Watch Bob Weir Join Jackie Greene For Sweetwater Music Hall Celebration

first_imgLast night marked a performance from Jackie Greene, who set up shop at the Sweetwater Music Hall in Mill Valley, CA. The guitar slinger delighted with songs from his newest release, before welcoming an old friend to the stage: Bob Weir.The Grateful Dead guitarist made his appearance as part of a birthday party celebration, sticking around to perform a handful of songs for the crowd. He joined in for a cover of the Temptations’ “Standing On Shaky Ground,” which you can watch below, courtesy of Adrienna Monique:Weir stayed on for “Digging A Hole” and “Sugaree,” as well as an encore version of “West L.A. Fadeaway.” Alex Nelson also joined in the fun, only adding to the magic.Here’s “Sugaree,” via Matthew Kann:Check out the full setlist below:Setlist: Jackie Greene Band at Sweetwater Music Hall, Mill Valley, CA – 3/21/16Set: The King Is Dead, I’m So Gone, Farewell So Long Goodbye, A Moment Of Temporary Color, Spooky Tina, Mexican Girl, Light Up Your Window, When You’re Walking Away, By The Side Of The Road, Shaken, So Hard To Find My Way, Standing On Shaky Ground*, Digging A Hole*, Sugaree*Encore: West L.A. Fadeaway** – w/ Bob Weir & Alex Nelsonlast_img read more

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PHOTOS: The Revivalists & The Marcus King Band In ATL

first_imgOn December 15 and 16, The Revivalists took over the amazing Tabernacle in Atlanta, GA for two nights of sonic bliss. With The Marcus King Band on the bill as support, fans were treated to back-to-back nights of The Deepest Dream Tour-closing madness. Check out the full gallery below, courtesy of photographer Emily Butler.The Revivalists will celebrate New Year’s Eve in their hometown of New Orleans at The Orpheum Theater on December 29, 30, and 31. For more information on The Revivalists, head to the band’s website.The Revivalists | The Tabernacle | Atlanta, GA | 12/16/17 | Photos by Emily Butler Load remaining imageslast_img read more

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Harvard Gazette’s top stories of 2018

first_imgFollow Harvard on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram to see more great moments from the past year. Milestones, innovation, analysis, and inspiration from the University and beyond Harvard Gazette’s top stories of 2017 Related The Year in PicturesThese were the stories that were too big for just words“The center in the crossroads”Students and staff embraced Harvard’s new Smith Campus Center.,“The ending as beginning: Commencement ‘18”There were cheers and tears at the 367th Commencement ceremony.,“Beauty in the eye of the microscope”by Rachel TraughberNew tools helped Harvard researchers display the world in unexpected and compelling ways.,“Playing The Game, both past and present”by Jon ChaseThe celebration transcended generations when Harvard beat Yale at Fenway Park.,“Catching up with the class of ‘48”by Jon ChaseA wonderful look at the lives of alumni at 90 and beyond.,Deep DivesThese were the in-depth stories that our readers couldn’t put down“‘What the hell — why don’t I just go to Harvard and turn my life upside down?’”by Colleen WalshPart of the Experience series, then-President Drew Faust opened up about family, history, and the illness that urged her forward.,“Onward and upward, robots”by Alvin PowellFirst in a series on cutting-edge research at Harvard, researchers showed off the unique approaches they are taking with robotics.,“‘The greatest gift you can have is a good education, one that isn’t strictly professional’”by Liz MineoHoward Gardner talked about his secret to a successful career and a happy life.“A summer of service to cities”by Christina PazzaneseThe Bloomberg Harvard City Leadership Initiative is working to help city officials be more effective and train the next generation.,“‘To be horrified by inequality and early death and not have any kind of plan for responding — that would not work for me’”by Alvin PowellPaul Farmer talked about making impoverished lives his life work.,Social MediaThese were the stories that we had to sharecenter_img As a new year approaches, we look back at some of the Gazette’s most-read and best-loved stories of 2018.Campus LifeThese were the stories that made us laugh, cry, and connect to each other“Facing the future, Lewis and Faust see reason for hope”by Alvin PowellIn a time of uncertainty, Congressman Lewis and then-President Faust urged the graduating class to rise to the challenge of a world in need of leadership.,“Harvard names Lawrence S. Bacow as 29th president”After an extensive search supported by faculty, students, staff, and alumni, Harvard welcomed its 29th president.,“Not just a humanities cat”by Rose LincolnAfter four years at Harvard, Remy the cat has had pretty much the full Harvard experience.,“It’s Housing Day, with snowballs”by Aaron GoldmanFirst-year students battled the snow to learn where they’d live next.,“When her life is over, she’ll have lived”by Jill RadskenHarvard senior Elsie Tellier uses courage, strength, sadness, and compassion to respond to her lethal disease.,“Spreading the word on college admissions”by Liz MineoHarvard students developed a college admissions guide to help others traverse the competitive path.“Bringing a dying language back to life”by Brigid O’RourkeThrough Harvard’s Project Teach program, an instructor is teaching seventh-graders the origin of the Gullah language.,“Mourning Devah Pager”by Jill RadskenHarvard mourned the loss of Devah Pager, an academic “force of nature,” remembered for her trailblazing scholarship and extraordinary mentorship.,From the LabThese were the stories that explored the world around us and the mysteries within us“When science meets mindfulness”by Alvin PowellThe first in a series that looked at the expanding research on mindfulness and stress.,“How fast can we run?”by Alvin PowellThe chair of the Department of Human Evolutionary Biology discussed the body’s triumphs and limits.“Microbes by the mile”by Deborah BlackwellHarvard researchers shared the beauty of the microscopic world.,“Five healthy habits to live by”by Karen FeldscherHarvard Chan researchers looked at over 25 years of data to get a better idea of which habits are the healthiest.,“Songs in the key of humanity”by Peter ReuellA Harvard study questioned whether music is more universal than we previously thought.,The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. Top stories of 2016 Looking back at some of our most-read articles of the yearlast_img read more

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HBO Sets Premiere Date for Bryan Cranston-Led All the Way

first_img Hot on the heels of Mama Broadway, the HBO film adaptation of All the Way will premiere on May 21. Headlined by Bryan Cranston, reprising his Tony-winning role of Lyndon B. Johnson, the film will also star Tony winner and Oscar nominee Frank Langella as Senator Richard Russell. Jay Roach directs the small screen take on the drama by Robert Schenkkan, which won the 2014 Tony for Best Play.In addition to Cranston and Langella, the movie will feature Bradley Whitford (another familiar face to White House dramas) as Hubert Humphrey, Melissa Leo as Lady Bird Johnson and Anthony Mackie as Martin Luther King Jr.Pulitzer Prize winner Schenkkan penned the screenplay. The show begins with the Kennedy assassination and details the first year of Johnson’s presidency, focusing on his involvement with the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Bryan Cranston in ‘All the Way'(Photo by Evgenia Eliseeva) View Commentslast_img read more

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Appalachian shale producer EQT Corp. may take $1.8 billion fourth quarter charge

first_imgAppalachian shale producer EQT Corp. may take $1.8 billion fourth quarter charge FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Natural Gas Intelligence:EQT Corp. said in a regulatory filing on Monday it may incur a steep one-time impairment of up to $1.8 billion for the fourth quarter due to a new development plan and low natural gas prices.Under a new management team that took over last July, the nation’s largest natural gas producer is aiming to aggressively cut debt and realign operations to boost performance and value. Management has outlined plans to cut debt by $1.5 billion by mid-2020, which it expects to achieve with a mix of initiatives, including asset sales.The monetization, along with a decrease in the value of its reserves and the writedown of unproven properties no longer in the development plan, is likely to result in a 4Q2019 impairment of $1.4-1.8 billion, the company said in a Form 8-K filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. The figure could change as year-end results are finalized.Fourth quarter production is expected to average 370-375 Bcfe, or toward the high-end of previously announced guidance, according to preliminary estimates. The company produced 394 Bcfe in the year-ago period and 381 Bcfe in 3Q2019. It is guiding for 1.45-1.50 Tcfe of production this year, roughly flat to 2019 levels.Averaged realized prices are also expected to average $2.51-2.56/Mcfe in 4Q2019, or below the 4Q2018 average of $3.13/Mcfe.EQT also said Monday it would offer two new series of fixed rate senior notes. Moody’s Investors Service downgraded the company following Monday’s filing.[Jamison Cocklin]More: Appalachian heavyweight EQT warns of $1B-plus impairment for fourth quarterlast_img read more

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Congressional Field Trip: New Legislative Group Paddles the Clinch

first_imgA caucus of congressmen engaged in teasing banter, occasionally splashing each other with their paddles, as they kayaked down the Clinch River in mid-July.The afternoon paddling adventure in St. Paul was part of the Virginia Legislative Sportsmen’s Caucus’ first weekend field trip (they’d had a muddy ATV roller coaster ride through some of the town’s 100 miles of mountain view trails that morning), and it was up to The Nature Conservancy’s Clinch Valley program director to make a good impression.Between the joking and the fun, Brad Kreps interjected St. Paul’s selling points, highlighting the Clinch River and soon-to-come State Park—hopefully with the congressmen’s support.“The Clinch is a national treasure,” Kreps said. “It has one of the highest populations of rare species in the country.”The Field Trip—Why St. Paul?Less than 1000 people live in St. Paul, Virginia. So why did the caucus decide to take their very first field trip to a town barely one square mile in size?The answer—Kreps. Taking the caucus paddling on the Clinch River created the opportunity to discuss the national importance of the river and the economical opportunities the recreational hotspots in the area have to offer.“We want to have a conversation about recreation that’s good for the economy and the environmental resources we have in the region,” he said. It’s important “to protect and restore the river…that can connect with supporting local communities.”St. Paul’s been looking for new business opportunities, since its coal mining industry isn’t what it used to be.“Production and jobs associated with the coal industry have been on the decline,” Kreps said. “There’s this need for economic diversification.”The Western Front Hotel—where the caucus’ members stayed during their trip—and the Clinch Life Outfitters saw the opportunity to profit from St. Paul’s surrounding natural treasures.General manager of the hotel, Catrina Mullins, said the boutique place, which opened this year, is planted in a hotspot for recreation, located right by the river.“I’m self-proclaiming this as a resort destination,” she said.For Donna Johnson, owner of the river outfitters, business has doubled this year. She said the company went from having one bus to two, and is looking to get a third soon.“We’re always booked,” she said.State Sen. Emmett Hanger, R-Augusta, said he, along with all those who participated in the field trip, are interested in supporting the construction of the Clinch River State Park. The General Assembly already approved $2.5 million for the first phase of the park in 2016.The ParkKreps said the finished park will run along the Clinch, which begins in Tazewell County and travels through Russell, Wise, and Scott counties and ends up in Tennessee.“Our vision is to have anchor properties 300 to 400 acres in size on the river large enough to eventually have things like campgrounds and visitor centers,” he said.These properties will be prime locations to use on multi-day paddling trips.“If there’s an opportunity with [the State Park], we’ll work with it,” Johnson said.Johnson’s outfitter company and the hotel are only two examples of jobs that will benefit from the State Park.During the construction phase, they’ll be engineering, architectural and carpentry jobs, then the permanent park staff and seasonal employees, Kreps said.And they’ll be “indirect economic benefits and jobs related to the park…when people coming to visit buy food, fishing licenses, tackle, gas…” he said.mussels in the clinch riverThe RiverAfter their paddle along the river, the congressmen rested their sore muscles while they learned about the mussels they’d help release a little later.More than 40 species of mussels call the river home. Twenty of those are listed as federally endangered.Take the golden riffleshell—the Clinch River is the only place in the world where it can be found. Its species became almost completely extinct after an oil spill that leaked into the river in 1998.Earlier this year, 700 captively grown golden riffleshells were released into the Clinch River in an effort to save the species. The animals are key to water cleanliness and quality.“The mussels are cleaning the water for free for us,” Kreps said.Not only are mussels little Brita filters, but they’re also full of fascinating personality.“Mussels have developed an ingenious way to attract fish species,” Kreps said. “Some of the mussels will create an appendage off of them that looks like a little fish.”A host fish will bite on the appendage as if it’s bait, he said. That’s when baby mussels explode off of their mother and attach themselves to the fish like parasites.The parasites “live and grow on the fish for a period of time,” he said. “That’s how [mussels] move around a lot.”They use the fish as a transportation device, developing a key relationship between the two creatures.There are also more than 130 species of fish in the Clinch, according to Kreps.“Most of the fish are the little guys—shiners, sculpins, darters—they’re incredibly beautiful,” he said.The Caucus—What’s Behind the Members’ Love for the Outdoors?“When you’re behind a screen 24/7, it’ll get you out,” said Del. Chris Hurst, D-Blacksburg. “Out here…I don’t have to look at my phone. I can’t answer…political drama.”For Hurst, the outdoors is an escape from a job that seems to follow him almost everywhere he goes. For Del. James Edmunds, R-Halifax, it’s a passion—he grew up on a farm and hunted and fished often.“I have an explorers heart,” he said.Speaking to the caucus’ field trip, Edmunds said, “We get to hang out in areas we talk about but never see.”The caucus is made up of bi-partisan delegates and senators who share the common goal of protecting and promoting outdoor sports in Virginia, such as hunting and fishing.“It’s a non-partisan issue,” Del. Todd Pillion, R-Washington, said, grinning at Democratic Party’s Hurst. “Everyone can support outdoor recreation.”last_img read more

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4 consumer auto purchase trends to watch to make you a smarter lender

first_img 27SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Crystal Bullard As Manager of Business Development for SWBC’s Financial Institutions Group, Crystal Bullard works with lenders to increase their interest and non-interest income through programs such as AutoPilot Lending and … Web: https://www.swbc.com Details A new record was set in 2016 when 17.6 million cars and trucks were sold in the United States, marking the seventh consecutive year of increased auto sales, according to Automotive News. 48,000 of our friends, neighbors, and credit union members are buying a vehicle every day. While some may have a great car buying experience, a majority find the process to be a hassle. When asked if they prefer the current car buying experience as is, or would like to see significant changes, only 17 out of 4,002 consumers prefer the status quo, according to Autotrader’s Car Buyer of the Future study. The entire car buying process is in flux, and with it, consumer needs are constantly evolving when it comes to purchasing a vehicle. As an auto lender, here are some things to keep in mind when it comes to auto loan purchase trends. Competitive auto loan rates are not the only thing that will help your institution remain top of mind when consumers are ready to finance a vehicle. Check out these four trends that will help you stay in tune with consumers and the marketplace, making you a smarter, more efficient, and more prolific lender.Convenience of Online ShoppingConsumers have become accustomed to finding the easiest, quickest way of doing something. Instead of running to the grocery store, you can now have your groceries delivered to your front door. Bills are paid online, without the need for stamps, envelopes, or even checks. Tasks that used to be completed within set business hours or at a certain location, like banking, are no longer bound to a specific time or place. Car buying is no different. The traditional process of visiting dealerships, negotiating a price, and dealing with the F&I department sounds like a headache most consumers don’t want to deal with. Many are looking at new options to purchase a vehicle online. This new (and many say improved) method of car buying is on the rise and likely to keep increasing each year. Keep an eye on car buying services such as Carvana, Shift, Beepi, and Tread, where a consumer can locate a vehicle, get an offer for financing, obtain products such as GAP and warranty, and even have the vehicle delivered to their home, complete with their choice of bow color. 80% of consumers are already browsing and doing their vehicle research online, according to an Accenture study, and as the tools become available to make the entire process even more convenient, more and more of the traditional car buying process will fall out of favor. Online shopping gives busy consumers the ability to shop with ease right from the palm of their hand.Changing Consumer DemographicsRemember when we were all focused on marketing to Baby Boomers? This generation once held a majority of the wealth in the U.S., and everyone wanted a piece of it. Well, the Boomers have met their match–here come the Millennials. In 2015, according to Goldman Sachs, there were 77 million Baby Boomers, and 92 million Millennials. Although, at that time, millions of Millennials were still unable to legally drive, 35% of all new auto loans were made to Millennials, according to Dealertrack. With so many options for getting from point A to point B, such as carpooling and ride sharing services, where it was once thought that Millennials weren’t interested in owning a vehicle, the data shows otherwise. According to Wards Auto, Millennials are only now entering their peak car-buying years. A possible reason for an increase in Millennial vehicle purchases could be the convenient lending and payment options that have been brought to the table. Eco-Friendly VehiclesIn recent years, the variety of eco-friendly vehicle options for consumers to choose from has increased. There are more fuel-efficient and environmentally friendly vehicles on the road now than ever before. From December 2010 to August 2016, Americans purchased a half-million battery electric vehicles and the market is on pace to double that number within just a few years. With gas prices not expected to decrease significantly, you can expect more consumers to jump on the eco-friendly bandwagon in the coming years. Marketing to this trend can be as simple as featuring eco-friendly vehicles in your advertisements, or as focused as developing cash back incentives or special rates for consumers looking for a hybrid or electric vehicle.Evolving TechnologyFrom smartphones to smart homes and everything in between, consumers expect that high-tech features will also carry over to the vehicles that they drive. Consumers have been trained to look for the newest model for enhancements and upgrades that make a new purchase worthwhile. With this being said, many consumers are opting to purchase new cars due to the fact that the older models don’t come equipped with newer technology. With upgrades like an eye-tracking system that detects when a driver is distracted coming to the market this year, along with advanced safety features that prevent common driving mistakes such as unsafe lane changes, consumers can justify their new purchase by showing the improved safety of their new car. But with all these new “bells and whistles,” vehicles with these upgrades become more expensive to purchase and more expensive to repair. Make sure your staff is ready to discuss GAP coverage on any new vehicle purchase, as well as knows the cost of repairing some common safety features such as adaptive cruise control sensors, 360 camera systems, and blind spot monitoring systems. That new technology can be costly to repair, and the investment in major mechanical protection now can pay off with just one visit to the shop. It’s obvious that consumers know what they want and what they want is convenience, choice, and the newest technology. In today’s environment, as more consumers are choosing the non-traditional way of purchasing and financing a vehicle, watching the market and adapting to the trends is key. These trends will continue to spill into the auto lending market giving your credit union the opportunity to capitalize on them to meet member needs, while boosting your auto loan growth. Listen to what consumers want and adjust accordingly. With a tool like AUTOPAY from SWBC, credit unions can gain access to more than 80 million new consumers through an automated, fully mobile direct lending platform. Click here to learn more about AUTOPAY!last_img read more

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Binghamton University ‘pauses’ in-person classes for two weeks

first_imgThe university made the decision after a surge in coronavirus cases in Broome County and infections in the campus community drew closer to the state’s threshold. VESTAL (WBNG) — Binghamton University President Harvey Stenger informed the community that all classes will go remote for a period of two weeks, beginning Thursday, October 8th. New York State mandated that any college or university that has 100 total positive cases must go remote for two weeks. As of this article, the university has 89 confirmed positive cases. Club sports, intramurals, and athletics activities will be on pause for two weeks. “All core operations of the University will remain open and employees should continue their current work arrangements,” a notice from Binghamton University stated. The residence halls and libraries will remain open, as will classrooms that are used as “student study spaces”.center_img Counseling and other services will remain available. To see the university’s COVID dashboard, click here. While the campus goes into remote learning, the campus will also remain open. The university will change the way it serves campus meals by transitioning the dining experience to take-out only.last_img read more

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PREMIUMEnergy watchdogs call for less coal, more renewables in PLN long-term power plan

first_imgIndonesia energy-mix PLN coal renewable-energy greenpeace IESR Energy watchdogs have called on state-owned electricity company PLN to slash coal consumption and boost renewables usage in the company’s upcoming 2020-2029 electricity procurement plan (RUPTL).The experts urged Indonesia’s top electricity company to further cut back on coal-fired power plants, particularly those whose construction has been stalled due to COVID-19 pandemic. They urged PLN to focus on developing green energy plants instead.“Developing coal plants that have a 40-year lifespan will lock out opportunities for renewables to develop in Indonesia,” said energy and climate change researcher Adila Isfandiari of environmental advocacy group Greenpeace Indonesia.Adila is among many energy observers, including those from Global Energy Monitor (GEM), the Institute for Essential Services Reform (IESR) and the Institute for Development of Economics a… Facebook Forgot Password ? Linkedin Google Topics : LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Log in with your social accountlast_img read more

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UK set to confirm collective DC as future pension in DA debate

first_imgCollective defined contribution (CDC) schemes are set to be selected as a future pension scheme option in the UK, with legislation to be put forward in the next Parliament.Reports from national newspaper, The Sunday Telegraph, suggested the implementation of CDC will be laid out in Wednesday’s Queen’s Speech, which sets out the legislative agenda for the next Parliamentary session.In the launch of a government consultation on DA and greater risk-sharing in November 2013, the government name-checked CDC and the Danish ATP model as two potential outcomes.The response to the consultation has not yet been published, although it was expected earlier this year. Pensions minister, Steve Webb, has long been a supporter of CDC, and with the legislative introduction set to be announced, CDC could be left as the sole definition of DA.The newspaper suggested CDC legislation could be in place by 2016.However, its implementation could be complex as the first round of auto enrolment will almost be complete by then, and, uncertainty over how, and if, it complements recent changes to DC landscape announced by the Treasury.Aon Hewitt, the consultancy, and support of CDC in the UK, said its attraction outweighs that of other potential DA designs and defined benefit (DB), due to the lack of guarantees.On how CDC would fit into the post-2014 Budget DC environment, partner at Aon Hewitt, Matthew Arends, said individuals would still want to generate an income in retirement, such as that provided by CDC.“There will be a need for some form of income generating solution from at least part of members’ DC pots to replace income that previously would have been provided by an annuity.“We can expect a proliferation of market innovation to fill this need. However, many of these new options will expose members to increasingly complex decumulation decisions.“CDC plans have a big role to play because they are pooled vehicles and so avoid the need for members to take investment decisions,” he said.“We envisage that many employers will take the opportunity to use CDC as a core part of retirement savings to provide an income – in addition to fully flexible DC cash savings,” he added.The debate over CDC’s implementation has split the industry, with previous debates highlighting Aon Hewitt as strong supporters and Mercer suggesting the government should focus on reducing stringent DB requirements.Towers Watson said CDC would require a “radical” change to pensions legislation in the UK, and employers would refrain from taking on additional risk voluntarily.Colin Richardson, client director at independent trustee firm PTL, said CDC’s major benefit, even post-Budget, is still its longevity pooling.“There are other advantages to CDC of course in relation to potential greater predictability of future pensions and greater pension amounts,” he added.“However, great care is needed in comparing the potential pension amounts as most CDC scheme studies were performed before the March 2014 budget and are thus based on outdated comparisons with constrained DC schemes.”CDC was first touted as an option for UK employers in 2009.A study into its feasibility, by the then Labour Government, said the legislative changes required were too complex and there was a lack of interest from employers, resigning CDC to the legislative scrap heap.Current Labour MP Rachel Reeves, and shadow work and pensions secretary, said sharing risk and rewards across generations, such as in CDC, appeals to the principles of the country.“We need to be clear that such schemes do expose people to a different set of risks and this makes it all the more important that they are subject to robust governance mechanisms,” she said in a speech last week.“Opening the way to CDC schemes makes it all the more important the government takes up our call to impose a legal requirement on all pension scheme providers to prioritise the interests of savers above those of shareholders – policed, where possible, by independent trustees.”last_img read more

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