halt. In the 1980s, the availability of rental apartments was further limited by the conversion of more than 22,000 units from rentals to coops or condos, and by the expansion in the number of coop or condo units built compared to rentals. The result is the current hole of insufficient multifamily housing that is driving away not only our young people but also our seniors who would prefer to remain where they live today if they had the option.How many rental apartments does Long Island have in multifamily buildings? Today Long Island has a total of 1,500 rental apartment buildings spread across the two counties with a total of almost 88,000 apartment units.Looking forward, Long Island is planning to build more units than have been constructed in decades. Counting up projects that have been proposed, that are going through the approvals process, or are actually under construction, there are 72 rental projects, which could add another 21,425 apartment units to our region. But before we break open the champagne bottles to celebrate a brighter future, consider that 78 percent of these projects are still in the proposal stage and, even if they do get built, many are not located where they are needed most.Examining data on the rental buildings in the two counties now, the Long Island Index geocoded their locations and determined how many are situated within half a mile of a downtown center–near transit, restaurants and other amenities. For the two counties combined, almost half of the buildings are within the downtown radius. But when you look at the number of units, it is much more skewed–with only 35 percent in the downtowns. Why? Because smaller buildings with fewer units tend to be built in the downtowns.Is the story any better looking ahead? Unfortunately not.  While half of all the new buildings in the pipeline are in the downtown area, they are smaller buildings with the result that 70 percent of the total apartment units being created are more than half a mile away from the center where there is transit, stores, restaurants and more.It’s ironic that Long Island is still not moving more quickly to address the need for more housing options downtown, when a recent Long Island Index survey of Long Islanders shows that the demand is there. The survey, released last December, showed that a majority (60 percent) of Long Islanders said that they have at least some difficulty in meeting their monthly rent and mortgage payments, due to the Island’s persistently high housing costs, and more than half (52 percent) of Long Island residents could imagine themselves or an immediate family member living in an apartment, a condo or a townhouse in a local Long Island downtown.Long Island has a wonderful opportunity to turn around its current economic stagnation and create prosperity that will enhance the economic prospects of all Long Islanders. To seize the initiative, we need to build more downtown housing. The latest research by the Long Island Index shows that we are moving in the right direction but not nearly fast enough.Ann Golob is director of the Long Island Index, a project of the Rauch Foundation. The Index’s research is publicly available at www.longislandindex.orglast_img read more

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Government raises 2021 budget deficit to 5.2 percent of GDP

first_img“We will raise the fiscal deficit next year to weather the uncertainty and revive the economy while also handling the COVID-19 pandemic,” she told reporters in a livestreamed briefing after a Cabinet meeting.Read also: Indonesia records $17.5b budget deficit in H1 as govt seeks to bolster spendingWith a wider deficit, the government would have an additional Rp 179 trillion (US$12.33 billion) to support the economy next year, Sri Mulyani said, adding that it would spend more of the budget on priority programs on food security, industrial area development, technology development, education and health care.Indonesia has been struggling to fund its fight against the coronavirus outbreak with its cash-strapped budget, forcing the government to issue a law that allows it to widen the budget deficit beyond the 3 percent legal limit. Topics : The government will raise its 2021 state budget deficit assumption to 5.2 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) to weather the uncertainties of the pandemic, which is expected to continue affecting the economy next year.The change will be proposed to the House of Representatives, which previously agreed to the government’s proposal of a deficit between 4.17 percent and 4.7 percent of GDP.President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo wanted greater fiscal flexibility next year due to the uncertainty over the availability of a vaccine, Finance Minister Sri Mulyani Indrawati said on Tuesday.center_img The government expects the deficit to reach 6.34 percent this year as it sets aside Rp 695.2 trillion for stimulus measures to strengthen the country’s healthcare response and boost the economy. It has pledged to reinstate the deficit cap of 3 percent in 2023 by tapering government spending and boosting state revenue after the virus threat subsides.“The President has called on another Cabinet meeting to ensure the budget will be used to boost productivity and have the biggest economic impact,” Sri Mulyani went on to say. “This aims to reduce the poverty level and create more jobs to offset the job losses and rising poverty this year.”Read also: No global bonds in sight as Indonesia focuses on local debt marketAs many as 3.7 million individuals have lost their jobs so far this year. The total number of unemployed people will hit around 10 million by the end of the year, according to data from the National Development Planning Agency (Bappenas).Sri Mulyani expects the economy to contract 0.4 percent at worst or grow 1 percent at best this year. Economic growth in 2021 is projected to be somewhere between 4.5 and 5.5 percent.“We see that the impact of the pandemic will not be over by next year so it will have a ripple effect on the economy,” Bank Central Asia (BCA) economist David Sumual told The Jakarta Post, adding that the economy would be affected by several factors, including vaccine availability and the severity of the virus crisis.“The government’s decision to maintain the deficit at a relatively high level may help spur economic activity and reduce the possibility of economic contraction,” he said. “But it should now think about financing since Bank Indonesia’s help is only a one-off policy.”Read also: Corruption risk to Indonesia’s infrastructure push: ExpertsThe central bank has committed to a burden-sharing scheme worth Rp 574.59 trillion with the government as part of the country’s pandemic response, of which the central bank will buy Rp 397.5 trillion in government bonds directly while fully bearing interest costs. The scheme will only be implemented this year.“The government should spend its budget on programs that have a multiplier effect in order to expedite economic recovery, which will help the government earn higher taxes,” said Bank Permata economist Josua Pardede.“Government spending should be prioritized for programs that boost purchasing power, attract investment and create more jobs.”last_img read more

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Rare Cashmere acreage snare atypical price tag

first_imgThe home at 4 Heath Court, Cashmere.WHILE there have been few high-end acreage listings in Cashmere this year, properties that hit the market were seeing plenty of buyer interest.Liam West and Jason Mrak of Belle Property sold 4 Heath Court, Cashmere on November 27 for $1.135 million.Mr Mrak said that there were plenty of reasons to believe this home would achieve a monster result.“There’s not too many that sell at this price level, but we were confident,” he said.More from newsLand grab sees 12 Sandstone Lakes homesites sell in a week21 Jun 2020Tropical haven walking distance from the surf9 Oct 2019Mr Mrak said the home was large and its design, which had three different wings, allowed families a sense of separation. Inside the home at 4 Heath Court, Cashmere.“The central point of the home was the entertaining area, but each wing could accommodate certain members of the family,” Mr Mrak said. “It was also very nice — private acreage with very usable land.“The response we had was huge — about 50-plus people over a three-week campaign and probably 70 or 80 inquiries in that time.”Mr Mrak said Cashmere and its prestige market had been performing well and buyers should watch with interest in 2018.“We’re happy with the results we’re getting,” he said.last_img read more

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Blind woman killed by lethal injection

first_imgDailyMail 8 October 2013Medics have killed a woman by lethal  injection because she could not cope with becoming blind.In one of the first cases of euthanasia for a  disability, the 70-year-old was deemed by doctors to be ‘suffering  unbearably’.They granted her wish to die after she had  previously tried to commit suicide several times.But pro-life campaigners said the case showed  how euthanasia and assisted suicide for more trivial reasons can soon become the  ‘norm’ in countries where it is legal.They insisted it was medical negligence for  the doctors in Holland to have gone along with the woman’s suicidal ideas and  said they should have found a way to manage her psychological  problems.The unnamed woman had been born with poor  eyesight which had deteriorated into blindness as she entered old age.http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2448611/Blind-Dutch-woman-euthanised-loss-sight.htmllast_img read more

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What sort of strange lottery determines that one baby is celebrated while others are aborted?

first_imgStuff co.nz 1 November 2018Family First Comment: A superb article from Karl du Fresne – so many great statements that it’s hard to highlight the best one!“Alison Mau proposed during a radio debate that men be required to get permission from certifying consultants before getting prostate checks, as women seeking an abortion have to do. Journalist Alison Mau gave an early example of the fatuous arguments likely to be deployed when, in a one-sided panel discussion on Radio New Zealand, she proposed that men should be required to get permission from certifying consultants before getting prostate checks, as women seeking an abortion have to do. This reduced the whole issue to a puerile game of gender tit-for-tat. It got her a cheap laugh, but the nature and purpose of the two procedures are fundamentally different. Prostate checks are about identifying and treating a potentially fatal disease. Their purpose is to save life. But pregnancy is not a disease, a foetus is not a tumour, and the consequence of an abortion is that life is extinguished, not saved. If a high-profile journalist like Mau can’t grasp that crucial difference, we’re in bigger trouble than I thought.”Yep. www.ChooseLife.nz….It can make sense only if the incipient human life is considered intrinsically valueless unless its mother happens to want it. Is that what we’ve come to? In which case, in what circumstances does a life become worth saving? A similar question arose last year amid the general rejoicing at the news that Jacinda Ardern was having a baby. Many of the people who expressed delight at the prime minister’s pregnancy and the subsequent birth of Neve Te Aroha Ardern Gayford support the right of women to have an abortion, no questions asked.But isn’t it odd that we placed such value on Neve’s life when hardly anyone batted an eyelid at the 13,285 unborn babies who were aborted last year? What sort of strange lottery determines that one baby becomes a source of national celebration while others are sucked from the womb and consigned to a hospital incinerator? A similarly strange dichotomy occurs when skilled doctors perform miracles to save fragile newborns while elsewhere in the same hospitals, other doctors are paid by the state to kill them in the womb.More than 40 years after abortion was made pseudo-legal, we seem to be no closer to resolving this moral conundrum. It’s an issue that now confronts us again as pressure builds for the few existing controls on abortion to be removed.The Big Lie, which you can expect to hear repeated endlessly, is that abortion is a health issue. This is now a feminist article of faith. But no amount of repeating makes it true, because pregnancy and childbirth are not illnesses or disorders, and it’s impossible to imagine anything less healthy for the unborn child than to have its life terminated. The debate will be ugly – we know that from 1977. And the anti-abortion camp will be fighting with one hand tied behind its back, because the media are overwhelmingly pro-choice.Alison Mau proposed during a radio debate that men be required to get permission from certifying consultants before getting prostate checks, as women seeking an abortion have to do. Journalist Alison Mau gave an early example of the fatuous arguments likely to be deployed when, in a one-sided panel discussion on Radio New Zealand, she proposed that men should be required to get permission from certifying consultants before getting prostate checks, as women seeking an abortion have to do. This reduced the whole issue to a puerile game of gender tit-for-tat. It got her a cheap laugh, but the nature and purpose of the two procedures are fundamentally different. Prostate checks are about identifying and treating a potentially fatal disease. Their purpose is to save life.But pregnancy is not a disease, a foetus is not a tumour, and the consequence of an abortion is that life is extinguished, not saved. If a high-profile  journalist like Mau can’t grasp that crucial difference, we’re in bigger trouble than I thought.READ MORE: https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/opinion/108250663/what-sort-of-strange-lottery-determines-that-one-baby-is-celebrated-while-others-are-abortedKeep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more

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