DD BEAUTY AND FASHION: PATRICK GILDEA’S WEEKLY HAIR TIP

first_imgLeading hairdresser Patrick Gildea of The Centre of Excellence begins a weekly column for Donegal Daily today.Each week he will address a specific issue.Anybody with questions or would like a specific issue raised should email us at info@donegaldaily.com and we will pass your queries not Patrick. Would you like a little more understanding when your hairdresser mentions hair Colour names like Ombré, Balayage, Bronde and Highlights?  What is it? Is it for you? It can seem very confusing!“The Centre of Excellence” voted RSVP’s Best Salon in Ireland is here to give you a little insight to help you decide what’s for you.After reading this we promise you’ll know the difference between babylights, lowlights, Ombré and Balayage!Patrick Gildea’s ‘Centre of Excellence’Hair Colouring Techniques Tint & ColourA Tint & Colour is what you want to ask for if you want an all-over hue update. The hair is just one tone from all over. It’s also referred to as a base colour, roots, regrowth.  This is perfect for covering greys or just giving a simple beautiful tone.Easi-Meche/ Foil with ColourQuite simply Easi-Meche with colour is a base colour plus highlights. This two step hair colouring technique makes hair look more natural in the end.BabylightsBabylights are placed around your hairline and on your parting. They don’t go too deep within your hair; they are very subtle and delicate and are a great option for fine hair. The technique is all about taking really small sections- think traditional highlight sections and cut them in half! BrondeIs she blonde or brunette, neither she is Bronde! This colour process takes a woman with dark blonde or light brown hair and adds a layer of highlights. This beautiful colour is best achieved by having lots of your natural base colour showing through, it is also very low maintenance so it is perfect for those who are a little colour shy.BalayageOur Master Colour Experts meticulously paint every strand of hair to create a beautiful Balayage. In French, the word means sweeping. The hair is painted in such a way as to create a graduated, natural-looking effect for the perfect Balayage. LowlightsLowlights are the exact opposites of highlights. They are darker pieces of hair usually reserved for the layers underneath and around the neck. Lowlights are also perfect to visually separate your colour if your highlights have morphed into one solid colour over time.OmbréOmbré is the hair colour trend that will be around for a long time. Every summer women want sun-kissed colour that is dark at the roots and lighter on the tips because it is so low maintenance.  It’s like a beachy brunette, pretty and subtle and is ideal for all ages.Dip DyeDip dye is the most extreme form of Ombré. There is a clear demarcation where one colour ends and the other begins. This high fashion high-contrast technique is definitely for the bolder client, and it looks really gorgeous with rainbow shades.MarbleizingMarbleizing is a method of hair colour placement that melt colours together. It’s all about the proper placement of transitional tones and ribbons of hair colour so it looks beautiful. A redhead for example, may wear a mix of strawberry tones and lily blonde hues for a contrasting cool effect.  Marbleizing involves placing complementary or contrasting hues in such a way that they merge into each other, creating a beautiful end result.Check out some of our favourite celebs with beautiful hair colouring techniques at https://www.pinterest.com/PatrickGildea14/a-z-of-hair-colouring/DD BEAUTY AND FASHION: PATRICK GILDEA’S WEEKLY HAIR TIP was last modified: September 3rd, 2015 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:donegalhair tipPatrick Gildealast_img