A Deaf chief executive has won the right to questi

first_imgA Deaf chief executive has won the right to question the government’s “discriminatory” cap on Access to Work (AtW) payments in the high court, in the latest legal challenge to the Department for Work and Pensions’ (DWP) disability policy agenda.David Buxton, chief executive of Action on Disability in London, is one of many British Sign Language (BSL)-users who have been hit by the imposition of the cap on payments made by the AtW scheme, which provides disabled people with funding to pay for some of the extra disability-related expenses they face at work.Now the high court has ruled that Buxton’s legal challenge can go ahead, with his lawyers set to argue – under the Equality Act 2010 – that the cap breached the public sector equality duty and subjected him to indirect discrimination.His judicial review case is being funded by the Equality and Human Rights Commission.It comes just weeks after another legal challenge forced work and pensions ministers into a climbdown over new personal independence payment rules that were found by the high court to be unlawful and “blatantly discriminatory”.And earlier this month, a terminally-ill man, TP, won permission for a judicial review of the financial impact of the introduction of universal credit on disabled people with high support needs, through the loss of the severe disability premium and enhanced disability premium.Disability News Service reported last year how Buxton had been told that AtW would only provide him with enough support to pay for interpreters three days every week.He began his full-time job in London in May, and was immediately hit by the cap, which was introduced for new AtW claimants in 2015 and is due to affect existing claimants from April this year.Less than three months ago, the government launched its 10-year work, health and disability strategy, which aims to increase the number of disabled people in work by one million by 2027.But campaigners believe that the AtW cap, which currently limits the annual support that individuals can be awarded under the scheme to £42,100 a year, has had a disproportionate impact on the job and career prospects of Deaf BSL-users and disabled people with high support needs.They say it places them at a disadvantage in the workplace, effectively removing employment support from those with the most complex needs and placing them at a disadvantage when trying to get into, stay in and get on in paid work.Buxton (pictured, left) said: “As a chief executive, it cannot be right that my career is impacted by limiting my language and communication needs because I am Deaf and use BSL.“There is some way to go yet but the support from the Equality and Human Rights Commission and my legal team are signs that this is a case which could challenge and change existing practices, decisions and future provision.”  Buxton’s case is being supported by Inclusion London’s Disability Justice Project, and the StopChanges2AtW campaign.Ellen Clifford, Inclusion London’s campaigns and policy manager, said: “We’re pleased that permission for judicial review has been granted as we see the cap as clear discrimination, effectively barring people with certain impairments from the same employment opportunities as others.“We hope that the case will be heard as soon as possible because Deaf and disabled people are already suffering under the impact of the cap, with Access to Work writing to ask to meet with employers to look at what aspects of a person’s job can be taken away to meet the reductions in support.“However, the cap is only one aspect of the many current failings with Access to Work.“Limits to individual awards, hostile questioning by advisors, and financial and administrative errors on an alarming scale are all adversely impacting on thousands of Deaf and disabled people and the interpreters and personal assistants we employ on a daily basis.“It’s a scandal that would have received much more attention had the government not at the same time been denying disabled people’s basic human rights through benefit cuts and the social care crisis.”Buxton’s solicitor, Anne-Marie Jolly, from Deighton Pierce Glynn, said: “Mr Buxton’s claim makes the case that the Access to Work cap discriminates against Deaf and disabled people and fails to take account of the impact on them of such a regressive move.“The cap perversely impacts on those with the most demanding jobs and highest support needs, the overwhelming majority of whom are Deaf BSL-users, preventing them and their employers or businesses from reaching their fullest potential.” Research commissioned by Inclusion London, and published in October, described AtW as “a cornerstone of the movement for equality and civil rights for Deaf and disabled people in the UK” but found that the future of the AtW scheme was in jeopardy because of “bureaucratic incompetence” and a cost-cutting drive to reduce people’s support packages.DWP said it could not comment on an ongoing legal 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Salford City Reds U20s 28 v 14 St Helens U20sBy Gr

first_imgSalford City Reds U20s 28 v 14 St Helens U20sBy Graham Henthorne, Team ManagerThe Academy U20s got their season off to the worst possible start with a below par performance at a chilly Willows on Friday night.Coach Ian Talbot fielded a team consisting of players with both Super League experience and U18s qualifiers but one that was more than capable of coming away with the points.The Saints started well putting the home side under a lot of pressure. Ben Karalius’ kick on the last rebounded to a Saints for a second set on the home line. First Carl Forster and then Scott Hale were held over the line before Karalius’ neat grubber was pounced upon at the side of the posts by Andrew Dixon for the opening score.However, poor handling let the City Reds back in almost straight away. A knock on and penalty by Dixon put the Reds on the charge and the centre scored wide on the left.Minutes later and the handling again let the Saints down with yet another knock on early in the tackle count putting them under pressure. A chip to the corner from Man of the Match Marc Sneyd caught for the try by his winger put the City Reds ahead.Sneyd’s 40/20 brought the best out of the Saints goal line defence as Nathan Ashe and Josh Jones combined to bundle the winger into touch saving a try.The Saints enjoyed a purple patch on the half hour as Karalius started to carve the home side up down the middle. Twice he broke through putting Matty Ashurst away. First time he was caught at the line and the ball was lost. Secondly he found Ashe on his inside and his ball was put down with the line begging by debutant Adam Swift.But two tackles later the Reds were done for a forward pass and from the resultant scrum Swift made amends putting Adam Barber into the corner to give the Saints back the lead.A knock on from the kick off put the 20s straight back under pressure and the big substitute prop barged over at the posts to send the home side in ahead at the break.The second half quickly turned into a war of attrition. Something different was required and on the hour mark Swift supplied it with a chip over the defensive line to the right corner. Dan Brotherton used his height and reach to get to the ball and stretched out to level the scores.Keep it tight and put them under some pressure I hear you cry. As before this evening the 20s found it difficult to turn the screw and a simple penalty for holding down gave the home side the lead again.On the next set Sneyd took the game away from the Saints chipping over the line for his winger to take and cruise to the sticks. A final try to the scrum half gave the Reds a slightly inflated score but in truth the Saints were well beaten in the end.Adam Swift did well on debut and Josh Jones and Matty Ashurst never gave up but too many players didn’t have their game heads on, an attitude that will have to change drastically and quickly before the local derby with the Wire next week.Teams:Salford:1. Jack Holmes, 2. Adam Clay, 4. Andy Morris, 3. Max Wiper, 5. Richard Lepori, 6. Niall Evalds, 7. Marc Sneyd, 8. Matthew Haggerty, 9.Gareth Owen, 10. Alex Davidson, 11. Jordan Walne, 12. Toby Adamson, 13. Will Hope.Subs: 14. Craig Noon, 15. Jon Ford, 17. Callum Marriott, 18. Daniel Haney.Saints:1. Nathan Ashe, 2. Dan Brotherton, 3. Josh Jones, 4. Tom Armstrong, 5. Adam Barber, 6. Adam Swift, 7. Ben Karalius, 8. Ant Walker, 9. Aaron Lloyd, 10. Carl Forster, 11. Scott Hale, 12. Matty Ashurst, 13. Andrew Dixon.Subs: 14. Danny Jones, 15. Kenny Hughes, 16. Jordan Hand, 17. Alex Trumper.Salford City Reds U20s:Tries: Adam Clay, Andy Morris, Richard Lepori, Marc Sneyd, Callum Marriott.Goals: Marc Sneyd 4.St Helens U20s:Tries: Dan Brotherton, Adam Barber, Andrew Dixon.Goals: Adam Barber.Half Time: 10-14Full Time: 14-28last_img read more

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FANCY starting the new season with a few ££££ in y

first_imgFANCY starting the new season with a few ££££ in your bank account?This week the Saints Lottery Rollover Jackpot reaches a huge £1,800 and you have to be in it to win it!Our rollover increases by £200 each time there is no winner and this means someone is in for a nice New Year bonus.As well as this fabulous bank boost each week one lucky member wins £1,000 whilst others can take home anything from £200 to Saints Superstore vouchers – all for just £1 per week.Are you 16 and over? Joining is simple. You can either call our Lottery office on 01744 455056 and give your details over the phone or if you’re local we can arrange a collector to call.If you wish to pay by Standing Order there is a form below and we love this option.You tell us which date you wish to pay, you never miss a draw and the results are posted online each week for you to read at your leisure. And the best part? No claim required. We make sure you receive your prize, whether via your Agent or through the post.If you wish to know more, please call on 01744 455 056 or 455070 and speak to us, and we’d be delighted to give you more information.last_img read more

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