The Battle Against Ebola in Liberia: Young People Played a Game-changing Role

first_imgArchie Gbessay, 28, stands at an intersection in Monrovia’s West Point neighborhood next to a stall where mobile-phone recharge scratch cards are sold. Across the street is a school that, in August 2014, became the focus of Liberia’s Ebola crisis. It was being used as a holding centre for Ebola victims when enraged residents broke through its iron gate and released patients.Now empty, it is being renovated to be used again as a school. The military quarantine imposed on West Point after the residents’ raid seems far away, as does the atmosphere of fear that enveloped Liberia. The country has made remarkable progress in the fight against Ebola. It is nearly a month since the last new case – thought to be a result of sexual intercourse with a survivor rather than transmission from an active case – and there are no Ebola patients in Liberia’s treatment units.For many experts the efforts of community volunteers like Gbessay have played a critical role in halting Ebola’s spread. As deaths mounted in August and September, residents in some of Liberia’s hardest-hit neighborhoods organized groups that searched for Ebola cases, battling denial of the virus and sharing information with Liberian health officials.Although many Liberians initially refused to acknowledge the existence of Ebola, these groups convinced their neighbours to adopt preventive measures and seek treatment if ill.Gbessay and a few friends established their informal group in August when the epidemic began to overwhelm the Liberian government’s response. “We felt that if we did nothing, we would be judged for our actions,” he says.Initially, they sought to combat Ebola denial through face-to-face discussions. Then the holding centre was attacked and West Point was cordoned off, provoking a violent confrontation between residents and soldiers, who shot and killed a 15-year-old boy. The government turned to Mosoka Fallah, a Harvard-trained infectious diseases specialist who had spent part of his early life in West Point, to mediate.Tasked by the Liberian ministry of health with tracking down Ebola cases, Fallah recognized that engagement with communities was key to stopping the outbreak. Many people were angry at the long delays in removing infected bodies from neighboring homes, or refused to believe Ebola was real. It was often difficult to obtain information about people who were sick or had been in contact with Ebola victims.Fallah heard reports of secret burials in West Point and feared there were unreported cases inside the neighborhood’s maze of tin-roofed shacks and alleys. He became aware of Gbessay’s group and realised its potential as a bridge into the community. Fallah offered to help train the volunteers, but says: “At the time there was no pay. It was just about saving your community.”Under Fallah’s guidance, the group grew to more than 100 volunteers. He provided them with notepads and pens, asking them to record the names and condition of anyone exhibiting Ebola symptoms. “The first day they found a lot of cases,” Fallah says, adding that the group showed Liberia’s leaders that West Point’s residents were cooperating with the fight against Ebola. “It was so successful it convinced the president to de-quarantine West Point,” Fallah says.By early September, the situation in Monrovia had become dire, with sick people lying in front of overcrowded treatment facilities. Health officials continued to have trouble getting communities to cooperate with government efforts. Dr Bernice Dahn, Liberia’s assistant minister of health, (she is now the current minister designate) asked Fallah to expand the West Point model to other neighborhoods.Fallah organized community meetings across Monrovia. “We apologized to them first,” he says. “We told them that we’ve been doing a top-down approach and it’s wrong. We want to let you be the decision-makers and we’ll be the supporters.” Volunteers were dubbed active-case finders, and were soon knocking on doors and keeping an eye on those who’d had contact with the sick.In late September, the World Health Organization (WHO) opened a 120-bed Ebola treatment unit (ETU), creating space for those found by Fallah’s volunteers. By the beginning of October, he says, “Everywhere we went we were seeing progress. There were challenges but those kids were working their butts off.”In New Kru Town, the site of a community hospital where the deaths of nine clinicians had marked the worsening of Liberia’s Ebola crisis in June, Eric Patten, 30, had taken over as the lead active-case finder. “We were working 24 hours a day,” he says. Sometimes his teams would spend hours at a single house convincing a suspected case to report to a treatment centre. “Many of them would have just stayed home and died or gone to the drug store for antibiotics,” Patten says.By mid-October, WHO data showed case rates falling rapidly across Monrovia. Officials from the US Center for Disease Control (CDC) reacted with disbelief, sending teams to check funeral homes and graveyards to see if deaths were being hidden.When a cluster of cases was recorded in New Kru Town in late October, Fallah was dispatched to investigate. He found Patten waiting for him with the names and locations of the dead along with a list of all their contacts. “He was so meticulous and detailed – it gave me a lot of hope,” Fallah says.At the same time there was a drastic reduction in the forested north-western district of Foya where Ebola first appeared in Liberia. Piet deVries, country director of Global Communities, says it was largely a result of independent measures taken by villages. In one example, known as “community fencing”, all new arrivals to the district’s towns were quarantined for three weeks. Many communities refused to allow visitors.“Ultimately, the only way you stop the infection is when people practice safe behavior,” says DeVries. “If you have continued transmission, it doesn’t matter how many ETUs you have, people will still get sick.”Millions of dollars have been spent on building ETUs since September but the majority of their beds have never been filled by an Ebola patient. By early January 2015, cases in Liberia had dropped to less than 10 a week, reaching zero at the end of February. Frank Mahoney, a CDC epidemiologist, says: “The engine of the outbreak was Monrovia. Getting that on a downward slope contributed to the slowdown.”For Fallah, the slowdown has much to do with the efforts of volunteers like Gbessay. A study Fallah co-authored with researchers from Yale University found that better community engagement was the key factor.He hopes the model of community participation in health outreach developed during the Ebola outbreak will continue after it is over. “People in West Point think it is normal for five or six people to die every day of diseases other than Ebola,” he says. “Why should we accept people dying in the prime of life? We have a model now that shows the power of the community to transform those health issues.”Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Raiders report: Five things we learned Thursday

first_imgYOU GOT WHAT IT TAKES?Make your Raiders-Dolphins pick & challenge our pros***ALAMEDA — Five things we learned Thursday as the Raiders got in their heaviest day of practice in preparation to visit the Miami Dolphins:1) If the Raiders can’t sack up, how much does it matter?Putting pressure on the quarterback is topic 1-A around the Raiders, and defensive coordinator Paul Guenther floated the idea that sacks aren’t the be-all or end-all when it comes to assessing a unit’s worth. “O …last_img read more

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Welcome to the Religion Department; I Am Your Evil Atheist Professor

first_imgThe religion professor who organized a class at U of Kansas called “Special Topics in Religion: Intelligent Design, Creationism and other Religious Mythologies” (see 11/21/2005) was caught red-handed expressing his real intentions.  According to Knight-Ridder stories in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer and Macon.com, an email from Paul Mirecki became public in which he had said, “The fundies (fundamentalists) want it all taught in a science class, but this will be a nice slap in their big fat face by teaching it as a religious studies class under the category ‘mythology.’”  His letter to the Society of Open-Minded Atheists and Agnostics, a student organization for which he serves as faculty adviser, and which he referred to as “my fellow damned,” was signed off with, “Doing my part to (tick) off the religious right, Evil Dr. P.”  Mirecki is Chairman of the Religious Studies department.    The Chancellor had a word with him, after which Mirecki apologized for his “ill-advised email I sent to a small group of students and friends.”  He promised he would teach the class “as a serious academic subject and in an manner that respects all points of view.”  The class has also been renamed to simply “Intelligent Design and Creationism.”    Legislators got word of this email and were not pleased.  There was discussion of withholding funds from the school.  Quoting the article, Rep. Brenda Landwehr, vice chairwoman of the House Appropriations Committee, called the e-mail “venomous,” adding, “He’s not sorry he wrote it.  He’s sorry it became public.”Update 11/30/2005: Mirecki has canceled the class.  KansasCity.com and The Guardian (UK) reported that the furor caused by his email was too much.  Chancellor Hemenway called the attitudes expressed “repugnant and vile,” and said it “misrepresents everything the university is to stand for.”  A state senator called the words “hateful” and felt the University did the right thing by listening to the public’s outrage and canceling the class.  Bob Crowther on Evolution News doubts Mirecki’s sincerity; he has found a track record of similar antireligious statements by Mirecki.There you have it, folks.  Parents, when you sent your precious sons and daughters to college, with visions of enlightenment, scholarly advancement and the contemplative life, is this what you had in mind?  Were you aware the devil was head of the religion department?  Do you accept his apology for half a second?  Do you believe for a moment this wrist-slap is going to stop his face-slapping intentions?  Better wake up; this is not an isolated case.   This was the university that took up arms against the Kansas school board in their attempt to de-dogmatize Darwin and permit (not mandate) critical discussion of his views, but attitudes like Mirecki’s are rife in today’s radical-leftist academic institutions.    Now you know why a fair and honest discussion of intelligent design is hard to come by in most universities.  One can only hope enough people are repulsed by this venomous behavior enough to drive the vermin out, open the windows, clean out the garbage, and let in some fresh air and sunshine, to recreate that once-sacred environment for the free exchange of ideas among scholars motivated by a love of the truth.(Visited 12 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Blogger Arrests in Egypt: This Week in Online Tyranny

first_imgTop Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Before covering the events that have taken place this week in Egypt, I think it’s important to examine those stories that are in danger of being lost to the public’s consciousness because of the dramatic nature of what’s happening in Tahrir Square. Also, in one case, it’s instructive to talk about one case which came about as a direct result of Egypt. In fact, let’s start there, with Syria. Syria lifts Internet bans. Syria is an enthusiastic banner of social media tools. Facebook and YouTube have been banned in that authoritarian country for four years. But now, that ban has been lifted. This is a result of the Tunisian and Egyptian uprisings. Like those countries, Syria has labored under a prolonged tinhorn tyranny; in this case, it has endured two generations of Assad-family rule. Perhaps it’s hoped this relaxation will act as a pressure release. Perhaps it is also hoped that trouble-makers in the Syrian regime will be more easily identified if they are lured out in the virtual open. “It seems like a policy to curry favor with the youth,” Syrian dissident Ammar Abdulhamid told us. The relaxation was accompanied by the announcement of a food subsidy for the needy. Thailand prosecutes another blogger under lèse majesté. The trail for the prosecution of Chiranuch Premchaiporn, the webmaster of the Prachatai website, is ongoing. The charge of lèse majesté is a popular one in Thailand when the government finds anyone it wishes to muzzle. The charge is one of bad mouthing the king and queen, who are very popular in Thailand. It is the Thai equivalent of “insulting the leader” or “insulting religion.” Burma sentences imprisoned blogger to more time. Kaung Myat Hlaing, known by the blogging name of Nat Soe, has been sentenced to an additional ten year sentence on top of the two years he’s already serving. In a secret “trial,” Hlaing was convicted of being part of a poster campaign in support of dissident Aung San Suu Kyi and others. He was deprived of food and water for ten days until he “confessed” to being part of the postering group. China bans “Egypt” as search term. Most of the countries terrified by the people who are rising up in Tunisia and Egypt are Arab ones, like Saudi Arabia. But China is nothing if not forward thinking and accounts of people forcing their governments to account are definitely outre in the Middle Kingdom. So “Egypt” has joined “Tiananmen” and “falun gong” as banned terms on the Chinese Internet. Malaysia announces Internet censorship regime. The Malaysian government is drawing up “guidelines” (read: laws) for online behavior (read: speech). The fact that these rules are in conjunction with the country’s Sedition Act tells you everything you need to know about the motivation behind them. Blogging is popular in Malaysia and several of its more prominent bloggers eventually even ran for office; one of them, Jeff Ooi, becoming a member of the Malaysian parliament, which makes the limitations all the more unfortunate. American university a hot-bed of censorship. No country lives up to its ideals, but when the place where those ideals are most openly trodden on is the country’s university system, you know something’s wrong. The U.S. is big on free speech, enshrining it in the country’s highest law, the Constitution. But over the past decade or more, more and more university systems have outlawed speech that is “offensive.” Offensive speech is the only speech that requires constitutional and legal guarantee of course. The right to say “good morning” or “nice shoes” or “I like sunshine” is not one likely to be abrogated. The University of Massachusetts Amherst has made – I swear I am not making this up – on-campus rallies on “controversial” subjects (vague, much?) subject to a set of regulations that make them difficult if not impossible to stage. That’s right. At this point, it is easier for Egyptians to protest for the end of the Mubarak regime than UM students to protest against the continuation of U.S. presence in Iraq. I would call the administration of the University of Massachusetts a bunch of douchebags but it probably breaks the school’s speech code. This week in Egypt characterized by blogger abductionsSandmonkey abducted, beaten, freed. Well-known Egyptian blogger Sandmonkey was “arrested,” beaten up, then let go. His blog was also hit, “due to problems related to traffic and attacks (many from IPs in Saudi Arabia),” and has been taken offline “temporarily suspended until the problems can be resolved.” That was on the third; a post appeared again on the sixth. Kareem Amer. Kareem was a cause celebre internationally. He served four years in Egyptian prison for criticizing Islam as well as his country’s leadership. Although many Mideast youth defended his right to speak his mind and conscious, he was reviled in the Egyptian press and elsewhere. He was beaten and otherwise ill-treated by his jailers, repeatedly during his time in jail. He went missing around 11:00 p.m. local time on February 6 after leaving Tahrir Square with a friend. Wael Ghonim. The Google middle eastern marketing executive was held blindfolded by Egyptian security forces for 12 days. When he was released, he admitted to being one of the founders of the We are all Khaled Said group, whose Facebook page organized a lot of the protests. His subsequent TV interviews and speeches have rejuvenating a protest movement that showed signs of flagging before Ghonim was released. What do you like about This Week in Online Tyranny? What would you like to see more of? Less of? How can we make it more interesting and more useful to you? Please let us know in the comments.Tahrir photo via Al Jazeera | Assad photo via Wikimedia Commons | Burmese protest photo by Alan Chan | UMass photo via Wikimedia Commons | Kareem photo via Cyberdissidents.org A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Tags:#TWiOT#web center_img curt hopkins Related Posts 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

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A Travel Guide to Taking a Drone on a Plane

first_imgPlanning to take your drone on an airplane? Here is the travel guide you need to get you through security and on your way in no time.Top image via ShutterstockTraveling with a drone isn’t as hard as you might think — but you do need to be properly prepared. Here are a few tips that cover everything from case suggestions to flight restrictions. Use this advice and you’ll have no problem getting through security in an orderly fashion.Carry-On Bags vs. Hard Shell CasesImages via ShutterstockDepending on the size and amount of gear you have for your drone, you’ll need to decide if you want to carry on the drone or check it in a hard shell case. Just like traveling with camera gear, it’s always best to keep things with you. A checked bag is always a risk. Even if it’s handled properly, there’s always a chance that the bag can get delayed or put on the wrong plane.If you have a smaller drone like like a Phantom, there are bags designed for carry-on purposes. You just need to make sure that the bag fits in the overhead compartments or underneath your seat — this differs on every plane.DJI actually has a hard shell backpack, but I’d actually advise against getting a bag with any type of branding. You want your bag to be as inconspicuous as possible. While airport security doesn’t care if your bag says DJI, thieves might. The hard shell backpacks are always uncomfortable and wear you down if you have to carry over long distances. I much prefer a soft bag for carrying long distance. Again, there is an official soft backpack for drones — but you can find all sorts of these bags online.If you have a larger drone like a DJI Inspire 1, Yuneec Typhoon, or Freefly Alta, you’ll definitely want a rolling hard shell case to check the drone. The Inspire and Typhoon are borderline in size. They will fit in overhead compartments on larger planes, but they won’t come close in smaller planes. Rather than risk finding out at boarding time, just plan to check your drone. A hard shell case is your best form of protection when it comes to traveling with a drone. I once checked a semi-rugged case with padding, and still found that my baggage wasn’t handled properly.The best way to travel is actually a combination of both. I always check the drone body, controller, and accessories. In my bag, I carry the drone batteries, as well as the camera gimbal and memory cards. Those are things I want to make sure don’t get tossed around below the plane.Lithium-Ion BatteriesRechargeable lithium ion batteries must always be carried in carry-on baggage. This includes your drone batteries. Do not check your batteries with the drone. It’s also recommended that you protect the battery terminals; you can simply cover them with tape.You’ll need to verify with the airline, but the standard regulations limit passengers to only two lithium ion batteries over 100 watt hours (Wh). There is no limit for most batteries under 100 watt hours.This is why you’ll see manufacturers like DJI producing two types of batteries. For the Inspire 1 series, DJI produces the TB-47 battery that has 99.90 Wh, and the TB-48 which has 129.96 Wh. The FAA restricts passengers to two TB-48 batteries, but they can carry several TB-47 batteries. You can also combine the type and carry two TB-48 batteries at four TB-47 batteries.New batteries should have the watt hour marked on them. If for some reason they don’t, you can calculate the watt hours by multiplying the battery voltage by the Amp hours (Ah).For a more detailed look, check out this video from Tom’s Tech Time. Tips for the Security LineWhen you’re going through security with your drone in tow, it will always benefit you to place batteries in their own bin, just like you do with your laptop. There is a very good chance that airport security will pull your batteries aside to do an inspection. The more open you are about putting them in their own bin, the faster you can get to your flight.In my experience, the only question I am usually asked is, “What are these batteries for?” I’ve never had to defend the Watt hours or anything of that nature. That said, I still know everything in my bag.Take a Repair Kit and Extra PropellorsImage via ShutterstockThere’s really nothing worse than traveling across the world only to realize you don’t have enough propellors. In case a prop is damaged during travel, or even worse, in a drone crash, you’ll want to make sure you have extra propellors to get you back in the air. For extra protection, keep the propellors in their original packaging if they’re new.In addition to having extra propellors, if you do manage to crash your drone, you’ll want to have the repair tools handy. That way if you need to make any adjustments or open up the drone to remove some sand, dust, or debris — you’ll be good to go.Have any additional tips for travelers? Let us know in the comments below.last_img read more

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Sunni Waqf Board denies diluting its stand in Ayodhya case

first_imgThe Uttar Pradesh Sunni Central Waqf Board on Thursday denied reports that it was diluting its stand in the Babri Masjid-Ram Janmabhoomi case. It said it “”unequivocally affirms its full faith in the ability and competence” of senior counsel Rajeev Dhawan, who is arguing for the Muslim side.Mr. Dhawan is “doing a commendable job in putting forth the case of Babri Masjid,” Board chairman Zufar Ahmed Faruqi said. The Board “shall ever remain indebted to him [Mr. Dhawan].” The Board also welcomed the permission granted for mediation by the Supreme Court, arguing that a “mutually amicable settlement will be beneficial for both the communities in maintaining harmony and cordial relations.”The Board’s clarification was issued a day after a faction of the Jamiat Ulama-e-Hind accused Mr. Faruqi of engaging in activities that raised “suspicion” in the case and warned him against entering into any “secret deals” that went against the Constitution or harmed the Muslim community.last_img read more

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23 days agoTeam of the Week: Leicester dominate; Jorginho fills Chelsea void; Ederson excellent

first_imgTeam of the Week: Leicester dominate; Jorginho fills Chelsea void; Ederson excellentby Eli Rubenstein Sturgess23 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveIt was another weekend of drama in the Premier League, with Dean Henderson’s rare blunder gifting Liverpool a 16th consecutive win.Manchester City once again took all 3 points, Leicester destroyed Newcastle to concretise themselves in the top 3 and Manchester United and Arsenal battled it out for a tough draw.We here at tribalfootball look at the top performers from Matchday 7 in the Tribal Football Team Of The Week.GOALKEEPER – EDERSON(Manchester City)The City goalkeeper was back to his best against Everton, proving why he belongs in the star-studded Guardiola line-up.In total the Brazilian made 6 saves, 2 of them terrific reflex stops to deny the imposing Yerry Mina from corners.CENTRE-BACK – VIRGIL VAN DIJK (Liverpool)The world’s best centre-back was again crucial for his side, keeping another clean sheet in the club’s 16th consecutive win.Keeping the ominous home side to just 2 shots on target, Van Dijk was huge in defence winning 11 aerial duels and 8 clearances.The Dutchman was also key to the sides offensive play making 12 (out of 16) accurate long balls.LEFT-BACK – JAN VERTONGHEN (Tottenham Hotspur)With a depleted 10-men-Spurs backed into a corner against an oncoming Southampton side, the Dutchman was instrumental in helping his side cling onto a 2-1 victory.Vertonghen won 4 aerial duels, made 3 interceptions and made 5 clearances in a strong performance.RIGHT-BACK – RICARDO PEREIRA (Leicester City)Twice in two weeks the Portuguese full-back finds himself in the team of the week, proving why he was made Leicester’s player of the season last time out.Bubbly as always bursting down the right flank, Ricardo was a constant threat to the Newcastle defence and was in everything for Leicester completing over 100 passes.However it was his 40 yard blistering run and left-foot long-shot goal that put the Foxes 1-0 up that stole the headlines.DEFENSIVE-MIDFIELD – WILFRED NDIDI (Leicester City)The Nigerian was at his supreme defensive best, making tackles and breaking down Newcastle offensive plays for fun.In total Ndidi made 9 tackles and 5 interceptions, furthering his reputation as the leagues top tackler, as well as scoring Leicester 5th goal with a lovely bit of control in 2nd half injury time.CENTRE-MIDFIELD – LUKA MILOVOJEVIC (Crystal Palace)Crystal Palace’s cool, calm and collected captain was key in the Eagles 2-0 win over Norwich.The Serbian midfielder was defensively solid making 6 tackles, and made his impact on the scoresheet, typically converting from the penalty spot.CENTRE-MIDFIELD – JORGINHO (Chelsea)With the repeat absence of N’Golo Kante, the Italian playmaker took control in the centre of Chelsea’s midfield, pulling the strings in the blues 2-0 win over Brighton.Completing 69 passes at an accuracy of 89.9%, Jorginho made 3 key passes and netted the first goal of the game, dispatching one of his trademark penalties.With his defensive duties on display as well, he made 2 tackles, 4 interceptions and 2 clearances in an all-round top performance.LEFT-MIDFIELD – JOHN MCGINN (Aston Villa)The sprightly Scotsman has been consistently one of the top performers for the Villians in the return to the top flight of English Football. In Villa’s tough 2-2 draw with Burnley, it was again McGinn who provided much needed attacking influence to his side.McGinn registered 4 dribbles and 4 shots on goal in total, and thought he had opened the scoring before his first goal was chalked off by VAR.McGinn however would not leave the match without his name on the scoresheet, smashing home a volley in the 79th minute. It was his third goal for the season.RIGHT-MIDFIELD – MATT DOHERTY (Wolverhampton Wanderers)In a much needed win for Wolves over struggling Watford, it was the unlikely source of stalwart Matt Doherty that produced a best on ground performance.The Irishman scored the first goal of the game, tapping home Neto’s delightful cross. He was also very involved in the second, charging down the wing and crossing the ball onto the head of Gibbs-White, whose shot deflected off Janmaat to make it 2-0.RIGHT-FORWARD- RIYAD MAHREZIt was another scintillating performance from the Algerian showboater, whose talent on the ball once again shone through in City’s 1-3 win over Everton.Mahrez appeared to be involved in all of City’s attacking play, fooling defenders for fun. In total, he had 5 shots on target (from 5 shots) and made 5 key passes all while operating at a pass accuracy of 91.4%Mahrez played the pass to De Bruyne in the first goal, scored a beautiful free kick for City’s 2nd, and it was his trickery that led to the 3rd.LEFT-FORWARD – JOSHUA KINGThe Norwegian is putting together another impressive start for the Cherries, with a man of the match performance in Bournemouth’s exciting 2-2 encounter with West Ham.King scored the first goal of the match, cleverly dispatching the loose end on Rico’s cross, making it 50 goals in English Leagues for the attacker.At the start of the 2nd half, King cleverly used the outside of his foot to play through Wilson who made the score 2-1.MANAGER OF THE WEEK – BRENDAN ROGERS (Leicester City)Brendan Roger’s Leicester side has been highly praised, with many pundits predicting their imminent rise into the top 6 after gutsy performances against some of the League’s top sides.However, their rise to the top has been halted by their inability to consistently beat the Premier League’s lesser teams, unlike that of the top sides.This assumption was thoroughly dismantled as Leicester ruthlessly tore apart the struggling Newcastle side.After a positive start with the scores at 1-0, the foxes stepped it up a level when the Magpies went down to 10 men, putting a further four goals past Dubravka in goals.It’s a performance like this that will get the top 6 teams shaking in their boots.GOAL OF THE WEEK – RICARDO PEREIRA (Leicester City)Is there a better right-back in the Premier League than Ricardo Pereira right now? pic.twitter.com/uDEZLVM3CR— Goal (@goal) September 30, 2019 TagsOpinionTeam of the WeekAbout the authorEli Rubenstein SturgessShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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Video: Nick Saban, Miss Terry Arrive At Alabama’s Parade In Style

first_imgNick Saban smiling during a press conference.MIAMI GARDENS, FL – JANUARY 05: Head coach Nick Saban of the Alabama Crimson Tide speaks to the media during Media Day ahead of the Discover BCS National Championship at Sun Life Stadium on January 5, 2013 in Miami Gardens, Florida. (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)Despite the cold weather, Alabama’s national championship celebration and parade are going on as scheduled this Saturday. In fact, the man of the hour just arrived.According to a number of reporters and fans on-scene, Saban and his wife, Miss Terry, arrived at Bryant-Denny Stadium in a black Mercedes SL 550 convertible, motorcade-style. Mr. and Mrs. Nick Saban in #Tuscaloosa #RollTide https://t.co/rmP3Qq0RB2 pic.twitter.com/WJmfd3uCl1— ABC 33/40 News (@abc3340) January 23, 2016An elated Nick Saban at the CFB championship parade today. pic.twitter.com/IVylap5HI8— Ascot Friday (@Ascot_Friday) January 23, 2016Nick Saban and Miss Terry are here pic.twitter.com/V01uPFm5Jo— Marq Burnett (@Marq_Burnett) January 23, 2016Nick Saban concludes the parade. https://t.co/LD6RnCn0bS— Charlie Potter (@Charlie_Potter) January 23, 2016No, Saban doesn’t look thrilled – he’s probably upset that he isn’t out recruiting for next year. But you know he’s smiling on the inside.last_img read more

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Hospitals Upgraded at a Cost of $375 Million

first_imgInfrastructural improvements were carried out on several hospitals across the country during the year, at a cost of more than $375 million, Health Minister, Hon. Dr. Fenton Ferguson, has informed.These include St. Ann’s Bay Regional Hospital, in St. Ann; Annotto Bay Hospital, St. Mary; Princess Margaret Hospital, St. Thomas; Black River Hospital, St. Elizabeth; Mandeville Regional Hospital, Manchester; Bustamante Hospital for Children and Bellevue Hospital, Kingston; Cornwall Regional Hospital, St. James, and Savanna-la-mar Hospital, Westmoreland.Making the disclosure during his contribution to the 2013/14 Sectoral Debate in the House of Representatives, on Tuesday, June 25, Dr. Ferguson said these upgrades formed part of the Ministry’s Operational Plan for 2013-2014.He noted that the Ministry has made progress in achieving the indicated health goals of the plan, including improving health services to Jamaicans and upgrading the physical infrastructure of the public health sector.In the meantime, Dr. Ferguson expressed his gratitude to the National Health Fund, the Government of Japan, China Harbour Engineering Company, the RJR Group and others who supported the reconstruction of the Annotto Bay Hospital after hurricane Sandy.“We are moving Annotto Bay Hospital along the path to becoming a Type B facility,” the Minister said.He also thanked Digicel, Sagicor and Chain of Hope for their partnership in making the construction of the Cardiac Wing at the Bustamante Hospital for Children possible. Ground was broken in February for construction to begin on the $140 million facility.“This will make the hospital the only one in the English speaking Caribbean with a specialist cardiac facility for children,” the Minister said.Turning to the Primary Health Care Infrastructure Improvement Project, Dr. Ferguson informed that work was completed on 20 health centres at a cost of $54.8 million this year.“We have so far renovated over 100 health centres under this programme. I want to thank the member for South East Clarendon, Rudyard Spencer (former Health Minister), for starting this process and assure him that I have made it better and will continue to make it better,” he said.Contact: Alecia Smith-Edwardslast_img read more

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