Sagicor Sigma Corporate Run expands its reach

first_imgKingston, Jamaica: Sagicor Group, the organisers of the annual, Sagicor Sigma Corporate Run, is expanding its reach in 2016 with the goal to raise $50 million, almost double its 2015 target.  This in an effort to strengthen three beneficiaries: Children with Cancer across Jamaica, the Jamaica Cancer Society and the Black River Hospital Pediatric Unit.  According to Vice President of Marketing at Sagicor, Ingrid Card, “The well-being of our children has always been the main focus of the Sagicor Sigma Run, now in its 18th year and we will continue this year as we aim to assist with the treatment of children who are afflicted with cancer.” “We have expanded our focus this year to include the Jamaica Cancer Society, as we aim to purchase a mammography machine for their mobile screening programme. We embrace the corporate companies and individuals who have joined us on this mission and have confirmed their participation in this year’s Run event,” added Card. “We are collectively and through the donations from the public aiming to raise more funds so our beneficiaries can receive the assistance they need,” said Card. The Run event, scheduled for Sunday, February 21 will cater to 25,000 runners, walkers and wheelchair participants. Over the years Sagicor, through the Sigma Run has donated approximately $166 million to child related charities and this year the company has set out to meet its biggest target yet. Donations to support this year’s beneficiaries can be made via pledge forms, local donors may make cheques payable to Sigma Run 2016 and deposit at any Sagicor Bank location island wide or deposit cash to Account Number – 5502392157. Information on how to register a company team or individual can be found via Sagicor Group Jamaica’s website: https://www.sagicorjamaica.com/aboutsagicor/sigma-run/how-to-register, by calling the Sigma Run secretariat at 936-7843, 936-7361 or 936-7262.  The Secretariat can also be reached at email at SGJSigmaSecretariat@Sagicor.com.last_img read more

Read More »

‘Liberia is Close to Our Heart’, Says Norwegian Foreign Minister

first_imgThe Foreign Minister of the Kingdom of Norway, Borge Brende, has said that Liberia is close to the heart of Norway and they could not sit idly by and see the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) ravage the country.  Instead, he said, Norway is joining the fight to eradicate the disease.When the disease is eradicated with all of the global attention and support that the crisis is now receiving, the Norwegian Government will resume its development aid to Liberia, Minister Brende said. Norway’s prime focus of assistance to Liberia is in the energy and forestry sectors.The Norwegian Foreign Minister was speaking during a joint press conference on Tuesday at the Foreign Ministry in Monrovia.  Also participating in the press conference were President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf and Rajiv Shah, Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development (USAID).Foreign Minister Brende announced that 160 doctors from his country have already signed up to be deployed to the three West African Ebola affected states.He also announced that Norway will provide military transportation in the form of logistical support to Liberia, aimed at eradicating the epidemic.This support is in addition to what the Norwegian Government has committed since the outbreak of the virus in the region. The government of the small European country had already committed over US$60 million to the response exercise in the Mano River Union (MRU). He also made disclosure of an additional US$15 million to be channeled through the World Health Organization (WHO) for affected countries.Minister Brende, who was in the country to get a firsthand look and briefing on the outbreak and its effect on the country, renewed Norway’s commitment to assist Liberia with Ebola, as well as his country’s partnership beyond Ebola.The Norwegian Foreign Minister, who is also Councilor of State and presides over the Ministry which is responsible for trade, foreign aid and cooperation with international organizations, stressed that his Government saw it as a responsibility to reach out to Liberia due to the long standing relationship between the two countries, especially with President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, a Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, at the helm. The Nobel Prizes are awarded annually by the Kingdom of Norway.It may be recalled that during a high-level Ebola Crisis Event held in connection with the World Bank annual meetings in Washington, D.C. last week, Foreign Minister, on behalf of his country, pledged well over US$10 million toward a new multi-donor fund for the fight against Ebola set up by the World Bank. “It is positive that the World Bank is setting up a fund to put the health sector in the affected countries in a better position to deal with the crisis,” he declared. For his part, the USAID Administrator Rajiv Shah informed journalists that the United States has put into place significant measures,  including finances, in order to contain the spread of the virus.Mr. Shah disclosed that the U.S. Government had approved and begun spending US$400 million with over 600 staff of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the country working with USAID to support the Liberian Government, making it the largest CDC operation outside of the United States.The USAID Administrator further announced that the U.S. Government, through USAID, would give US$5 million to support the Liberian Government in its compensation program for health care workers. Mr. Shah noted, however, that this amount is part of the US$142 million critical support, out of which US$65 million would be targeted toward training, community-based engagements and the construction of care centers across the country.The USAID Administrator renewed the United States’ commitment to helping Liberia in its fight against the Ebola virus disease and hoped that everyone would work together to return Liberia to normalcy in order to resume its development programs.Other members of the Norwegian delegation that met President Sirleaf included: Chief of Staff Vebjorn Dysvik and Harald Tollan of the West Africa Unit of the Norwegian Foreign Ministry; while the USAID Administrator was accompanied by USAID Country Director in Liberia, John Marc Winfield, DART Leader Bill Berger and U.S, Ambassador to Liberia Deborah Malac.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Read More »

TD’S ANGER AFTER AIB REFUSE TO PASS ON INTEREST RATE CUT

first_imgANGRY Sinn Fein TD Pearse Doherty has hit out at banks refusing to pass on the latest rate cut to cash-strapped mortgage holders.The Donegal South West TD has challenged the government to force AIB to pass on the 0.25% rate cut announced today by the European Central Bank.AIB said it couldn’t afford to pass on the cut. Other banks are passing on all or some of it. But Deputy Doherty said: “This should be welcome news to the more than 100,000 families in mortgage distress across the state and the many thousands more at risk of falling into arrears.“However this will depend on whether the Government will take the necessary action to force the banks to respond positively to today’s ECB announcement.“Last month, despite all the bluster from Government, Bank of Ireland and Ulster Bank refused to to pass on the last reduction to hard pressed mortgage holders.“The Government promised to take action but when it came to the crunch they hid behind the advice of the Financial Regulator. “Today some banks have announced their intention to pass on the rate cut. However Bank of Ireland has said it will only pass on a portion of the cut and Allied Irish Bank has said it would not pass on the cut at all.“It is time for the Government to intervene and introduce the necessary legislation to force the hand of those banks who behave in such a reckless fashion. Considering the amount of tax payers’ money that has been given to the banks it is about time they were forced to give something back to struggling mortgage holders.” TD’S ANGER AFTER AIB REFUSE TO PASS ON INTEREST RATE CUT was last modified: December 8th, 2011 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:AIBDeputy Pearse Dohertyrate cutlast_img read more

Read More »

DONEGAL SFC: BRAVE NAOMH MUIRE GIVE NAOMH CONAILL A FRIGHT

first_imgPaul ‘The Yank’ Boyle was sent off as Naomh Muire were narrowly defeated on their return to the Donegal SFC against Naomh Conaill.Naomh Muire returned to senior championship action for the first time since 2000 and gave a great account of themselves pushing Naomh Conaill all the way in their Donegal SFC clash at The Banks. Naomh Muire won the Intermediate championship last season and in doing so ensured a return to senior championship football.However, Naomh Conaill were expected to power past the challenge of the men from the Lower Rosses, but that didn’t materialize as a young Naomh Muire side delivered an accomplished performance. Naomh Conaill in truth were glad to hear the final whistle in the end up as 14 man Naomh Muire rallied late on with a succession of scores.In what was an absolutely bruising championship game, scores were hard to come by in the opening half.Dara White scored a couple of lovely points in the opening period, but a spate of points from Dermot Molloy and Dara Gallagher gave Naomh Conaill a three point advantage at the break.Half time score Naomh Muire 0-03 Naomh Conaill 0-06 The second-half followed a similar theme to the first, it was physical, and there were bruising challenges exchanged by both sides all over the pitch.However, Naomh Muire were dealt a hammer blow ten minutes into the second-half when Paul ‘The Yank’ Boyle was sent off.The talismanic captain is a crucial player for Naomh Muire, and Naomh Conaill used that one man advantage to stretch their lead out to six midway through the second half.Naomh Conaill looked like they would cruise to victory, but a spirited fight-back from Naomh Muire almost earned them a draw.Two cracking scores from Padraig McCafferty reduced the deficit to four 0-12 to 0-08. Then scores from Shaun ‘The Yank’ Boyle and Harry Harden reduced the arrears to just two with a few minutes left.Naomh Muire continued to put Naomh Conaill on the back foot, but the Glenties men showed their experience at this level, and just managed to get over the line.They’ll be delighted with the win, but they were made to fight for it by a spirited, well-organised and determined Naomh Muire side.Final score – Naomh Muire 0-10 Naomh Conaill 0-12 Next up for Naomh Muire is St. Eunans in O’Donnell Park, but they’ll look forward to that challenge after proving they can hold their own with the best in the Donegal SFC.Naomh Conaill now face Malin in their next Donegal SFC fixture next weekend.DONEGAL SFC: BRAVE NAOMH MUIRE GIVE NAOMH CONAILL A FRIGHT was last modified: September 27th, 2014 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Donegal SFCNaomh ConaillNAOMH MUIREnewsSportlast_img read more

Read More »

Blair, Marshall still searching for thrill of victory

first_img “The potential is there. If we we’re getting blown out, that’s one thing. But we’ve been in both games, and figure now’s the time to get a victory.’ St. Francis (2-0) at Burbank Burroughs (2-0), 7 p.m. The Golden Knights’ victories over Arcadia (17-12) and Crescenta Valley (40-7) have been impressive enough to earn a No. 2 ranking in CIF-Southern Section Division III, but they’re not exactly indicators of how the Knights will do once Mission League play begins. That test will come tonight, when the Knights face an undefeated Indians team that competes in the difficult Foothill League with traditional powers Hart, Valencia, Canyon, Saugus and Burbank, which have a combined record of 10-2 in nonleague action. The Indians boast victories over Montebello Schurr (30-14) and Verdugo Hills (33-23), but in last year’s meeting, a senior-laden Knights team defeated the Indians, 38-22. The Knights’ strengths are on their offensive and defensive lines, and have they been particularly strong on the defensive side, but the key is how their impact players improve from week to week. Nathan Stark has rushed for 166 yards, and quarterback Stephen Peterson has been a modest 21 of 34 for 255 yards in the Knights’ first two games. But those numbers need to improve for the Knights’ success to continue. San Gabriel (1-1) at La Puente (0-3), 7 p.m. The Matadors were manhandled in a 45-12 loss to a Westminster team that was too big and physical for them last week. Quarterback Saile Ramirez took quite a pounding, but he should have more time to get the offense going against a struggling Warriors team looking for their first victory. Ramirez and Almont League first team receiver Alfred Varela lead the area in their respective positions, with Ramirez averaging 224 yards per game, and Varela with 15 receptions for 252 yards. This is bad news for a Warriors team that has been shut out twice, and is allowing an average of 32 points a game. Fred J. Robledo can be reached at (626) 962-8811, Ext. 4485, or by e-mail at fred.robledo@sgvn.com. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! While the Vikings have been routed by Saugus (57-0) and Keppel (48-19), the Eagles are actually close to being 2-0. In the Eagles’ opening loss to Duarte, they trailed 21-0 at half, but nearly came back to win before losing, 24-20. Against Pasadena Poly last week, they lost another close game, 10-6. “We’re not that down on ourselves because we know that we’ve been beating ourselves with penalties,’ Lopez said. “We go 10 yards, then get pushed back 10 yards. “That’s just discipline, and a problem we’re trying to fix, and have to fix if we want to win some games. Marshall High School football coach Johnny Lopez can sympathize with Blair High coach Joe Alayra. Both are in their first year on the job, and both are seeking their first victory after opening the season 0-2. center_img The two Pasadena schools square off at 7 tonight at Muir High School, and one will get its first taste of victory. “I just hope it’s us, because we’ve been so close,’ Lopez said. “Joe is doing the best he can over there, and I’m doing the same. We’re not just trying to win games, we’re trying to build programs, and that will take some time.’ last_img read more

Read More »

Woman climbs Errigal during effort to climb 28 mountains for charity

first_imgCounty Down woman El Fegan has challenged herself to climb 28 of Ireland’s highest peaks, spanning all 32 counties, in aid of the Alzheimer’s Society.Mount Errigal marks the half-way point for El as it is the 14th summit she has reached.She says; “Some of the peaks are considerably small so any less than 500m will be done in a 10kg weighted vest to make it a little more challenging.” “I am really looking forward to taking on this charity challenge, it is an exciting adventure for me, a chance to explore our beautiful island, meet new people, as well as an amazing opportunity to raise funds & awareness along the way.”“I have already been overwhelmed with peoples generosity in allowing me to take on this challenge; friends & especially those from the air bnb community who don’t even know me & are willing to put me up a night or 2 along my way.”“I have an amazing bunch of girls who work with me who will cover me while I take almost 3 weeks out of my busy work schedule whilst on the road on & not to mention my house sitter who is going to look after my fur babies.”“Dementia can happen to anyone and there’s currently no cure. There are 850,000 people with dementia in the UK and the number is set to rise to 1 million by 2021.” If you would like to join El you can get in touch in the following places; Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat (@feggie1).To donate to El’s amazing cause you can do so by clicking here. Woman climbs Errigal during effort to climb 28 mountains for charity was last modified: October 15th, 2016 by Elaine McCalligShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Read More »

Ruthless Toms retains title

first_imgNortholt’s Ryan Toms ruthlessly brushed aside Pat McAleese on Saturday night to retain his southern-area light-middleweight title.Toms, making his first defence, stopped McAleese in the fourth round of their bout on the undercard of the Tyson Fury-Dereck Chisora fight at Wembley Arena.The 29-year-old southpaw rocked McAleese in the third, before flooring him with a body shot early in the next round. He then followed up with a combination that forced the referee to call a halt.Toms, who was on QPR’s books as a teenager, is unbeaten in nine fights as a professional.last_img read more

Read More »

Automatic Emergency Brake Found on Molecular Motor

first_imgIn this article, guest writer Ross Anderson (PhD, biochemistry professor) discusses a new finding about how an ’emergency brake’ works in one of the most vital of all molecular machines, ATP synthase. First, he explains the molecular rotary motor and what it does.Review of “Extrinsic conditions influence the self-association and structure of IF1, the regulatory protein of mitochondrial ATP synthase” by Boreikaite et al., PNAS.Evaluated by Ross S. Anderson, Ph.D.First let’s take a brief look at what the ATP synthase (here referred to simply as the Synthase) is and its importance to life. In eukaryotes the Synthase is located in the mitochondrial inner membrane. In prokaryotes, such as E. coli, it is located in the cell membrane as these organisms lack mitochondria.Why ATP Is ImportantAdenosine triphosphate (ATP) is one of several high-energy compounds used by all cells to drive reactions necessary for life. Without it, life as we know it would not be possible. While it is not the only high-energy compound in the cell, it is the one most widely used by cells. To carry out its moment-to-moment activities a cell must have a constant supply of ATP. Most of the cell’s ATP needs are supplied by the ATP synthase molecular motor.In eukaryotes, such as humans, the mitochondria are the “power houses” of the cell as these contain the Synthase. In order for the synthase to synthesize ATP, there must be a steady supply of oxygen. Oxygen is delivered to the cells via hemoglobin in the red blood cells. The oxygen is then transferred to another protein in the cell known as myoglobin (responsible for the red color of muscle), myoglobin then carries the oxygen to the mitochondria where it serves as an electron acceptor to form water. The electrons come from food molecules eaten by the organism. They are removed by a variety of metabolic pathways and given to electron-carrier molecules such as NAD+ and FAD to form NADH and FADH2, respectively.Optimizing the MotorsElectrons from FADH2 and NADH are then transferred to protein complexes also located in the inner mitochondrial membrane. As the electrons are passed from one protein complex to another and ultimately to oxygen, they are used to power what are termed proton “pumps” which pump protons (H+) out of the mitochondrial matrix (the inner most part of the mitochondria) to the intermembrane space (the space between the inner and outer membranes of the mitochondria). This sets up a proton gradient with a high concentration of protons outside (intermembrane space) and a lower concentration inside (matrix).As protons travel back into the matrix down the gradient, the potential energy in the gradient is used to synthesize ATP. The inner membrane is impermeable to the protons, so to reach the matrix, the protons must travel through the Synthase. As they travel through the synthase, they cause an internal rotor, called the γ subunit to rotate in increments of 120°. As the γ subunit rotates, its contacts with the α3β3 subunits that comprise the knob part of the Synthase protruding into the matrix, cause a series of conformational changes in the 3 β subunits leading to the binding of ADP + Pi, the synthesis of ATP, and the release of ATP.The Role of OxygenAs stated above, in order for the synthase to synthesize ATP, there must be an ample amount of oxygen. However, if the blood supply to an organ is blocked, ischemia, then oxygen delivery is compromised. Under such hypoxic conditions, the Synthase would tend to rotate in the reverse direction and degrade precious ATP. For cells of the heart, the brain and other highly aerobic organs this can be life-threatening. To prevent this from happening, a small polypeptide of variable length, depending on the organism, has been designed to become active and bind to the α3β3 and γ subunits in such a way as to prevent the γ subunit from rotating in reverse and consuming ATP. This polypeptide is called IF1 (inhibitory factor 1).Mitochondrial membranes are optimized to concentrate protons where the ATP synthase motors are. They, in turn, are aligned in pairs to optimize ATP production.An Automatic BrakeUnder hypoxic conditions (low oxygen), the pH of the cell decreases (becomes more acidic), and this causes the IF1 to form dimers which are active and bind to the F1 region of two adjacent Synthases and cross-link them. There is a modest investment of 2 ATP consumed per binding of an IF1, but the savings in ATP can be significant. If conditions return to normal, and the pH rises again, the IF1 dimers form inactive tetramers and higher oligomers. One might compare it to the “hill stopper” function found in many newer cars. This mechanism engages the brakes if it senses that the vehicle is starting to roll backwards down a hill. It stops the wheels, allowing the driver to shift gears without fear of rolling into something behind them.Interestingly, under hypoxic conditions the E coli Synthase is allowed to run in reverse and consume ATP to pump H+s out of the cell; i.e., there is not an IF1-like polypeptide. This is because bacteria use proton gradients for many other purposes, not just the making of ATP. Even under hypoxic conditions the maintenance of these gradients is essential. The bacteria can increase their yield of ATP under these conditions by greatly increasing their consumption of glucose, as ATP can be generated from glucose via the glycolytic pathway which does not require oxygen.The energy demands of eukaryotic cells are greater than prokaryotic cells. Consequently, it is imperative that their mitochondria be supplied with ample amounts of oxygen in order generate the necessary quantities of ATP. While eukaryotic cells also have pathways to generate ATP that do not require oxygen; e.g., glycolysis, these cannot generate the sustained quantities of ATP needed. Any situation that would lead to the consumption of ATP unnecessarily without getting useful work out of it would quickly threaten the life of the cell. Anyone can recognize the “hill stopper” function used in many cars is obviously a designed feature. Similarly, the IF1 is also a design feature in living things used to prevent the unwanted consumption of ATP. It had to be in place and fully functional with the first eukaryotic cells.Good Science Doesn’t Need Evolutionary SpeculationNow that we’ve briefly looked at the Synthase and IF1, and their roles in the cell, let’s look at the article in PNAS.This paper is a good example of scientific research carried out and reported without invoking an evolutionary perspective. No doubt the authors believe in evolution, but they refrained from mentioning it here. This illustrates that important research can be done without a belief in evolution to guide it as nowhere in the article did the authors refer to evolution as a guiding principle. Indeed, no mention of evolution was made.Science, as illustrated by this article, is well equipped to address three questions:What is it? The answer to this question is to provide merely descriptive details as to what it looks like, what kind of molecule is it etc. These authors answered this question quite easily in describing the structure of the bovine IF1; an 84 amino acid polypeptide that binds to the F1 region of ATP synthase and inhibits it.What does it do? This question addresses the function of the object of study. This question was also easily addressed by the authors which explained how this polypeptide binds to the F1 portion of the ATP synthase and how this leads to its inhibition. They discussed how pH, protein concentration and Ca2+ concentration influence the formation of active dimers from inactive tetramers.How does it do what it does? This question asks how the object carries out its function. This question, too, was addressed by the authors. Under low oxygen conditions, such as hypoxia due to ischemia, the pH in the mitochondria decrease, the electron carriers in the inner membrane of the mitochondria are no longer able to pass the electrons onto oxygen and thus become progressively reduced. This leads to a collapse of the proton motive force used to power the synthesis of ATP by the Synthase. Under these conditions, the Synthase tends to do the reverse reaction and degrade ATP to ADP and Pi, thus quickly depleting the ATP concentration of the cell. To prevent this from happening, the lowered pH destabilizes the tetrameric complex of IF1 causing it to be dismantled into the active dimeric form. The dimeric form binds to the F1 portion of the Synthase and interacts with both the α and β subunits as well as the γ Interaction with the γ subunit inhibits its rotation and thus prevents the Synthase from working in reverse to destroy ATP.All too often authors of books and journal articles introduce a fourth question into the mix after addressing the first three in some detail. The fourth question is: How did it come to be? Detailed answering of the first three questions leads the reader to unwittingly have confidence in the answers to this fourth question; they assume that the author(s) know what they are talking about and uncritically accept their answers. What many fail to understand is that in addressing the fourth question one steps out of the arena of science and into the arena of philosophy or worldview. To their credit these authors did not do that, but instead they treated the data and its interpretation as they should have without trying to prop up a belief in evolution.Dr. Anderson’s expertise is in the area of biochemistry and molecular biology. He has taught Biochemistry and helped to direct research projects of graduate and medical students at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX. Dr. Anderson was a post-doctoral researcher in the Molecular Genetics Division of the Department of Ophthalmology at the Houston Neurosensory Center.Dr. Anderson was a member of both the undergraduate and graduate faculty at Lamar University, Beaumont, TX. There he taught and directed the research activities of undergraduates and Masters of Science degree candidates in Biology. Currently he is professor of biochemistry at The Master’s University in southern California.Dr. Anderson’s research interests include structure-function studies of DNA polymerizing enzymes and the synthesis and expression of synthetic human genes in bacterial hosts. He has authored or co-authored several publications in major, peer-reviewed journals. He is a member of the American Chemical Society and Sigma Xi Research Society.(Visited 456 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Read More »

Google Now Distributes Chrome with Built-In Flash Player

first_imgA Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Tags:#Adobe#Browsers#Google#news#web Earlier this morning, Google released a new stable version of Chrome, the company’s increasingly popular browser. This new release for Windows, Mac and Linux is the first stable version of Chrome to be distributed with a built-in version of Adobe’s widely used Flash Player. Just two days ago, Google enabled the built-in version of Flash in the beta channel versions of Chrome, where it had already been available earlier this year, though Google then disabled this feature after a while.Even though Google is a strong backer of the open HTML5 and CSS3 standard, which can replicate a lot of Flash features, the company is also acutely aware that a lot of users and web developers still rely on Flash. When we talked to Bran Rakowski, Google’s product manager and director for Chrome, last month, he noted that Google thinks that by coupling Flash to the browser, Google can ensure that users will run a very recent and secure version of Flash.Don’t Like Flash in Chrome? Just Disable It.If you don’t want to use Flash in Chrome, you can just type “about:plugins” in the address bar in Chrome and disable the plugin.Google’s update mechanism ensures that the browser stays up to date, without any intervention from the user. In addition to this, Google can also test the specific version of Flash it distributes with the browser and ensure that it is stable. With its new crash protection feature in Firefox, Mozilla is also working hard to ensure that crashing Flash content can’t take the whole browser down and Apple and Opera offer a similar feature in their browsers. As CNET’s Stephen Shankland rightly notes, Adobe is also working hard to keep Flash relevant and with the latest version of the Flash Player (10.1), Adobe is also trying to gain a foothold on mobile devices. Google’s own Android operating system is one of the first to support mobile Flash. Related Posts frederic lardinoiscenter_img Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

Read More »

Blogger Arrests in Egypt: This Week in Online Tyranny

first_imgTop Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Before covering the events that have taken place this week in Egypt, I think it’s important to examine those stories that are in danger of being lost to the public’s consciousness because of the dramatic nature of what’s happening in Tahrir Square. Also, in one case, it’s instructive to talk about one case which came about as a direct result of Egypt. In fact, let’s start there, with Syria. Syria lifts Internet bans. Syria is an enthusiastic banner of social media tools. Facebook and YouTube have been banned in that authoritarian country for four years. But now, that ban has been lifted. This is a result of the Tunisian and Egyptian uprisings. Like those countries, Syria has labored under a prolonged tinhorn tyranny; in this case, it has endured two generations of Assad-family rule. Perhaps it’s hoped this relaxation will act as a pressure release. Perhaps it is also hoped that trouble-makers in the Syrian regime will be more easily identified if they are lured out in the virtual open. “It seems like a policy to curry favor with the youth,” Syrian dissident Ammar Abdulhamid told us. The relaxation was accompanied by the announcement of a food subsidy for the needy. Thailand prosecutes another blogger under lèse majesté. The trail for the prosecution of Chiranuch Premchaiporn, the webmaster of the Prachatai website, is ongoing. The charge of lèse majesté is a popular one in Thailand when the government finds anyone it wishes to muzzle. The charge is one of bad mouthing the king and queen, who are very popular in Thailand. It is the Thai equivalent of “insulting the leader” or “insulting religion.” Burma sentences imprisoned blogger to more time. Kaung Myat Hlaing, known by the blogging name of Nat Soe, has been sentenced to an additional ten year sentence on top of the two years he’s already serving. In a secret “trial,” Hlaing was convicted of being part of a poster campaign in support of dissident Aung San Suu Kyi and others. He was deprived of food and water for ten days until he “confessed” to being part of the postering group. China bans “Egypt” as search term. Most of the countries terrified by the people who are rising up in Tunisia and Egypt are Arab ones, like Saudi Arabia. But China is nothing if not forward thinking and accounts of people forcing their governments to account are definitely outre in the Middle Kingdom. So “Egypt” has joined “Tiananmen” and “falun gong” as banned terms on the Chinese Internet. Malaysia announces Internet censorship regime. The Malaysian government is drawing up “guidelines” (read: laws) for online behavior (read: speech). The fact that these rules are in conjunction with the country’s Sedition Act tells you everything you need to know about the motivation behind them. Blogging is popular in Malaysia and several of its more prominent bloggers eventually even ran for office; one of them, Jeff Ooi, becoming a member of the Malaysian parliament, which makes the limitations all the more unfortunate. American university a hot-bed of censorship. No country lives up to its ideals, but when the place where those ideals are most openly trodden on is the country’s university system, you know something’s wrong. The U.S. is big on free speech, enshrining it in the country’s highest law, the Constitution. But over the past decade or more, more and more university systems have outlawed speech that is “offensive.” Offensive speech is the only speech that requires constitutional and legal guarantee of course. The right to say “good morning” or “nice shoes” or “I like sunshine” is not one likely to be abrogated. The University of Massachusetts Amherst has made – I swear I am not making this up – on-campus rallies on “controversial” subjects (vague, much?) subject to a set of regulations that make them difficult if not impossible to stage. That’s right. At this point, it is easier for Egyptians to protest for the end of the Mubarak regime than UM students to protest against the continuation of U.S. presence in Iraq. I would call the administration of the University of Massachusetts a bunch of douchebags but it probably breaks the school’s speech code. This week in Egypt characterized by blogger abductionsSandmonkey abducted, beaten, freed. Well-known Egyptian blogger Sandmonkey was “arrested,” beaten up, then let go. His blog was also hit, “due to problems related to traffic and attacks (many from IPs in Saudi Arabia),” and has been taken offline “temporarily suspended until the problems can be resolved.” That was on the third; a post appeared again on the sixth. Kareem Amer. Kareem was a cause celebre internationally. He served four years in Egyptian prison for criticizing Islam as well as his country’s leadership. Although many Mideast youth defended his right to speak his mind and conscious, he was reviled in the Egyptian press and elsewhere. He was beaten and otherwise ill-treated by his jailers, repeatedly during his time in jail. He went missing around 11:00 p.m. local time on February 6 after leaving Tahrir Square with a friend. Wael Ghonim. The Google middle eastern marketing executive was held blindfolded by Egyptian security forces for 12 days. When he was released, he admitted to being one of the founders of the We are all Khaled Said group, whose Facebook page organized a lot of the protests. His subsequent TV interviews and speeches have rejuvenating a protest movement that showed signs of flagging before Ghonim was released. What do you like about This Week in Online Tyranny? What would you like to see more of? Less of? How can we make it more interesting and more useful to you? Please let us know in the comments.Tahrir photo via Al Jazeera | Assad photo via Wikimedia Commons | Burmese protest photo by Alan Chan | UMass photo via Wikimedia Commons | Kareem photo via Cyberdissidents.org A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Tags:#TWiOT#web center_img curt hopkins Related Posts 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

Read More »