Try of the 09/10 season

first_imgTAGS: Bath Rugby LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Nick AbendanonThe Bath rugby boys make it easy to show why rugby is a sport full of sheer excitement. Another long-range wonder, this time from Bath’s Nick Abendanon. It was the Try of the Season in the Guinness Premiership.last_img

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David Barnes – Bath

first_imgMan of the people David Barnes Once bitten, twice shy? Not where David Barnes is concerned. The Bath prop is back in training to tackle Mount Kilimanjaro, nearly three years after he first conquered Africa’s highest peak. In 2008 Barnes scaled the 5,895m mountain to raise money for the Rugby Players’ Association (RPA) Benevolent Fund, and in particular to assist Tamara Johnson, a Bath Women’s player who had suffered a serious neck injury. This time round Barnes is again aiming to raise money for the Benevolent Fund but he’s also doing it for Help for Heroes, the charity that raises money for British military personnel wounded in the line of duty. It was in September last year that the 34-year-old first visited Headley Court in Surrey where a highly-trained team of dedicated medical staff work in rehabilitating injured soldiers. Sobering, humbling, inspiring, it was all of those things for Barnes.“I actually went to Headley Court as part of my testimonial year,” explains Barnes, who was awarded the honour for a decade of unstinting service to the West Country club. “One of the charities involved in the testimonial was Help for Heroes and I wanted to see for myself some of the work being carried out on their behalf.“The visit just took my breath away. I met guys who’d been very badly injured fighting for their country and yet not one was moaning. They had accepted their injuries and were determined to overcome them. A lot of them were talking about rejoining their regiments. The determination was truly amazing and made me feel very humble.“Humble but also resolved to raise money for Headley Court so that the medical staff can continue their magnificent work. A few meetings and several phone calls later and the Mount Kilimanjaro Challenge 2011 was in motion. It’s impossible to say who exactly will be going on the expedition. Two of my old team-mates from Bath have signed up, Matt Perry and Mark Regan, and a few current players are interested, but they can’t make a definite commitment because the nature of professional rugby means injuries have a habit of getting in the way.”Someone else who’ll be striding up Kili with Barnes is Andy Blyth, the former England A centre who suffered a career-ending spinal injury in March 2000. For a while doctors thought Blyth would never walk again but now he’s champing at the bit to experience the agony of climbing Kilimanjaro – and that’s not even taking into account the inevitable banter gushing non-stop from the mouth of Regan.“It’s one of the toughest challenges I’ve ever undertaken,” is how Barnes describes his first ascent.“I suffered from altitude sickness. It began with a headache, a bit like a hangover, then I began to vomit, my lips turned blue and I ended with fluid on the lungs, what they call a pulmonary edema. Luckily I had a great guide who was able to give me advice and medicine so I could still get to the top of the mountain.” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Do you want to buy the issue of Rugby World in which this article appeared? Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 visit http://mags-uk.com/ipcOr perhaps you’d like a digital version of the magazine delivered direct to your PC, MAC or Ipad? If so click here. Barnes is already training hard for the expedition, somehow managing to fit it in around his commitments not just with Bath but also with the RPA, of which he is chairman. It’s a role that has brought him much satisfaction as the game in Britain has negotiated its way through some not always calm waters. One of Barnes’s pressing concerns in 2011 is head injuries, not surprising seeing as he’s spent the best part of 15 years with his head in the scrum. “The issue of head injuries is still something we need to better understand. Not just in the short term but the long-term effect. More research needs to be done into concussion, for instance, and we should look at other sports, and always ensure the players’ welfare is paramount.”As for Bath, Barnes believes the arrival of new owner Bruce Craig early last year is a harbinger of better years to come. “Bruce has come in and shown real dynamism and a real desire to restore the glory days once more to Bath,” he says. “We’ve got new training facilities, we’ve got one of the best coaches around in Sir Ian McGeechan; in short, the players have got no excuse for not turning things around.”There’s also a unity within the squad that Barnes says resembles what it was when he first arrived at The Rec all those years ago. “Any successful side plays well together on the field but also bonds well off it, and I think that we’ve got that tightness back at Bath with the likes of David Flatman and Luke Watson playing a big part. The banter’s there, the camaraderie’s there, and so is the respect among the players. The club’s in a healthy state this season.”As for Barnes, he says that he’s no intention of calling it quits just yet. He’s enjoying his rugby as much as ever and the emergence of young Bath prop Nathan Catt is helping to keep him on his toes. Altitude sickness might afflict Barnes, but one thing he’ll never have a problem with is attitude sickness.This article appeared in the February 2011 issue of Rugby World Magazine TAGS: Bath Rugby last_img read more

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Start for Weepu as Hansen makes four changes

first_imgWELLINGTON, NEW ZEALAND – SEPTEMBER 06: Piri Weepu passes during a New Zealand All Blacks training session at Rugby League Park on September 6, 2012 in Wellington, New Zealand. (Photo by Hagen Hopkins/Getty Images) Starting XV:15. Israel Dagg, 14. Cory Jane, 13. Conrad Smith, 12. Ma’a Nonu, 11. Julian Savea, 10. Aaron Cruden, 9. Piri Weepu, 1. Tony Woodcock, 2. Andrew Hore, 3. Owen Franks, 4. Luke Romano, 5. Samuel Whitelock, 6. Liam Messam, 7. Richie McCaw (C), 8. Kieran ReadReplacements:16. Keven Mealamu, 17. Charlie Faumuina, 18. Brodie Retallick, 19. Victor Vito, 20. Aaron Smith, 21. Beauden Barrett, 22. Tamati Ellison LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS First choice: Piri Weepu get’s his first start of the tournamnentDUNEDIN WILL play host to the first meeting in The Rugby Championship between the table-topping All Blacks and the traveling Springboks. The home side currently hold a three-from-three performance and top the table with 12 points, and are up against an inconsistent Boks side.The squad features an interchange of several starting XV and bench roles from last week. In the forwards, hooker Andrew Hore gets a start in the number two jersey with Keven Mealamu on the bench; Samuel Whitelock swaps with Brodie Retallick and Liam Messam starts ahead of Victor Vito.In the backs, halfback Piri Weepu gets his first start of the year, with Aaron Smith on the bench; while Tamati Ellison comes onto the bench replacing Ben Smith.All Blacks Head Coach Steve Hansen said: “We are all looking forward to the challenge that the Springboks will bring this weekend. They are an opponent that we have immense respect for, they are our traditional foe and there is great history between our two countries.  It’s going to be a huge Test match. It is also the first All Blacks Test in Dunedin’s indoor stadium, which is exciting for the team.”“At the halfway stage of the new Investec Rugby Championship we are very happy, from a results point of view.  There is a second challenge we have set ourselves – to constantly improve our game – and in that regard we are not the finished product. However, the coaching staff and team leaders are reasonably happy with the progress we are making and Saturday gives us another opportunity to confront both challenges – our opponent and ourselves,” Hansen added. The last Test between the two sides was in Port Elizabeth, South Africa, in August last year, with South Africa winning 18-5. The last match in New Zealand was earlier that year in Wellington with the All Blacks winning 40-7.New Zealand v South AfricaSaturday, 15th September 2012 at Forsyth Barr Stadium, DunedinKick-off: 08:35 BST live on Sky Sports 1last_img read more

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King’s School Macclesfield – School Team of the Month (November 2012)

first_imgBack row (from left): Mr G Mason (head of rugby), L Holt, H Ravenscroft, A Thorneycroft, J Duncan, J Kenny, O Kenny, M Parker, E Horton, T Mort, D Percival, T Fairclough. Front: R Nichols, D Greer, B Marsden, M Stubbs, J Sadler (capt), A McCloskey, D Sheratte, J Hale, J Robinson.KING’S SCHOOL, Macclesfield held off St Paul’s School, Eltham College, Ellesmere College and Rugby to claim this month’s award.After an unbeaten tour of Canada, the Cheshire school – led by No 8 Jack Sadler – reeled off nine consecutive wins against stiff opposition to register as good a start as any in recent memory.There were outstanding wins over QEGS Wakefield, Lymm HS and RGS Lancaster, but the pick was a first win over Sedbergh, watched by close to 1,000 people under the Macclesfield RFC lights. Tries from Jamie Duncan, centre Ben Marsden and hooker Dominic Sheratte clinched a famous win in which there were standout displays by Sadler, Marsden, flanker Johnny Kenny and scrum-half Henry Ravenscroft.Sadler has been a key man up front alongside a strong front row of Dan Percival, Sheratte and Mike Parker. Kenny, who missed out on an England U16 cap through injury two years ago, has been a great ball-carrier, Marsden has made breaks and ground constantly, and Ravenscroft – last year’s full-back – has slotted effortlessly into the No 9 shirt. This article appeared in the January 2013 issue of Rugby World Magazine.Find a newsagent that sells Rugby World in the UK. Or you may prefer the digital edition on your MAC, PC, or iPad. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Matt Stubbs has kicked 88 valuable points – none more so than the 11 against Sedbergh – while the tireless Kenny is top try-scorer with eight to his name.last_img read more

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Hotshots: Edinburgh rugby’s young star, Alex Allan

first_imgWhen did you first play rugby?When I was seven my dad took me to Harrogate rugby club. He didn’t play but he thought I’d enjoy it. Later on I went to Sedbergh College.Can you play on both sides of the scrum?I had more game time through the years at loosehead, but more recently I’ve played more at tighthead. In my early teens I was a centre!How did you end up playing in Scotland? I qualify for Scotland through my dad’s dad, Don Allan. I played for the Exiles and Scotland age-grades and last year I became one of Edinburgh’s EDP (Elite Development Players).I put my degree at Loughborough on hold after two years and joined Edinburgh Accies.Who has helped you at Edinburgh?  Allan Jacobsen stayed behind after training with me all season to give me tips and tactics.You broke your leg just after being selected for the John Macphail Scholarship…I was excited about going to New Zealand for the summer; it would have been a great opportunity. I was devastated when I broke my leg, but injuries are part of rugby and I had been lucky until now.What are your aims for the next year?I came off the bench against Munster in the Heineken Cup, which was unbelievable. Playing for Edinburgh regularly is the next step.RW Verdict: This 21-year-old prop is on the verge of a big breakthrough. Watch for him next season! LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img  This appeared in the July 2013 issue of Rugby World. Click here to see what’s in the current edition.last_img read more

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British & Irish Cup round-up

first_imgIreland’s fullback Darragh Leader (R) avoids a tackle from Fiji’s wing Mosese Qionimacawa during the IRB Junior World Championship match Ireland vs Fiji on June 9, 2013 at teh Rabine Stadium in Vannes, western France. AFP PHOTO / DAMIEN MEYER (Photo credit should read DAMIEN MEYER/AFP/Getty Images) The Greene King IPA Championship: …took a backseat at the weekend thanks to the British and Irish CupBy Richard GraingerBristol bonus point may disappear into black hole.A bizarre incident in the 69th minute of the British & Irish Cup Pool 5 match between Aberavon and Bristol on Saturday at the Talbot Athletic ground led to the match being abandoned.When a six-foot hole appeared in the pitch, the fire brigade were called and ground staff spent 25 minutes attempting to plug the trench with soil and turf, but couldn’t satisfy referee Mr Ross Campbell that the surface was fit to resume play.The hosts, trailing 20-24, were in something of a hole themselves, and will be hoping for a replay, while Bristol, who had by then notched a bonus point, will not. The B&I Cup organising committee will announce later this week whether the result will stand, as there is no provision in the rules for part of a pitch disappearing.Bristol team manager John Harrison told BBC Radio Bristol: “The referee had his attention drawn to what he thought was a divot, which transpired to be a hole which we think was going to some sort of drainage channel.”Finally back to winning ways: Bedford Blues squeaked byBedford Blues 29, Llanelli 24Another club to find themselves in a hole this season is Bedford, who finally recorded their first win of the season against Llanelli at Goldington Road on Saturday.Last years’ Championship finalists, who until Saturday have had nothing to show for the attacking flair and ambition shown by their young players, scored five tries to notch a bonus point win.The Blues, whose main problem has been a defence as loose as Aberavon’s pitch, managed to restrict the visitors to three. They now look forward to a resumption of Greene King IPA Championship action on Saturday where they entertain Ealing, the division’s whipping boys.Ealing Trailfinders 15, Cross Keys 24The only thing that Ealing players entertain is the distant memories of success in National League One. However, the West Londoners, who conceded three first-half tries to find themselves chasing the game 5-19 down at half-time, fronted up in the second half and outscored their Welsh visitors 10-5.Connacht 27, Rotherham 25The Titans were denied an memorable and deserved win when full-back Darragh Leader struck the winning penalty in the final minute to wipe out Titans’ replacement Lloyd Hayes’s 75th minute effort. Finally, Leeds Carnegie thrashed Gala 86-8 at Headingley on Sunday.This weekend sees a return to Greene King IPA Championship action. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Last minute man: Connacht’s Darragh Leader won the gameA crowd of 200 watched the visitors let early dominance that produced two tries and a 3-12 interval lead slip, conceding three second period tries to the Irish outfit. Moseley 22, Leinster A 24Moseley join Ealing as the only two Championship clubs still seeking a win this season having squandered a seven point lead against the illustrious Leinster second string.Mose’s former Irish international head coach Kevin Maggs said: “It’s been a much better performance after last week and it’s just a couple of lapses in concentration that spoilt it for us.”Pontypridd 29, London Welsh 22The Exiles’ can turn their attention to a return to the Aviva Premiership after their second consecutive B&I Cup defeat, despite fielding a strong side. Almost 3,500 turned up at Sardis Road to see their team record a bonus point win over the Londoners to give departing head coach Dale McIntosh a send-off to remember.Nottingham 16, Munster A 17A late try by Rory Scannell dashed last year’s Championship semi-finalists’ hopes of a memorable upset and confined the Green and Whites to their fourth consecutive defeat.Nottingham were good value for their 16-10 interval lead, but backs coach Ben Johnston blamed poor execution of basic skills and silly penalties for the turnaround.Best of the restElsewhere London Scottish were much too strong for Edinburgh Accies and ran out 55-19 winners. Despite a late comeback resulting in two last quarter penalty tries, Jersey went down 24-19 at a wet and windy Ravenhill.Plymouth’s lengthy trip to Stirling County resulted in a 12-38 win, while the Cornish Pirates — their neighbours from across the Tamar — travelled slightly further to inflict a 10-53 defeat on Ayr.last_img read more

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Hotshots: Glasgow fly-half Finn Russell

first_img When did you first play?I started at Stirling County when I was seven or eight and stayed until I was 19.Is rugby a favourite sport in your family?  I have two brothers, one two years older and one three years younger, and we always played together in the garden. Wherever we were we would have a ball with us. My dad Keith coached my junior team.When did you first represent Scotland?In the U20s. I trained with the U18s but didn’t play.You played in New Zealand last summer. How was that?It was brilliant to go there on the John Macphail Scholarship. I had Jason Holland (ex-Munster) as a mentor and I did individual sessions with him. Family affair: Russell grew up playing rugby with his brothers LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS RW verdict: The 21-year-old fly-half has “an excellent base to build on” according to coach Gregor Townsend.This Hotshot was first published in the March edition of Rugby World. Click here to find out what’s in this month’s mag! You have now signed a pro contract at Glasgow…I’ve been there since I was 19 and it’s brilliant. It was great to come back from New Zealand and get my first start. The rest of the time I play for Ayr.What else do you do?I was an apprentice stonemason. I want to do my final year.What are your aims now?I am hoping to get some game time for Glasgow when the Scotland players are away during the Six Nations. It’s so competitive here… I just have to keep chipping away.last_img read more

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Wales 33-30 Japan: Five talking points

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS A review of Wales’ last-gasp victory over Japan in Cardiff Fly over: Akihito Yamada scores under the posts for Japan. Photo: Getty ImagesIt will take time to change the way in which Wales play, given how ingrained it has become, but Welsh supporters also saw Eddie Jones pick up a failing England squad and spin it like a coin. Charles Darwin had millions of years with which to demonstrate evolution, the Welsh team do not – most supporters want to see the back-line develop some hands sooner rather than later.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here. Late show: Leigh Halfpenny congratulates Sam Davies after his winning drop-goal. Photo: Getty Images A negative victoryNot every victory is a positive, nor every loss negative. Ireland’s loss to the All Blacks was loaded with positives, Wales’ victory over Japan was not. Barring a confident match-winning drop-goal from Sam Davies, the ever consistent and hugely impressive Alun Wyn Jones and Liam Williams, plus some solid gain-line carrying from Scott Baldwin, this was another confusing performance from Wales. They beat 30 defenders, made 11 line breaks and completed 23 offloads, yet managed to score just three tries against a Japanese squad well short of the quality which saw them beat the Springboks in 2015.Rock at lock: Alun Wyn Jones makes a break through Japan’s defence. Photo: Getty ImagesWales had 72% of territory and 68% of possession in the first half yet were unable to produce a significant points margin for any length of time. The pattern was repeated in the second half where fluid Japanese passing meant that Wales were never more than a handful of points away from a humiliating defeat, which meant Keelan Giles didn’t even have the opportunity to run onto the grass.With an obvious advantage at the scrum, it was strange that Wales chose to use it so little. A telling stat is that two out of three of the Japanese back row out-carried their Welsh counterparts when back-row moves from the base of a scrum should have been prioritised. Even more baffling is that Ross Moriarty wasn’t used at all, especially given that ball-carrying is one of his major strengths. Not good. Not good at all.Selection question marksWales’ squad selection against Argentina was progressive, a glimmer that Rob Howley had finally hammered a rusty nail into the ‘Warrenball’. Yet the selection for Japan appeared to be a nervous look over the shoulder. Back came the large carriers and predictable straight ‘one-up’ running lines. Barring the effective transition of Leigh Halfpenny to the wing, the Welsh back-line looked like cottage cheese compared to the creamy passing of the Japanese.Over time: Dan Lydiate scores his first Test try. Photo: Getty ImagesSo, too, in the Welsh back row. While it was positive to see Dan Lydiate score a try, his first ever at Test level, the absence of a genuine ball-carrier was bizarre. The selection for South Africa will really show where Wales are in their rebuilding for 2019 because at the moment, compared to Scotland, England and Ireland, Wales haven’t really knocked down the old building, let alone started on the new one.Slow ruck speedIt seems almost inconceivable that anything could be slower than Yu Tamura’s goalkicking and restart routines, but Wales’ ruck speed was. The problem wasn’t even with the speed of the actual ruck, the ball was often in place, only for it to be slowed by the scrum-half looking for carrying pods to form or runners to arrive at their marks.Chain reaction: Alex Cuthbert shows his frustration during the game. Photo: Getty ImagesAt times it genuinely looked as though the players didn’t know what was happening next. Are we going wide? Or are we carrying up the middle? Even against a desperate South African team, Wales will not be able to dwell on the ball for such lengthy periods of time – the Bok counter-ruck is one thing that remains devastating. TAGS: Highlight Hat tip for Sam DaviesIn a game deemed too risky for the electric Keelan Giles, Sam Davies was thrown into a situation in which even senior players were panicking – and shone. His 80th-minute match-winning drop-goal saved many rugby careers being blighted with a draw that would linger long in Welsh rugby.Mr Cool: Sam Davies drops the winning goal in the 80th minute. Photo: Getty ImagesTo drop into the pocket and take responsibility for 80 minutes of rugby, when you yourself have played only 15, is a situation in which even the best outside-halves falter, let alone a 23-year-old picking up his second cap. It wasn’t even a nervy strike that bobbled through the air like a cheap plastic football bought from the corner shop – it was perfect. Congratulations Sam Davies, you saved a nation.When will the excuses stop?‘We’ve had a good training week.’‘We keep making mistakes in the wrong areas.’‘It will take time to change the style of play.’The above may all be valid, but they are not helping to provide a long-term solution to the decline in the performances of the national team and the paying public are beginning to tire of them. Post-match pint conversations are no longer based on the positives of the Grand Slam years and are now veering towards far more negative matters. Wales’ fans see England, Scotland and Ireland progressing and wonder why it isn’t happening at home.last_img read more

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The Great Migration: The Moroccans drawn to France

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS FOR THE LATEST SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS, CLICK HEREJelti offers up a view on why some young men he knows have taken on that trip. “I have some Tunisian friends who came for rugby, some Moroccans. They all try to get opportunities to change their lives with rugby.“It has helped many people. Yes, of course in Morocco, in Tunisia, life is hard and opportunities are very small. If you don’t have money to pay (to be) students, you know how life can be in North Africa. So sometimes people do cross the sea on small boats.” “In my team I have two friends who came from Morocco – Casablanca and another city – in a boat,” says Nabil Jelti, a 36-year-old Moroccan international who first came to France in 1999 on a tourist visa, then a working visa, before eventually becoming a French citizen. “One is now married and working, and the other is playing here (at Parisian side Gennevilliers, in Fédérale 2). We have similar histories. Circumstances change but the goal is the same: they came over to play rugby.”Jelti was bitten by the rugby bug at 16 when Morocco-born Abdelatif Benazzi – who hailed from the same club as Jelti – was captain of France. The legendary forward was held up as the man to emulate for young Moroccan players. Work hard, take the risk to go abroad and try rugby at a higher level, and maybe you could do what Benazzi did.SEE OUR INVESTIGATION IN THE NEW ISSUE“I first went to Rouen,” Jelti says of his own journey. “It was difficult because the life is not the same as living with family in Morocco. Finding yourself alone or with new friends, new city, new language, new mood… it was different. I was young and focused on the rugby.”With his hero: A young Jelti with BenazziSo what was is it like for a North African in French rugby? “France is like everywhere in the world. If you come and take someone’s place and do better than a French guy, sometimes they don’t accept it.“But I think in rugby we can be different. We can have a different language or skin colour but we fight for the same thing: to win. Sometimes in defeat I think we can forget all these things. North Africans don’t always follow a conventional route into French rugby, as Moroccan international Nabil Jelti tells Alan Dymock as part of our Great Migration seriescenter_img Man of action: Nabil Jelti faces New Zealand sevens Credit: Nabil Jelti “I have seen a lot of people come over. My best friend, Abdellatif Boutaty, plays for Stade Français. His career is better than me because he plays in the Top 14. He came when he was 19, grew up in Toulouse (in the centre of excellence), then went to Montauban, Bayonne and now with Stade Français. Last year they won the Challenge Cup.”We know of the motivation that inspires athletes from the Pacific Islands, Eastern Europe and South Africa to seek fortunes abroad. Their stories are heard often, and so many of them are striking. We think we know, too, of the motivation for many migrants from Africa who brave the odyssey to Europe.last_img read more

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Cheetahs player banned for emptying nose on opponent

first_img Guinness Pro14 Fixtures After a disciplinary panel met in Cardiff to deliberate on the Lee incident, following a citing, the panel found: “The Player’s actions are an act of foul play. They have no place in the game. This is not a case of over-exuberance, or an act which is within the rules of the game going awry. It follows that by its nature this act is one that is deserving of punishment. It is contrary to the spirit of sport.”They went on to state: “The effect on the victim player was understandably serious. There is no expectation, and there ought never be an expectation, that an opposing player would clear the contents of their nose onto an opponent.”In summary, the panel said: “It is difficult to imagine how an act of foul play of this sort could be worse, save for repeated acts or where actual injury is caused.” Guinness Pro14 Fixtures 2020-21 The 2020-21 Guinness Pro14… Collapse LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Connacht are away to Glasgow, who are one place and nine points above them in Conference A, tomorrow night. Cheetahs are away to the Scarlets on Sunday. Replacement centre Benhard Janse van Rensburg has flown out to replace Lee in Wales.Don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram for all the latest rugby news. Cheetahs player Nico Lee banned for 13 weeks after he “accepted that he had cleared the contents of his nose onto the face of an opposing player.” pic.twitter.com/bpXRqT0L6l— Murray Kinsella (@Murray_Kinsella) February 20, 2019Since the decision, the Cheetahs have released a statement on it all, saying: “The unsportsmanlike behaviour is seen in a very serious light by (our) rugby hierarchy.  The Toyota Cheetahs condemn this behaviour which it is not part of the team culture and accept the punishment as such.“Nico is a star player and according to information from the team, he deeply regrets his behaviour and apologised immediately after the match to the opponent. Expand Guinness Pro14 Fixtures Cheetahs player banned for emptying nose on opponentTHIS MAY be the most revolting thing we’ve seen on a rugby pitch in a while. During the Guinness Pro14 match-up between Connacht and the Toyota Cheetahs, visiting South African centre Nico Lee emptied the contents of his nose onto the face of a Connacht player at the bottom of the ruck.The top-end entry point for an incident like this is 26 weeks. Lee’s ban was halved due to his admission of the facts and Lee’s clean disciplinary record up until this point. WITH CARDS flying as readily as they will…center_img IT WAS a headline writer’s dream at the… The guilty party: Centre Nico Lee taking contact against Connacht (Getty Images) Rugby Rant: Tip tackle rulings inconsistent Gnashing and crashing: when rugby gets bite-y Gnashing and crashing: when rugby gets bite-y Nico Lee has been banned for 13 weeks for the vile act against Connacht. Expand Rugby Rant: Tip tackle rulings inconsistent “The Toyota Cheetahs realise that he is remorseful of his actions and the team accepts the apology.”Connacht won this match 25-17. Both sides scored three tries, but two Jack Carty penalties and one more conversion than the Cheetahs’s was enough to see the Irish outfit triumph. The win put Connacht six points clear of the Cheetahs in Pro 14 Conference A, as they leapt into third in the division.last_img read more

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