Green conference

first_imgSpace is limited. For more information or to register, call (229) 386-3416 or visit www.caes.uga.edu/campus/tifton/conferences/events.html. University of GeorgiaThe green industry is using technology to help its professionals save gas and stay up-to-date. The Georgia/Florida Green Industry Update Video Conference will be held Tuesday, Oct. 7. Live presentations will be offered in Savannah, Ga., at the Bamboo Farm and Coastal Gardens; Jacksonville, Fla., at the Duval County Extension Office; and Quincy, Fla., at the North Florida Research and Education Center. Speakers will also be remotely broadcast to Savannah, Jacksonville and Quincy from other locations, including Athens, Ga., and Apopka, Fla. All speakers will be broadcast to all locations via Internet videoconference, reducing or eliminating travel costs for everyone involved. The conference is recommended for anyone in the green industry. “Staying up-to-date on new production and cultural practices, new plants, new pests and new products is an important part of the job,” said Gary Wade, a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension horticulturalist. “The industry update provides the latest information on a wide variety of current topics.” Speakers for the program include Paul Baker of Oasis Irrigation, Chip Bates of the Georgia Forestry Commission, Allan Armitage of UGA and Bob Stamps, Gary Knox and Terry DelValle of the University of Florida. Three hours of pesticide re-certification credits in ornamentals and turf will be offered to Georgia participants. Pesticide credits and CEUs will also be awarded to participants from South Carolina and Florida.last_img read more

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4-H Hall of Fame

first_imgThe National Association of Extension 4-H Agents honored Diane Davies, known as the founder of the environmental education program in Georgia, by inducting her into the National 4-H Hall of Fame on Oct. 12 at the National 4-H Youth Conference Center in Chevy Chase, Md.Davies helped develop the environmental education program for the University of Georgia Rock Eagle 4-H Center in Eatonton with an annual budget of only $300. She also raised funds, along with last year’s Hall of Fame inductee Tom Rodgers, to build Rock Eagle’s Museum of Natural History. For these and other accomplishments, she was named to the National 4-H Hall of Fame.Founded Georgia 4-H Environmental Education programDavies served as the state 4-H specialist for environmental education in Georgia for 24 years. She began her career with UGA Cooperative Extension in 1979 when she was hired specifically to develop the environmental education program. She created the classes, secured the resources, and served as the only instructor, administrator and promoter for the program for nine years. In the first year, the program served 2,000 students. Today it has expanded to all five Georgia 4-H centers and serves about 900,000 students in Georgia and across the southeastern United States. It has also produced $50 million in revenue, according to Arch Smith, Georgia’s state 4-H leader, who nominated Davies for the award.In 1990 Davies accomplished another significant 4-H effort when Rock Eagle opened the Museum of Natural History after she and Rodgers successfully secured a gift of $200,000 from the Cecil B. Day Foundation for the construction of the facility. Master fund-raiserDavies has also worked with the 4-H Foundation and other 4-H faculty to raise funds for the enhancement of other center amenities, including the Wildlife Ecology and Woodruff Aquatic Buildings and the Project Adventure Ropes Courses. She also served as project coordinator for Global Food Web, a program funded by a Kellogg Foundation grant to educate youth about world hunger and food supply issues. Through her affiliation with Global Food Web, Davies was named a W.K. Kellogg Foundation Fellow and carried out additional environmental work in Africa, Australia, Alaska and the Galapagos Islands.She has received several honors throughout her career including the D.W. Brooks Faculty Award for Extension, the Outstanding Service Award from the North American Association for Environmental Education and the Distinguished Alumni Award from UGA’s Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies.She’s an artist, too After retiring, Davies started a pottery business and held small art shows at her home. Her shows quickly out grew there humble beginnings, and in 2009 they were moved to the Rock Eagle 4-H Center. Now “Art at the Rock,” an annual event, includes more than 50 artists in a juried art show.She remains an active supporter of Georgia 4-H serving on the advisory committee and as an environmental education guest lecturer at numerous conferences and programs across the nation. Davies is the 13th Georgian to be named to the National 4-H Hall of Fame.last_img read more

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Vermont Sustainable Jobs Fund awards $334,765 in grants for biofuels projects

first_imgThe Vermont Sustainable Jobs Fund has awarded $334,765 in grant funds to develop local biofuels and foster the development of a viable biomass-to-biofuels industry in Vermont that uses local resources to replace petroleum with renewable alternatives.Ellen Kahler, VSJF Executive Director, stated that the “catastrophe of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill is yet another reminder of the consequences of our dependence on non-renewable fossil fuels for energy.  As the devastating ecological, cultural, and economic consequences of the spill unfold in the Gulf of Mexico, Vermont is continuing to explore opportunities for entrepreneurs, farmers, educators and others to develop renewable, sustainable energy alternatives. ““The projects funded through our Vermont Biofuels Initiative (VBI) are aimed at transitioning Vermont away from non-renewable energy toward local, renewable energy production.  Our oilseed-to-biodiesel grants will help Vermont’s dairy and other farms control fuel and feed costs by producing biodiesel and protein meal, and create new sources of farm revenue from the sale of locally produced livestock feed, vegetable oil, and bio-based energy,” said Biofuels Director Netaka White. Additionally, VBI grants are helping to stimulate research and development of algae as a biofuel feedstock. “Algae has the potential to substantially reduce fossil fuel consumption, while creating a host of new energy and technology business opportunities,” White said.The VSJF awarded $334,765 through two competitive grant rounds designed to accelerate the development of Vermont’s green economy through local production of liquid biofuels.  The VBI is funded by a Congressionally Directed Award from the Office of U.S. Senator Patrick Leahy through the U.S. Department of Energy, various private foundation sources, and the State of Vermont General Fund.For more information on the VSJF or the Vermont Biofuels Initiative visit www.vsjf.org(link is external).The Grantees include:$30,000     Ekolott and Living Earth Farms in Newbury, VT — to gathercomparative agronomic and economic data on organic and conventional methods of oilseed crop production and processing and evaluate organic desiccants, deer repellant, planting and harvest times to reduce crop loss to birds and deer.$45,000     Nava Bio-Energy in Brookfield, VT — to improve processingtechnology, refine the process chain, and maximize production in order to lower production costs and improve profitability of biodiesel production in Central Vermont.$30,000    Otter Creek Biofuels / Woods Market Garden in Brandon, VT — togather comparative agronomic and economic data on organic and conventional methods of oilseed crop production and processing in order to expand oilseed crop production and oilseed pressing in West Central Vermont for eventual processing into biodiesel.$35,250     Rainbow Valley Biodiesel in Brandon, VT — to increase grainstorage and oilseed pressing capacity in order to expand the scale of oilseed and biodiesel production in Addison and Rutland counties.$64,515     Carbon Harvest in Burlington, VT to test the suitability of fluegas from landfills in order to determine the optimal conditions for commercial algae cultivation.$65,000     General Systems Research in Burlington, VT — to identify andcultivate native  microalgae species suited for cold weather and use a rapid screening method of lipids quantification.$65,000     Green Mountain Spark in Burlington, VT — to experiment withusing a photochemical process to separate oil from algae and turn the oil into biofuel in the same photobioreactor.The VSJF is a nonprofit organization formed by the State Legislature in 1995 to provide early stage grant funding and technical assistance to catalyze and accelerate the development of markets for sustainably produced goods and services.  The VSJF currently focuses on biofuels development, sustainable forest products industry development, and the expansion of local food systems in Vermont.Source: VSJF. 7.14.2010last_img read more

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Comments requested on senior judges seeking service renewal

first_img March 15, 2006 Regular News Comments requested on senior judges seeking service renewal The following senior judges’ current service will expire on September 30 and they are seeking service renewal. Any persons having knowledge bearing upon the fitness or qualifications of any of the senior judges on this list to continue service as a senior judge should send written comments to Thomas D. Hall, Clerk, Florida Supreme Court, 500 South Duval Street, Tallahassee 32399, or by e-mail at seniorjudge@flcourts.org, or by telephone to the chair of the appropriate review board as noted on or before April 15. Supreme Court Justices (Chief Justice Barbara J. Pariente, chair, (850) 488-8421): James E. Alderman and Ben F. Overton. Review Board One (Judge Charles Kahn, chair, (850) 487-1000, ext. 170):Russell A. Cole, Jr., Thomas R. Ellinor, Erwin Fleet, Marvin H. Gillman, R. A. Green, Jr., Mattox S. Hair, James L. Harrison, Richard L. Hood, L. Arthur Lawrence, Jr., Michael D. Miller, George H. Pierce, John D. Southwood, and Joseph Q. Tarbuck. Review Board Two (Judge Chris Altenbernd, chair, (813) 272-3430):Horace A. Andrews, Robert E. Beach, E. Randolph Bentley, William L Blackwell, Fred L. Bryson, Charles T. Carlton, Stephen L. Dakan, Paul W. Danahy, Jr., Daniel E. Gallagher, Thomas M. Gallen, John M. Gilbert, Roland Gonzalez, Oliver L. Green, Jr., Helen S. Hansel, William L. Hendry, William Clayton Johnson, Elvin L. Martinez, Robert F. Michael, Jr., Cecelia M. Moore, Jack R. Schoonover, Radford W. Smith, Ralph Steinberg, J. Tim Strickland, Kirby Sullivan, Edward F. Threadgill, David Seth Walker, and John D. Wessel. Review Board Three (Judge Gerald Cope, Jr., chair, (305) 229-3200):Jack Block, Eli Breger, Thomas M. Carney, Phillip Cook, Robert M. Deehl, John W. Dell, Charles D. Edelstein, Richard Y. Feder, Seymour Gelber, William E. Gladstone, Edward S. Klein, Gerald J. Klein, Richard V. Margolius, Joseph Nesbitt, Gerard J. O’Brien, Jr., Thomas K. Petersen, Leonard Rivkind, Stephen D. Robinson, Michael H. Salmon, Alan R. Schwartz, Raphael Steinhardt, Herbert Stettin, and David L. Tobin. Review Board Four (Judge Fred Hazouri, (561) 242-2078):Richard B. Burk, David C. Clark, Patricia W. Cocalis, Walter N. Colbath, Jr., Robert O. Collins, J. Leonard Fleet, Robert J. Fogan, Howard H. Harrison, Jr., Bernard R. Jaffe, Barbara S. Levenson, Hubert R. Lindsey, Gerald Mager, James A. McCauley, James W. Midelis, John A. Miller, Estella M. Moriarty, W. Herbert Moriarty, Robert H. Newman, William C. Owen, Jr., Jerry Pollock, Deborah Dale Pucillo, Edward Rodgers, and C. Pfeiffer Trowbridge. Review Board Five (Judge Robert Pleus, chair, (386) 947-1500):John C. Adkins, John W. Booth, Warren H. Cobb, Ted P. Coleman, S. Joseph Davis, Jr., Murray Goldman, J. Lewis Hall, Jr., Wallace H. Hall, Charles M. Harris, Fredric M. Hitt, William C. Johnson, Jr., Lawrence V. Johnston, III, Frank N. Kaney, Robert P. Kaye, Robert E. Lee, Jr., Jere B. Lober, C. Vernon Mize, Jr., Melvin Orfinger, Earl W. Peterson, Jr., Frederick T. Pfeiffer, Rom W. Powell, Charles N. Prather, Edward J. Richardson, Dorothy J. Russell, Harry Stein, Richard O. Watson, Richard G. Weinberg, J. William Woodson, and Freddie J. Worthen. Comments requested on senior judges seeking service renewallast_img read more

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South Asia coronavirus cases top 37,000, headache for govts eyeing lockdown end

first_img“We have to remain focused in this fight, the effort is to stop the spread at any cost,” said Satyendra Jain, the health minister of Delhi, one of India’s top three virus hotspots.”If we want end the lockdown, we have to bring down the number of red zones.”Pakistan PM tests negative In neighboring Pakistan, which has roughly half as many cases as India, Prime Minister Imran Khan tested negative for the virus, the information and broadcasting minister said. South Asia’s coronavirus infections have crossed 37,000, with more than half in India, official data showed on Thursday, complicating the task of governments looking to scale back lockdowns that have destroyed the livelihoods of millions.Authorities in India sought this week to ease a stringent 40-day lockdown of the population of 1.3 billion by allowing farm and industrial activity in the least-affected rural areas.But more than 1,400 new cases reported on Wednesday, for one of India’s biggest single-day jumps in recent weeks, carried its tally to 21,392 infections. Topics :center_img Khan was tested after a meeting last week with the head of one of the country’s biggest charity organizations, who later proved to have the virus.”I am happy to report that his test is negative,” said Firdous Ashiq Awan, the minister.But concern is growing over Pakistan’s move, in response to appeals from religious groups, to allow mosque gatherings during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan, despite experts’ warnings that they could fuel uncontrollable spread of the virus.The fasting month is expected to begin on Friday.Until now, South Asia, home to a fifth of the world’s population, has suffered fewer infections in the pandemic than rich nations such as Britain, Spain and the United States.But that could be the result of lower rates of testing that health experts believe may allow the virus to lurk undetected.”We have repeatedly said there is no alternative to a testing, trace and quarantine program,” said Sonia Gandhi, the chief of India’s main opposition Congress party.”Unfortunately, testing still remains low and testing kits are still in short supply and of poor quality.”Here are official government figures on the spread of the coronavirus in South Asia:* India has reported 21,392 cases, including 681 deaths * Pakistan has reported 10,513 cases, including 224 deaths * Afghanistan has reported 1,176 cases, including 40 deaths * Sri Lanka has reported 330 cases, including seven deaths * Bangladesh has reported 3,772 cases, including 120 deaths * Maldives has reported 34 cases and no deaths* Nepal has reported 45 cases and no deaths * Bhutan has reported six cases and no deathslast_img read more

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The winning bidders of Hamilton Hill icon, Cremorne, have been revealed

first_imgThe winning bidders react at the auction of prestige Hamilton property Cremorne at Place, East Brisbane on Thursday, October 5, 2017. (AAP Image/Claudia Baxter)THE winning bidders who paid $5.975 million for Cremorne at 34 Mullens St, Hamilton have been revealed as local business owners Galen and Lynda Gunn. The couple said they can’t wait to move in and start establishing their family in the home.The couple can’t wait to take possession and start establishing themselves as part of Cremorne’s story.“I’m looking forward to turning it into our home — personalising it and giving it our own touch,” Mr Gunn said.Follow Kieran Clair on Twitter at @kieranclair Cremorne at 34 Mullens Street, Hamilton is one of Brisbane’s most significant homes.Mr Gunn is the director of Hawcs, an aerial surveying company that services powerlines and utility providers.He is also part of a Queensland grazing dynasty with his late grandfather, Sir William Gunn, a renowned wool and cattle identity.“We go back eight generations of running around with cattle — I’ve diversified into helicopters but my old man is still heavily into it and we’ve still got the cows running around on our property out west,” Mr Gunn said.The couple were overjoyed with their acquisition of the home at the October 7 auction.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this homeless than 1 hour agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investorless than 1 hour agoLynda and Galen Gunn are congratulated by Place Bulimba managing director, Sarah Hackett. Photo: AAP Image/Claudia BaxterThe iconic circa 1905 structure is a grand colonial residence with a contemporary architectural extension that perfectly suited the family’s requirements.“We had actually been looking for a modern home — but we just couldn’t fall in love with anything modern. It’s that beautiful character and that history behind a home like that which is just special,” Mrs Gunn said.center_img The home’s contemporary extension was an award winner.Mrs Gunn said their Brisbane move was prompted by schooling opportunities for their two sons, and she couldn’t be happier about their new purchase.“I was actually a little bit surprised and thrilled at the same time. It was quite emotional — we’re thrilled, just thrilled to get it,” Mrs Gunn said.Mr Gunn remained calm throughout the high-stakes auction, even unintentionally holding up proceedings when he left for a drink of water. Mr Gunn drew on his livestock market background at the event.“I’ve been to plenty of cattle auctions and thrown the paddle in the air mate, but we’ve never actually bought a house at auction — that’s always an experience. It was a bit of fun — I enjoyed it,” Mr Gunn said.last_img read more

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Senator Leising talks Emotional Support Animals

first_imgOldenburg, In. — Over the last few years, I have received numerous constituent complaints regarding emotional support and service animal fraud. For example, airline passengers have tried to bring pets onto flights without paying fees, and tenants have taken advantage of apartment owners to get by no-pet policies.Recently, in Indiana, an apartment owner told me a tenant brought 2 cats and 10 rats to their apartment complex, stating they were needed for emotional support.After looking into the problem, I found these animals are largely regulated by the federal government. Service animals are regulated by the Americans with Disabilities Act, emotional support animals are regulated by the Fair Housing Act, and animals on airlines are regulated by the Air Carrier Access Act.To begin addressing this issue at the state level, I focused on emotional support animal fraud. During the 2018 session, I authored Senate Enrolled Act 240, which allows individuals offering to rent or make available a dwelling to those with emotional support animals to request written proof of their need for the animal from a health service provider if their disability is not apparent.The bill also makes it a Class A infraction if an individual submits a request for an emotional support animal that falsely suggests they have a disability, entitling them to have the animal in a dwelling.Sally Irvin, the founder and program director of the Indiana Canine Assistant Network, supported my legislation, saying it will help assure the welfare of the public, people with disabilities and even their animals are protected.Gov. Eric Holcomb recently signed SEA 240 into law. While this bill is a step in the right direction, passing other legislation may be difficult because of federal regulation. However, I will continue to look into the issue to see what else can be done at the state level.For more information on the legislation, click here.last_img read more

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Indianapolis-based company recalls salad products

first_imgIndianapolis, In. — Caito Foods, LLC, an Indianapolis, Ind. establishment, is recalling approximately 1,532 pounds of ready-to-eat salad and bowl products made with chicken that contain a corn ingredient that may be contaminated with Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.The ready-to-eat salads and bowls made with chicken were produced from Oct. 6, 2018, through Oct. 14, 2018. The following products are subject to recall: [View Label (PDF only)]5-oz. plastic clamshell packages containing “good & deLISH sante fe style salad with chicken,” with “ENJOY BY” dates of 10/13/18 through 10/21/18 (inclusive).75-oz. plastic clamshell packages containing “Santa Fe Style Salad with Chicken,” with “Sell By” date of 10/13/18 through 10/21/18 (inclusive).25-oz. plastic clamshell packages containing “FRESH Garden HIGHWAY SALADS SANTA FE STYLE SALAD WITH CHICKEN,” with “Best If Sold By” dates of 10/12/18 through 10/20/18 (inclusive).12-oz. plastic bowl packages containing “good to go! Chipotle Chicken Bowl,” with “Sell By” dates of 10/11/18 through 10/19/18 (inclusive).75-oz. plastic clamshell packages containing “FRESH Garden HIGHWAY Santa Fe Style Salad with Chicken,” with “Best if Sold By” dates of 10/13/18 through 10/21/18 (inclusive).The products subject to recall bear establishment number “P-39985” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to retail locations in Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota and Missouri.The problem was discovered on Oct, 14, 2018, when Caito Foods, LLC received notification that the corn used in the production of their ready-to-eat salad products was being recalled by their corn supplier due to Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella concerns.There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.Consumption of food contaminated with Salmonella can cause salmonellosis, one of the most common bacterial foodborne illnesses. The most common symptoms of salmonellosis are diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever within 12 to 72 hours after eating the contaminated product. The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days. Most people recover without treatment. In some persons, however, the diarrhea may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized. Older adults, infants, and persons with weakened immune systems are more likely to develop a severe illness. Individuals concerned about an illness should contact their health care provider.Consumption of food contaminated with L. monocytogenes can cause listeriosis, a serious infection that primarily affects older adults, persons with weakened immune systems, and pregnant women and their newborns. Less commonly, persons outside these risk groups are affected.Listeriosis can cause fever, muscle aches, headache, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance and convulsions sometimes preceded by diarrhea or other gastrointestinal symptoms. An invasive infection spreads beyond the gastrointestinal tract. In pregnant women, the infection can cause miscarriages, stillbirths, premature delivery or life-threatening infection of the newborn. In addition, serious and sometimes fatal infections in older adults and persons with weakened immune systems. Listeriosis is treated with antibiotics. Persons in the higher-risk categories who experience flu-like symptoms within two months after eating contaminated food should seek medical care and tell the health care provider about eating the contaminated food.FSIS is concerned that some product may be in consumers’ refrigerators. Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.last_img read more

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It’s tradition: Whitwell tops Thursday IMCA Modified main at Dirt Track

first_imgLAS VEGAS, Nev. (March 3) – R.C. Whitwell continued one Las Vegas Motor Speedway tradition Thursday night.He’ll look to improve on another Friday.For the third straight year, Whitwell was Xtreme Motor Sports IMCA Modified winner on opening night of the midweek special at the half-mile Dirt Track. He was the night two runner-up there in 2014 and 2015, a trend he hopes to reverse with another $750 checkers.The victory was his first in 10 starts this season.“I’d already won five or six features by this time last year so it felt pretty good to finally get this one,” said Whitwell, who started on the pole and led all 25 laps. “We got into lapped traffic but I was able to zip through without any problems.”Cody Laney and Bobby Hogge IV also drove Bill Henderson-owned cars and finished second and third, respectively. Laney ran out of time to reel in Whitwell and ended some seven car lengths off the pace.Colt Mather and Ethan Dotson completed the top five.Thirty-nine drivers signed in and eight states were represented in the main event.Another $750 top prize, plus IMCA Speedway Motors Weekly Racing National, Larry Shaw Racing Western Region and Allstar Performance State points, are at stake on Friday.Modified heat races start at approximately 9:25 p.m. Friday.Feature results – 1. R.C. Whitwell, Tucson, Ariz.; 2. Cody Laney, Torrance, Calif.; 3. Bobby Hogge IV, Salinas, Calif.; 4. Colt Mather, Keswick, Iowa; 5. Ethan Dotson, Bakersfield, Calif.; 6. Logan Drake, San Luis Obispo, Calif.; 7. Paul Stone, Winton, Calif.; 8. Justen Yeager, Green River, Wyo.; 9. Josh Vogt, Santa Maria, Calif.; 10. Casey Delp, Rock Springs, Wyo.; 11. Robert Sanders, Bakersfield, Calif.; 12. Steve Simpson Jr., Kingman, Ariz.; 13. Phil Penney, Percival, Iowa; 14. Bobby Horton, Yuma, Ariz.; 15. Jim Perkins, Williams, Ariz.; 16. Randy McDaniel, Olivehurst, Calif.; 17. Jake Donnelly, Rigby, Idaho; 18. Jessie Hoskins, Longdale, Okla.; 19. Charles Davis Jr., Buckeye, Ariz.; 20. Rick Durica, Las Vegas; 21. Kevin Irwin, Bakersfield, Calif.; 22. Kenny Wallace, Concord, N.C.; 23. Clay Daly, Watsonville, Calif.last_img read more

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