Dudley House Jazz Band presents David Liebman residency

first_img Read Full Story Dudley House and the Harvard University Office for the Arts are proud to present a jazz residency with international saxophone icon David Liebman. The residency will include workshops with Harvard students and a public master class on Wednesday, April 18. The visit concludes with the world concert premiere of The Liebman Concerto, performed by Liebman, jazz pianist Lewis Porter, and the Dudley House Orchestra. Follow the story link below to view the full schedule of events.As one of the leading forces in contemporary jazz, Liebman gained prominence performing in the groups of Miles Davis and Elvin Jones, and he has since exerted great influence as a saxophonist, bandleader, composer, author, and educator.Lewis Porter, a jazz pianist, composer, and author, is a professor of music at Rutgers University and the founder and director of the university’s master’s program in jazz history and research.Liebman and Porter have collaborated on a number of projects, making this residency even more highly anticipated.The Dudley House Jazz Band and Dudley Symphony Orchestra are ensembles of graduate students from Harvard’s Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, as well as Harvard undergraduates and community members.last_img read more

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First floating offshore wind project off Wales moves step closer to development

first_imgFirst floating offshore wind project off Wales moves step closer to development FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Business Green:Wales’ first floating wind project took a major step forward this week, after the Crown Estate awarded seabed rights to developers to build the 96MW demonstration project in the Celtic Sea.If final planning consent is granted, the Erebus project would be installed approximately 44km from the shore and will allow developer Blue Gem Wind – a joint venture between French oil giant Total and developer Simply Blue Energy – to trial floating wind technology in water depths of 70 metres.“Welsh waters are home to a thriving offshore wind industry and as this continues to evolve and mature, innovation will be vital to unlocking a sustainable pipeline of new capacity over the longer term,” head of energy development at the Crown Estate Will Apps said. “With an increasingly busy marine environment, we need to explore new technologies in more diverse and technically challenging areas which is why we are delighted to see the Erebus project take this important step.”Floating wind technology does not rely on traditional fixed foundations and allows wind projects to be installed in deeper waters where wind yields are higher. While in its infancy today, the technology is anticipated to grow rapidly over the decades to come and play a steering role in helping the UK deliver 75GW of offshore wind by mid-century, a target set by government climate advisors the Committee on Climate Change. Research centre Offshore Renewable Energy (ORE) Catapult estimates that the Celtic Sea alone could support up to 50GW of offshore capacity, while supporting thousands of jobs in Wales and southwest England.The leasing deal is one of a number of offshore wind milestones recently marked in Wales by the Crown Estate. Last month, it granted seabed rights for a 106-square kilometre extension to the Gwynt y Mor offshore wind farm off the coast of North Wales. The extension, if consented, will add 576MW of capacity to one of the world’s largest offshore wind farms. And last year, the Crown Estate included the Northern Wales and Irish Sea Bidding Area in the first UK offshore wind leasing round held in a decade. Projects picked in Offshore Leasing Round 4 could be operational by 2030, it said, with projects set to be identified later this year through a competitive tender process.[Cecilia Keating]More: Wales’ maiden floating offshore wind project secures seabed rightslast_img read more

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Olivia Wilde, Jason Sudeikis Showed PDA 2 Months Before Split News

first_imgAs for the House alum, she revealed in January 2019 how the two stayed in sync amid their busy schedules. “We go out and have a lot of fun,” she explained to Us. “We were both really social people when we met, and we didn’t want to give that up when we became parents, so we’re really consistent about our time with them, but we also prioritize a couple of date nights a week.”Scroll down to see photos of Wilde and Sudeikis in the months before Us confirmed their split. This was not the only friendly get-together between the pair in recent months. In fact, they were seen at the beach on multiple occasions throughout September, as they kicked a ball around and went for another dip in the water.Us Weekly confirmed on Friday, November 13, that Wilde and Sudeikis called off their engagement after seven years. The twosome are parents of son Otis, 6, and daughter Daisy, 4.The Booksmart director and the Ted Lasso star began dating in November 2011, and he proposed in 2013.- Advertisement – Happier times? Olivia Wilde and Jason Sudeikis appeared to be as lovey-dovey as ever two months before news of their split broke.The actress, 36, and the Saturday Night Live alum, 45, were spotted swimming in the ocean together on September 9 in photos published by Just Jared. The now-exes laughed and held onto each other for a warm hug during their outing in Malibu. She wore a black one-piece swimsuit, while he sported colorful striped swim trunks.- Advertisement – Sudeikis gave no hint of trouble in October either when he appeared on The Drew Barrymore Show. “You guys seem like a true definition of, like, a beautiful unit,” the talk show host, 45, said, to which he replied, “Well, that’s very nice of you. I mean, Olivia carries the bulk of that beauty within our little duo. And the kids as well.”The actor reflected on his bond with Wilde in August too. “I just had a hunch that the second I kissed her, I wasn’t going to end up ever kissing anyone ever again,” he told Access Hollywood at the time. “So, it was like I had to be careful with it.”- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

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Avian flu can spread among cats

first_imgSep 3, 2004 (CIDRAP News) – House cats can acquire H5N1 avian influenza and pass it on to other cats, Dutch researchers reported this week.Last February two cats in Thailand reportedly died of H5N1 avian flu, but yesterday’s article in the online edition of Science apparently is the first report of cats being experimentally infected with the virus and then spreading it to other cats.Researchers sprayed H5N1 virus into the throats of three cats, according to the report by Thijs Kuiken and colleagues from Erasmus Medical Center in Rotterdam, Netherlands. The virus sample had been isolated from a Vietnamese person who died of the disease.The cats had a fever just 1 day after being exposed to the virus and were excreting virus after 3 days, though in relatively low amounts, the report says. One cat died 6 days after exposure.Two other cats were put in contact with the first group 2 days after the latter had been infected. In addition, the researchers fed infected chicks to three more cats. All of the additional cats became ill with signs like those of the first group.Three other cats were exposed to influenza A (H3N2), a common human strain, and stayed healthy.After the infected cats were euthanized, necropsy showed they had diffuse alveolar damage like that caused by H5N1 infection in humans and monkeys, the report says.The findings suggest that “the role of cats in the spread of H5N1 virus between poultry farms, and from poultry to humans, needs to be re-assessed,” the researchers write. In addition, “Cats may form an opportunity for this avian virus to adapt to mammals, thereby increasing the risk of a human influenza pandemic.”The Dutch report comes about 2 weeks after a Chinese expert on avian flu, Chen Hualan, reported that H5N1 virus had been detected in some pigs in China. The report triggered widespread concern because pigs can harbor human as well as avian flu viruses, creating the potential for the viruses to combine and form a new strain that could spark a human flu pandemic.When H5N1 infection was reported in cats in Thailand last February, the World Health Organization (WHO) said cats had not previously been considered naturally susceptible to flu viruses. At the time, the agency said that pigs, seals, whales, mink, and ferrets were the only mammals besides humans considered susceptible to avian flu viruses. The WHO said only pigs could harbor both avian and human flu strains.Other reports of H5N1 infections in mammals this year included cases last February in a leopard and a tiger in a zoo in Bangkok, Thailand.Kuiken T, Rimmelzwaan G, van Riel D, et al. Avian H5N1 influenza in cats. Science 2004;Sep 2 (early online edition) [Abstract]See also:Feb 20, 2004, CIDRAP News story, “Avian flu jumps to house cats in Thailand”Feb 16, 2004, CIDRAP News story, “Leopard’s death in Thai zoo blamed on avian flu”last_img read more

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Retail: simply the best, say IPD and CBHP reports

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Bernerd closes in on Chelsfield MBO

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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ATP shifts €2.7bn to hedging portfolio after longevity data change

first_imgATP, Denmark’s giant statutory pension fund, has announced it is shifting DKK20bn (€2.7bn) from its investment portfolio into its hedging portfolio to account for the latest change in its longevity projections.More detailed data — and excising US figures from the information used — has meant an adjustment in its longevity model, the DKK768bn pension fund said, with the new projections adding 3.7 years to the expected lifespan of an average newborn boy in Denmark and just under two years to that of a baby girl.Christian Hyldahl, ATP’s chief executive, said: “We have expanded the methodology and for the first time included detailed data, including causes of death, which is enabling us to provide an even more accurate estimate of the development of lifespans.”According to the new projections, 40% of girls born in Denmark now are expected to live to see their 100th birthdays, he said. The main reason for the changed projections comes from the removal of the US from the data, because causes of death there differ significantly from those observed in Denmark, ATP said.The US has historically represented about 40% of the data in the lifetime model, and therefore has had a major impact on life expectancy, it said.Scotland and Luxembourg, meanwhile, which are more like Denmark, are included in the new data set, which – capturing 330 million people – is still very large, the pension fund said.Narcotics-related causes of death are 5.5 times more common in the US than they are in Denmark, and traffic accidents are 3.5 times more likely, according to ATP.As of today, ATP is moving DKK20bn from the bonus potential — which makes up the investment portfolio — to the fund’s large hedging portfolio, which backs the pension guarantees.In accounting terms, the transfer will affect the half-year earnings negatively, but members’ total assets remain unchanged, ATP said.ATP’s hedging portfolio will have DKK677.3bn of assets after the adjustment, and the bonus potential will amount to DKK99.1bn.Back in 2016, ATP added an extra DKK9.9bn to its coverage of guaranteed pensions to account for longer average lifespans observed in the country’s population.last_img read more

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Autism: Traffic pollution linked, study suggests

first_img Share 12 Views   no discussions Heavy traffic in San Diego, CaliforniaThe possibility that autism is linked to traffic pollution has been raised by researchers in California.Their study of more than 500 children said those exposed to high levels of pollution were three times more likely to have autism than children who grew up with cleaner air.However, other researchers said traffic was a “very unlikely” and unconvincing explanation for autism. The findings were presented in the Archives of General Psychiatry journal.Data from the US Environmental Protection Agency were used to work out levels of pollution for addresses in California.This was used to compare exposure to pollution, in the womb and during the first year of life, in 279 children with autism and 245 without. The researchers from the University of Southern California said children in homes exposed to the most pollution “were three times as likely to have autism compared with children residing in homes with the lowest levels of exposure”.They have previously shown a link between autism and living close to major roads.They warn that there could be “large” implications because air pollution is “common and may have lasting neurological effects”.But how?However, other researchers questioned how pollution could alter the brain’s development and lead to autism.Uta Frith, a professor of cognitive development at University College London, said: “It seems to me very unlikely that the association is causal.”She said the study did not “get us any further since it does not present a convincing mechanism by which pollutants could affect the developing brain to result in autism”. One of the challenges with this style of study is that it is difficult to account for every aspect of life which might affect the probability of developing autism, such as family history.It means the study cannot say that autism is caused by traffic pollution, merely that there could be a link between the two. Sophia Xiang Sun, from the University of Cambridge’s autism research centre, argued that cutting pollution would be a good idea anyway.“We know that traffic-related air pollution can contribute to many other diseases and conditions, and it is biologically plausible it also has a role in pathways of autism. “However, whether or not the potential association between autism and traffic-related air pollution exists, reduction of traffic-related air pollution would be good for public health.”By James Gallagher, Health and science reporter, BBC News Share Sharecenter_img HealthLifestyle Autism: Traffic pollution linked, study suggests by: – November 27, 2012 Tweet Sharing is caring!last_img read more

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AquaTrojans Swim On To Victory Over Spartans

first_imgThe AquaTrojans remain undefeated following their away meeting with Connersville on Tuesday.  Girls won 125-82 while the Boys won 144-51. Individual winners include: Reagan Reany – 200 Freestyle, 500 Free; Henry Strotman – 200 Freestyle, 100 Breast; Kyle Goodwin  – 200 IM; Madison Goodwin – 50 Free; Michael Doll – 50 Free; Ayden Ketchem – 100 Fly, 500 Free; Andrew Strotman – 100 Free, 100 backstroke; Madison Goodwin – 100 Breast.  SDMS won 5/6 relays.     SDMS has one more home meet, Monday night vs. South Dearborn. Come out and support the AquaTrojans for the last time this season.     Courtesy of AquaTrojans Coach Brandon Loveless.last_img read more

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