Mendoza students aid local Montessori school

first_imgFour Mendoza College of Business students are applying project management skills learned at Notre Dame to a local Montessori school. Juniors Stephanie Boggs, Patrick Cotter, Barbara Smith and Devlin Lynch are using professor Corey Angst’s Project Management class to help Good Shepherd Montessori School increase enrollment. Good Shepherd develops a child’s love of learning through a unique combination of Catholic social teaching and Montessori teaching methods, according to co-founder and director of community relations Felicia Leon-Driscoll. She and her husband, co-founder Daniel W. Driscoll, established the school after studying at Notre Dame. “We’re doing what Notre Dame taught us,” Leon-Driscoll said. “We’re applying the principle of Catholic Social Teaching to our work and our lives, [taking] the preferential option for the poor and [making] the world a place where it is an easier place to be good.” Room exists for improvement and expansion from the 16 students the school had when it opened 10 years ago, Leon-Driscoll said. Good Shepherd wants to increase class size, with the immediate goal of generating enough interest to open a preschool classroom. “Our goal is to attract 20 new elementary-age students and 15 new preschoolers,” Leon- Driscoll said. “That will make a huge difference.” Through the Project Management course, students, including Boggs’ group, will apply what they learn in the classroom directly to real world experience after choosing their clients from a list of interested organizations, Angst said. “We want to send the message to the students that you can do good things, support whatever mission you want, if you generate enough revenue to be able to do those things,” Angst said. Boggs’ group plans to capitalize on Good Shepherd’s strong connection with Notre Dame to help it achieve its goals, she said. “A lot of the parents at the school are connected to the University,” Boggs said. One of those parents is Christina Wolbrecht, professor of political science at Notre Dame. Wolbrecht said she chose Good Shepherd because the school embodies a number of values really important to her family. “The basic teaching philosophy of the school really emphasizes independence, exploration and love of learning,” Wolbrecht said. “What we really like about this philosophy is that it recognizes each child as unique, and lets the child work both at the pace and in the way that works best for [them].” Driscoll, who acts as head of Good Shepherd, said his school embodies the Montessori mission to stimulate children’s minds and natural intellectual creativity. “The first and foremost vision of a Montessori school is to create a world of peace,” Driscoll said. “We want to create an environment that allows a child to be self-confident, directed, motivated and to love the universe so much that it opens a new type of world.”last_img read more

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Full Cast & Creative Team Set for Our Mother’s Brief Affair

first_imgCasting is now complete for the upcoming New York premiere of Our Mother’s Brief Affair, starring the previously announced Tony winner Linda Lavin. Directed by Lynne Meadow, performances will begin on December 28 at Manhattan Theatre Club’s Samuel J. Friedman Theatre. Opening night is set for January 20, 2016.Joining Lavin will be Kate Arrington (Grace, The Qualms) as Abby, Greg Keller (Of Good Stock, Belleville) as Seth and John Procaccino (An Enemy of the People, Incident at Vichy) as Lover/Dad.Written by Richard Greenberg, Our Mother’s Brief Affair follows Anna (Lavin), who, while on the verge of death (again), confesses to her grown children about an affair from her past. Anna fights for her legacy as her family attempts to distinguish fact from fiction.The production will feature scenic design by Santo Loquasto, costume design by Tom Broecker, lighting design by Peter Kaczorowski and sound design by Fitz Patton. Our Mother’s Brief Affair View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on March 6, 2016 Related Showslast_img read more

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Electricity usage fall-off indicates serious recession

first_imgElectricity usage fall-off indicates serious recession FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享New York Times:New data on electricity use in the past three weeks suggest a sharp decline in U.S. economic activity on par with that of the Great Recession. It may already be the deepest downturn since the Great Depression; it is certainly the fastest.These numbers are important because our official statistics can’t keep pace with the abrupt economic changes the coronavirus shutdown has caused. All those closed stores, silenced factories and darkened office buildings are yet to be counted in the government’s official economic numbers, which take months to collect, process and report.But evidence of the sharp economic shift shows up in a large and rapid decline in electricity usage over recent weeks.The numbers come from a new electricity-based measure that Steve Cicala, an economics professor at the University of Chicago, has devised to track the state of the economy and how it changes from day to day. The idea of tracking electricity usage, he says, follows from the observation that most economic activity requires electricity.Mr. Cicala’s results conform with a similar analysis from the U.S. Energy Information Administration and from reports by regional electricity providers. “In terms of this scale of event, I don’t think we’ve had in recent history anything like this hit the grid,” said April Lee, an analyst at the E.I.A.Mr. Cicala said his indicator was useful in times of rapid economic change, adding, “While this isn’t a perfect measure, it certainly helps with filling in the gap so that we can get the most complete picture.”[Quoctrung Bui, Justin Wolfers]More: Another Way to See the Recession: Power Usage Is Way Downlast_img read more

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Uniondale Man Arrested for Crossing Guard Hit-and-run

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A Uniondale man has been arrested for allegedly hitting a female crossing guard who was helping schoolchildren cross a street in Hempstead and fleeing the scene last month, Nassau County police said.Kenechukwu Okoli was charged Tuesday with assault and leaving the scene of an accident.Police said the 59-year-old hit the Hempstead village police crossing guard in the leg while driving a Mercedes Benz northbound on Henry Street shortly before 8 a.m. Nov. 20.The victim, who was knocked to the ground, was taken to a local hospital, where she was treated for contusions to her knee and hip.Okoli will be arraigned Jan. 78 at First District Court in Hempstead.last_img read more

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How A Long Island Couple’s Journey to Help Syrian Refugees Changed Their Life

first_imgA family they met in Greece recently called Latifa via the popular messaging app WhatsApp to update the couple on their progress: They had made it to Germany. But the family wanted more, Latifa says. They want to come to America.Given the rise of Islamophobia in America, which some Muslim rights groups have linked to xenophobic comments uttered during this presidential election season, Latifa told the family that the time wasn’t right. She wishes it were.“Why can’t we open our hearts and our minds?” Latifa says. “I met at least 1,500 to 2,000 people personally. I talked to them, engaged with them. None of them had any sign of being a terrorist or being ISIS or being whatever this creepy Donald Trump is talking about.”“They are desperate for their lives,” she says.Now home for about two months, Colin says he’s disappointed by the European Union’s recent agreement with Turkey to empower authorities in Greece to return refugees arriving there back to Turkey.“To say Turkey is a safe place for refugees is cynical at best and murderous at worst,” Colin exclaims.Colin is not alone in expressing bitter disappointment about the Europeans’ response.“In their desperation to seal their borders, EU leaders have willfully ignored the simplest of facts: Turkey is not a safe country for Syrian refugees and is getting less safe by the day,” said John Dalhuisen, Amnesty International’s Director for Europe and Central Asia, on the human right’s groups website.Thinking back to their own journey, the Woodhouses remembered a young Afghan named Jaweed, whom Latifa first met at Camp Moria, after primal cries thundering out of his tiny body alerted her to his presence.Jaweed had slogged through brutally cold temperatures in the mountains abutting Iran and Iraq. As his family waded through the snow, Jaweed’s unprotected hands had developed severe frostbite. By the time he made it to Camp Moria, each hand was the size of a watermelon.As Latifa comforted the family, Colin grabbed the boy and rushed him to a nearby clinic, where doctors gave him drugs to numb the pain. Eventually he was taken to volunteer-run refugee site called Camp Pikpa, where people with serious maladies can get special care.It was at Camp Pikpa where Jaweed’s family finally had the chance to bid a formal farewell to his grandmother, who had frozen to death in the mountains. Unable to carry her body the whole way, they buried her in the snow and continued their struggle to survive.As for Jaweed, the Woodhouses are not sure what happened to him. One day they went to the camp only to learn that his family had taken him. Apparently the boy’s father was worried that a surgeon would amputate Jaweed’s hands.But with the help of social media, they discovered that a boy matching Jaweed’s description had been admitted to a Doctors Without Borders facility in Athens.Many of the refugees they met along the way shared similar stories of survival or heartbreak. Some said they had no choice to but to flee violence. And now many had dreams of making it to Germany.But the most ambitious request the Woodhouses kept getting they could not fulfill.One refugee after another would ask them: “Could you take us to America?”They had to leave them behind. Now back on LI, the Woodhouses say they’re committed to continuing their work, which includes help establishing a network of translators to help bridge the communication gap at refugee camps. And they can hope that one day they can give the refugees a better answer.“We are strengthened as a nation by the people we open our hearts to and our borders to,” Colin says. “And that’s what’s made America great.” Embed from Getty Images Embed from Getty Images Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York [dropcap]A[/dropcap]s they soared over the Greek island of Lesbos, Colin and Latifa Woodhouse of Great Neck peered through the plane’s tiny window and were struck by the sight of life preservers strewn along the shore of the Aegean Sea—which, as the legend goes, bears the name of an Amazonian Queen swallowed up by the sprawling body of water.It wasn’t until they landed that the Woodhouses truly began to comprehend the enormity of the refugee crisis engulfing Europe. Yet here they were, 5,000 miles from home, ready to take on the greatest migration of people since World War II.“Wow,” Colin recalled as the plane made its final approach, “this is big time.”Like the overcrowded dinghies making the treacherous four-mile trip from Turkey to Lesbos, the discarded life preservers tell the tale of countless lives lost, dreams shattered, children literally ripped from the arms of desperate parents by a ferocious sea that even a Queen of the Amazons was ill-fit to conquer. But for those fortunate to survive the perilous crossing, these life preservers tell a story of hope, perseverance and a future free of fear of bloodshed.In late January, the Woodhouses—Colin a financial advisor and Latifa a retired New York City school teacher and college professor—made the decision to put their own lives on hold and instead donate their time to helping war-stricken refugees seeking a better life in Europe. The couple was not alone: their daughter Alexandra and friend Diane Lombardi, a doctor, also joined in the cause.The Woodhouses echo migrants and organizations on the ground that say they need all the help they can get dealing with this historic refugee crisis.The flow of refugees was initially so overwhelming that Europe was caught flat-footed. According to the International Rescue Committee, 60 million people are displaced worldwide, which is the equivalent the entire population of Italy fleeing their homes. Twelve million of those displaced are from war-ravaged Syria, which has been upended by a five-year-old civil war and the rise of the self-proclaimed Islamic State. Half are children. Like the three-year-old whose body washed ashore on a Turkish beach after his boat overcrowded with refugees had capsized in the Aegean. The photo of his drowned tiny corpse became an iconic image of the ongoing catastrophe.Syrians aren’t the only migrants seeking asylum in Europe or the United States, however. Iraqis, Afghans, Pakistanis, South Sudanese and Nigerians have also absconded from their homelands. The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees said in March that since 2015 more than one million refugees have crossed into Greece.“I had never seen hell, but tonight, it was worse than hell. I thought I died. But I’m alive, I’m alive.”While the European Union and Turkey reached a deal this February to stem the flow of migrants to Greece, much to the dismay of human rights organization, the United States’ response has been largely relegated to providing humanitarian aid on the ground and in Syria, to the tune of $5.1 billion since the conflict started in March 2011.American politicians turned the refugee crisis into a political hot potato last year when more than two dozen US governors said they’d refuse to welcome any Syrians, the majority of whom are Muslim, into their respective states. Still, the Obama administration stuck to its plan to admit 10,000 refugees, a tiny fraction of the millions escaping bloodshed, beheadings, rape, sexual slavery, immolation and countless other atrocities. The country that has been most welcoming to refugees has been Germany, which has accepted more than a million migrants.Colin, for one, is profoundly disappointed in how the US government has responded to hordes of people escaping violence.“We’re a country that was founded as being a safe haven from persecution,” Colin says. “That’s at the very core of the principles of this country, and to turn away an extremely vulnerable population is not only against our legal obligations, but it’s immoral.”The challenge facing Greece is much more complicated because refugees are using the economically strapped nation as a springboard to countries with better job prospects. They have no desire to stay there. At its height last year, 5,000 refugees were arriving in Greece each day.For the Woodhouses, traveling to Lesbos was a no-brainer even though there were plenty of nonprofit organizations already in Greece with the bandwidth to respond to such a calamity. When the Woodhouses boarded their plane on Jan. 24, they had little clue just how much they were needed.What began as a simple humanitarian mission quickly evolved into a spiritual exploration in which the couple met strangers that would become life-long friends, not crazed terrorists, and discovered how the simplest of deeds can be met with boundless expressions of gratitude. For every person they helped, there was an entire family waiting to say thanks. And with each passing day their commitment to the cause never waned, despite periods of disappointment that they could not do more.Here is the story of their journey.AFGHAN HILLThe Woodhouse family from Great Neck traveled to Lesbos, Greece to provide assistance to Syrian refugees in January. From left to right: Alexandra Woodhouse, Latifa Woodhouse and Colin Woodhouse. (Photo credit: Latifa Woodhouse/Facebook)If a photo could speak, the image of a rain-soaked young Afghan girl pressed up against a chain-link fence during a deluge would cry out in pain.“That was the breaking point for me,” Colin tells the Press from inside the couple’s Great Neck home, recalling the moment he felt inspired to act.Instead of wrestling to remove the heart-wrenching image from their minds, the Woodhouses decided to use it as motivation.Looking at the refugees, Latifa saw her own family, who had fled political persecution following the Soviet Union’s invasion of Afghanistan and were granted asylum in the US.“Being a daughter of refugees and going through that with [the] Russian invasion, I knew first hand what it was like,” says Latifa, who met Colin in Afghanistan, where he was teaching at Kabul University.This crisis was personal.So they began to make preparations to fly to Lesbos. The Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Shelter Rock, where Latifa is a member of the board of trustees, approved a $200,000 crisis grant to be split evenly between the Unitarian Universalist Service Committee and the Syrian Medical Staff in Syria. The Unitarian Universalist Service Committee has separately contributed $600,000 to grassroots partners on the ground providing humanitarian aid. The Woodhouses on their own were able to raise $16,000 that they used to deliver aid to refugees in Lesbos. “It’s a fundamental human right that people who are victims of persecution are able to flee their country and enjoy asylum.”Armed with the $16,000 they raised to assist for the relief effort and 250 pounds of Patagonia jackets to hand-deliver to frostbitten and weary migrants, the Woodhouses landed in Lesbos. On average, the mercury in Lesbos typically hovers around 50 degrees in January. But the day after they arrived it was “shockingly cold” on the Greek island, Colin recalls. Smoke billowed over the camp as refugees burnt wood inside their tents to stay warm.Even the Woodhouses couldn’t escape the elements, with winds whipping through their hotel room, sending a shiver through their bodies.With little access to heat—a luxury in Lesbos—the Woodhouses turned to humanitarian work to warm their hearts.What they saw when they took stock of the flood of arrivals was extraordinary.Scores of volunteers would greet refugees as they came ashore, oftentimes offering blankets or a new pair of socks. Many of the incoming dinghies, meant to comfortably hold about 25 passengers, would be brimming with up to 80 people. Those who arrived safely would be directed to a fleet of buses destined for Camp Moria, where the Greek government was stationed to register newly arriving migrants.“We can die in our country or we can die to find safe sanctuary,” Colin says, describing the mindset of those embarking on the dangerous journey to Europe. If safely crossing the Aegean was not taxing enough, refugees would face yet another obstacle as they came ashore: a debilitating language barrier.Latifa, who speaks Farsi, Pashtun and a little broken Arabic, realized her language skills could be a useful tool to help jittery refugees.At one point she spotted a dazed and confused 10-year-old Afghan girl wrapped in a blanket.“We thought, ‘Is she alive or is she dead?’” Latifa recalls.When Lombardi, the doctor, approached the girl, all she could offer was an inaudible mumble. Latifa attempted to speak to the girl in Farsi. It worked.“Khala Jaan,” the girl told Latifa, meaning “Dear Aunt”—a term of endearment.Finally able to connect with someone, the girl opened up.“We read in books about hell, what hell is like,” she told Latifa. “I had never seen hell, but tonight, it was worse than hell. I thought I died. But I’m alive. I’m alive.”The number of people unable to communicate with volunteers because of the lack of translators highlighted just how difficult it was for refugees to continue their journey. If they couldn’t get even basic instructions, Latifa wondered, what were they supposed to do?Then Latifa realized she could be the voice for war-weary refugees who otherwise would not be able to get a word across.At one point she came upon an Iraqi family who had been shuttled to the camp by UN representatives who left them with scant instruction about what to do next.“Why are you sitting here?” she asked the family in their native tongue.The family, one woman explained, had been brought to the camp but were not advised about what to do next. She told Latifa about her sister-in-law’s husband who was slaughtered and all the things they had to leave behind.“We had a house,” the woman said through her tears. “We had everything.”While Latifa was honing her translating skills, Colin and volunteers from other countries were busy building trenches and alleyways to improve the flow of traffic in the camp. The volunteers may have had their own difficulties communicating but once Colin produced a hammer, everyone seemed to know what to do.Colin quickly observed that refugees at Afghan Hill needed wider steps to make access to the medical tent easier. He and other volunteers working on the project dubbed it, “Stairs to Europe.” Colin solved the lack of lighting by going to the local hardware store and purchasing some solar lights, which he helped install.“There was this communication of two guys that can handle a tool,” he says.If translating or building new steps wasn’t possible, the Woodhouses found other ways to contribute. The money they raised helped pay for food, clothes, bus tickets and ambulance rides from Athens to Macedonia.Or they’d do little things to lift up the spirits of children by handing out stuffed animals or soccer balls.“We felt pretty good because we were able to get people on their way,” Colin says.Jillian Tuck, senior program leader for Rights at Risk at the Unitarian Universalist Service Committee, a nonsecretarian global human rights group, said the organization launched a refugee crisis fund almost immediately after the crisis began to unfold, raising $600,000. The money would be funneled out to the UUSC’s partners that operate in the impacted area. The UUSC is currently funding about nine organizations there.“It’s a fundamental human right that people who are victims of persecution are able to flee their country and enjoy asylum,” Tuck says.SNOWY GRAVEIn the wake of the Paris attacks in November that killed 130 people, more than half of the governors in the US reacted angrily at President Obama’s proposal to admit 10,000 Syrian refugees into the country. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, a Republican, even said orphans under the age of five weren’t welcome in the Garden State.In his letter to Obama, U.S. Rep. Peter King (R-Seaford), questioned the vetting process that refugees undergo.“The recent terrorist attacks in Paris have shown the extent of ISIS’s brutality and ability to conduct a major attack in the West,” King wrote. “There is no denying that the current process through which the United States screens and admits Syrian refugees presents ISIS with an opportunity to transport operatives to carry out attacks in the United States.”The hysteria over ISIS fighters potentially masquerading as Syrian refugees led to a since-debunked social media-stoked rumor alleging that the Catholic Church’s humanitarian arm was in the process of building a “tent city” in Amityville to house refugees. At the time there were no applications to bring these refugees to Nassau or Suffolk counties, according to Catholic Charities.What the Woodhouses observed on the ground in Lesbos is very different from the suggestions ricocheting through cable news and the Internet.last_img read more

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Sam Mewis: Man City Women star modelling her game on Kevin De Bruyne | Football News

first_imgOne of the reasons Mewis decided to come to England was the historic club rivalries which do not exist stateside.“Getting to experience the Man Utd rivalry is going to be awesome,” she said.“I’m really excited to experience that part of being here, the rivalries are historic and I look forward to those games.“All the opponents are top competitors so any game is a great opportunity to learn and grow as a player. I’m excited to experience all the opportunities I am getting here.” Mewis described playing for Man City Women as an honour and revealed she does watch De Bruyne to help mould her own game.“I have seen him around a couple of times, but not properly met him, no. I am a fan, who isn’t?,” she told the Women’s Football Show.“He is an incredible player and I would try to model my play on him anytime. It’s been a great honour to be here so far.” – Advertisement – Manchester City Women’s Sam Mewis says she tries to model her game on Kevin De Bruyne.The USA midfielder joined Manchester City this summer as one of a number of high-profile arrivals in the Women’s Super League.- Advertisement – Sam Mewis celebrates her opening goal for Man City in the Women's FA Cup final – Advertisement – Georgia Stanway, Sam Mewis and Janine Beckie of Manchester City celebrate with the Vitality Women's FA Cup Trophy following their team's victory in the Vitality Women's FA Cup Final match between Everton Women and Manchester City Women at Wembley Stadium on November 01, 2020 in London, England.– Advertisement –center_img Manchester City’s Sam Mewis says it was an honour to lift the FA Cup trophy following the victory against Everton at Wembley 0:32 She became just the third American to score a goal in an FA Cup final, following Carli Lloyd and Christian Pulisic, as Gareth Taylor’s squad beat Everton in extra-time at Wembley last weekend.“I’m very fortunate, I keep [the women’s FA Cup winners’ medal] right by my bedside table. It was such an honour to play in a final and win with my team-mates. I feel lucky and fortunate.“It was super exciting, a great ball in from Alex and something we had been working on all week.”Mewis relishing historic Manchester derby 0:32 Manchester City’s Sam Mewis says she’s excited about the rivalry with Manchester United and is looking forward to the Manchester derbieslast_img read more

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Resort-style family retreat on the beach

first_img“I’m going to miss the big front verandah because the whole place can be opened up, which makes it fantastic for entertaining — we’ve had some wonderful dinner parties here,” Ms Hallows said.“We like to sit on the deck with a glass of wine and watch the full moon come up over the ocean.” “We added a big front deck and a new drive, we’ve also done a lot of work to the house underneath,” Rowena Hallows said.“Officially, the home has three bedrooms, but downstairs is a massive area that could be used as anything from another bedroom, study, or office. “The whole neighbourhood helps themselves to lemons and limes,” Ms Hallows said.“JT lives down the road, so he often comes past with the family and gets some off the tree — a lot of people know the house by the fact that it’s the ‘lemon tree house‘.”The mature tropical garden features native cycad plants, and is easy to maintain with a new irrigation system in place.The home is perfect for entertaining, boasting an outdoor pavilion-style bar which connects to the kitchen through a bi-fold window, adding to the breezy coastal atmosphere of the property. This home at 10 Palm Street in Rowes Bay, is new to the market and will be going to auction on June 18.PICTURE this … waking up to views of the ocean, walking across the street for a kayak, and coming back for a chat with Townsville’s rugby league legend Jonathon Thurston while you pick fruit from the neighbourhood lemon tree.This has been life for the Hallows family since they bought the highset home at 10 Palm Street in 2001 — and now it’s back up for grabs. Built in 1954, the house has withstood the test of time, and evolved with the family — having been lovingly restored to keep its character and luxury coastal charm.center_img The family of four have made the best of the home’s beachfront convenience for almost two decades, and now they’re ready for the next chapter.“The only reason we’re moving is because we want to downsize now that our kids have left the nest.“We’ve really enjoyed the lifestyle that comes with living at the home, but now it’s time for another family to come along and let their kids grow up here.” “Then there’s a second huge room under the house which has a laundry and beautiful resort-style bathroom that opens up to the pool.”More from news01:21Buyer demand explodes in Townsville’s 2019 flood-affected suburbs12 Sep 202001:21‘Giant surge’ in new home sales lifts Townsville property market10 Sep 2020The large fibreglass swimming pool was another feature added to the property by the Hallows family, as well as a new kitchen and the lemon tree out the front, which has earned community recognition for the house.last_img read more

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Top news, December 4 – 10, 2017

first_imgTidal Energy Today has compiled the top news from tidal and wave energy industry from December 4 – 10, 2017.Leask Marine reels in Deep Green tidal installation contractMinesto has appointed Leask Marine for the installation of the supporting components and systems for Deep Green tidal energy project off the coast of North West Wales. The work includes the installation of concrete gravity base foundation structure, buoy containing a micro grid and communications system, and power transfer fastening comprising the top joint, tether, bottom joint and subsea umbilical.Hydrotube Energie gets free power from tidal turbineFrench hydrokinetic developer Hydrotube Energie has installed and connected its H3.V2 tidal turbine in Bordeaux, France. Following the installation of the turbine in the Garonne river, the company informed its offices in Bordeaux are running on free power provided by the 50kW tidal turbine since November 2017.Filipino-French joint venture urges for tidal guaranteesSan Bernardino Ocean Power Corp has reportedly encouraged the Philippine government’s plans to establish a single government-run guarantee agency as it would help the company attract investments. The company said that a single state-run guarantee agency would increase its chances of securing international funding that would help it deliver the planned 1.5MW tidal energy project in the country.SeaPower Platform testing underway at FloWaveThe developers behind the Attenuator Cost of Energy Reduction (ACER2) wave energy project have started testing the SeaPower Platform at the FloWave test tank. The testing is being done as part of the second stage of Wave Energy Scotland’s Novel Wave Energy Converter (NWEC) technology development program.Basques to set up offshore renewables research labThe University of the Basque Country/Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Tecnalia and Basque Center for Applied Mathematics (BCAM) have agreed to create a joint research laboratory for offshore renewable energies. The main goal of the initiative is to increase organizations’ international visibility, facilitate technology and knowledge transfer to the Basque industry, and to train future professionals for the offshore renewable energy sector.Tidal Energy Todaylast_img read more

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Kraken Kicks Off OceanVision Project

first_imgKraken Robotic Systems has launched the initial phase of its OceanVision project. Starting in late September, Kraken will deploy its sensors and unmanned underwater platforms to conduct ultra-high definition seabed imaging and mapping on the Grand Banks of Newfoundland and other areas of Atlantic Canada.OceanVision is a three-year, $20 million project focused on the development of new marine technologies and products to enable an underwater data acquisition and analytics as a service business. OceanVision enables the acceleration of Kraken’s strategy from sensors and system sales to becoming an integrated provider of Robotics as a Service (RaaS) and Data as a Service (DaaS).Karl Kenny, Kraken’s president and CEO said, “We are pleased to reach this major milestone and officially launch our OceanVision project. OceanVision™ will result in an end-to-end digitalization solution offering advanced sensors, robots and data analytics as a turnkey service for imaging and mapping of the seafloor as well as seabed assets and infrastructure. “Today, high fidelity data is an absolute requirement for coherent input to machine learning algorithms – otherwise it’s garbage in, garbage out. We are uniquely positioned in the underwater industry as Kraken will build, own and operate the sensor-laden drones; Kraken (and partners) will run the missions; and Kraken (and partners) will analyze the data for our customers.”“We expect recurring revenues from RaaS/DaaS to become a significant part of our future revenue mix and strategic growth. Rapid subsea data acquisition and analytics will make it possible to significantly reduce the cost of obtaining high quality data allowing end-users to make more informed operational decisions in near real-time. The new technologies and services that Kraken will develop within the scope of the OceanVision project are currently not available in a tightly integrated offering in the marine industry.”OceanVision should enable Kraken to further new technology and product development and fine-tune recurring revenue business models. While near-term focus of the project will be the Inspection, Repair, and Maintenance (IRM) segments for offshore energy (oil & gas and wind), OceanVision will also address the requirements of other stakeholders in the fisheries, aquaculture, ocean science and underwater defense industries.last_img read more

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Kabankalan sting op nets ‘shabu,’ gun

first_imgAside fromsuspected shabu, a .22-caliber revolver with five live bullets, two cellphonesand cash which amounted to P1,521 cash were recovered. BACOLOD City – Thirteensachets of suspected shabu and a firearm were seized in a sting operation inBarangay 6, Kabankalan City, Negros Occidental.  They werecaught in an entrapment operation around 2 p.m. on Nov. 19, the report added. The 34-year-oldresident Regie Liper and 32-year-old Ronel Laberos yielded the suspectedillegal drugs valued at around P420,000, a police report showed.    Liper and Laberoswere detained in the custodial facility of the Kabankalan City police station,facing charges./PNlast_img read more

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