SLCC Men’s Basketball Signs Duo To 2018-19 Class

first_img Tags: Chris Giles/Dimitri Pandev/FIBA/Findlay Prep/Macedonia/Oklahoma Sooners/Plano Texas July 23, 2018 /Sports News – Local SLCC Men’s Basketball Signs Duo To 2018-19 Class FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailTAYLORSVILLE, Utah-Monday, the SLCC men’s basketball program signed guard Chris Giles and forward Dimitri Pandev, adding a pair of solid pieces to the roster.Giles is a 6’3″ 194-pound guard out of Plano, Texas. who previously played for the Oklahoma Sooners, averaging 1.9 minutes per game for head coach Lon Kruger’s squad.He graduated from Findlay Prep of Henderson, Nev. in 2017 and was a there-star ESPN recruit.Pandev is a 6’10″Macedonian national and has competed in a variety of FIBA Europe competitions, primarily competing on youth squads. Written by Brad Jameslast_img read more

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Spartans baseball players honored at team banquet

first_imgThe Red Bluff Spartans varsity baseball team wrapped up the season with its team banquet Friday. The team went 9-6 with a second place finish in the EAL-SRL. The season ended with a loss in a third consecutive trip to the DII Northern Section championship game. The Spartans had four all league selections and one honorable mention for the season. The league’s coaches vote for the all league and honorable mention players and a coach may not vote for his own player. Tanner Tweedt, Payton …last_img read more

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VICTORIA TOUCH KEEP UP TO DATE

first_imgVictoria Touch have released their November edition of ‘Touchlines’, their monthly newsletter. It has great stories on the judiciary outcome regarding streakers from the Australia Cup, their results from the School Sport Championships, information and profiles for referees and much more information! TOUCHLINES NOVEMBER 2004last_img

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Video: Watch ESPN’s E:60 Special On Ohio State Running Back Ezekiel Elliott

first_imgEzekiel Elliott and Urban Meyer pose for a picture.ESPNBetween J.T. Barrett and Cardale Jones, we still don’t know who will start at quarterback for Ohio State. There is no doubt, however, who will be getting the rock from the backfield. Running back Ezekiel Elliott might have been Ohio State’s best offensive player during the amazing run of post-season wins against Wisconsin, Alabama, and Oregon, totaling 696 yards (9.16 yards per touch) and scoring eight touchdowns in those three games.Before becoming an Ohio State star, Elliott dominated as a three-sport star at John Burroughs High School in St. Louis. Elliott was the subject of ESPN’s latest E:60 special, which aired earlier this evening. It has been posted online by executive producer Andy Tennant. Ohio State fans who missed this are going to want to set aside the next 20 minutes for this fantastic feature. [ESPN]last_img read more

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SC says vehicles cause more pollution than firecrackers

first_imgNew Delhi: The Supreme Court on Tuesday said why people were “running after” firecracker industries when it seems that automobiles were “bigger” contributor to pollution, and asked the Centre whether there was any comparative study on pollution caused by both.While expressing serious concern over loss of jobs of people involved in manufacture and sale of firecrackers, a bench of Justices S A Bobde and S A Nazeer said, “We do not wish to generate unemployment.” Also Read – How a psychopath killer hid behind the mask of a devout laity!”Is there any comparative study on what proportion of pollution is caused by firecrackers and what proportion is caused by automobiles? It seems you are running after firecrackers, but bigger pollution contributor is perhaps vehicles,” the bench told Additional Solicitor General A N S Nadkarni, who was appearing for the Centre. The top court said, “You must tell us some way of preventing unemployment also. We cannot have people unemployed and hungry. There are areas where firecrackers can be used.” Also Read – Encounter under way in Pulwama, militant killed”We cannot give them (those who have lost jobs) money. We cannot support their families. Unemployment is there,” the bench said. The bench also raised a question as to how manufacture of firecrackers could be stopped if the trade is legal and people have licence to carry out the business. “Nobody has tested this in relation to Article 19 (which says all citizens shall have the right to practise any profession, or to carry on any occupation, trade or business). If the trade is legal and you have the licence for this, then how can you stop this? How can you leave people unemployed?” the bench observed. The court was hearing a plea which has sought a complete ban on use of firecrackers across the country on the ground that it gives rise to pollution. The apex court had last year said people in the country can burst firecrackers only from 8 pm to 10 pm on Diwali and other festivals, and had allowed the manufacture and sale of only “green crackers” which have low emission of light, sound and harmful chemicals. During the hearing on Tuesday, the ASG told the bench that the Petroleum and Explosives Safety Organisation (PESO) and other expert agencies were experimenting and they have come up with composition of “green crackers”. Regarding the use of barium nitrate, which was earlier banned by the apex court, Nadkarni said, “Barium was banned in firecrackers by the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change and the Supreme Court also banned it. It was used only for testing purpose to check pollution from crackers.” He referred to the minutes of meeting of the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) and the National Environmental Engineering Research Institute (NEERI) and said it has been envisaged that product approval for the improved formulation shall be given by PESO by March 21 this year. “A meeting in this regard is scheduled tomorrow. Once the formulation comes and if there is any objection, then it will be dealt with,” he said.last_img read more

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From doctors across borders

first_imgOnce again, India and Pakistan stood at the brink of war over Kashmir, and have only just begun to tone down the posturing and threats. With nuclear weapons uncomfortably close at hand, almost 2 billion people in the region face the risk of nuclear catastrophe. For well over three decades now, multiple simulations and projections have suggested that an India–Pakistan nuclear escalation could lead to millions of deaths in the region, rivaling past great famines. The consequences of a nuclear exchange of any magnitude could affect generations to come. Kashmir has proved to be an especially intractable political predicament for the two countries. As Arundhati Roy wrote in her 2017 novel, The Ministry of Utmost Happiness, the confrontation over Kashmir is “a perfect war—a war that can never be won or lost, a war without end”. Also Read – A special kind of bondThe threat of war is a matter of urgent public health concern. Health workers have a duty to speak out and plead for peace. Why would these two populous and proud nations risk disaster by such brinksmanship? The region is one of the poorest in the world with human development ranking for India and Pakistan standing at 130 and 150, respectively, in 2018. An estimated 40 per cent (59 million) of the world’s stunted children and 53 per cent (27 million) of all wasted children live in south Asia, and 34 per cent of the population has no access to sanitation. Investments in health and education remain less than 4 per cent and 3 per cent of respective gross domestic product (GDP) in the region. Yet successive governments and military establishments have escalated military spending—in 2017, it was US$64 billion in India and $11 billion in Pakistan. Also Read – Insider threat managementPerhaps the greatest disappointment is the jingoism and warmongering that have gripped both countries, with some reckless parts of the media baying for blood. We have witnessed almost hysterical calls for retribution after the deplorable suicide bombing in Pulwama, Kashmir, on Feb 14, 2019, that killed 40 Indian soldiers. Perhaps the current escalation of air and ground skirmishes along the military Line of Control (the de facto India–Pakistan border) was inevitable. But civil society representatives and activists have been silenced. Contrarian views, including calls for peace, have been ridiculed and shouted down. With the release by Pakistan of the downed Indian air force pilot on March 1, 2019, temperatures have begun to cool somewhat, yet the situation remains extremely tense. We call upon the governments, political parties, mass media, and civil society in India and Pakistan to step back from the edge of conflict and to exercise constraint. The real causes of conflict in the region—important contributing factors to instability and the rise of extremism—include rampant poverty, inequalities, illiteracy, and lack of investment in human capital. Pakistan has lost more than 60 000 lives in fighting domestic terrorism in its tribal areas and Baluchistan, costing its economy at least $120 billion. Economic losses to the region are massive and simply unsustainable. It has been estimated that an additional terrorist incident per million persons reduces GDP per capita growth by about 1.5 per cent. These resources could have been spent on human development, religious harmony, and the promotion of grassroots democracy. Political leaders in both countries must move away from conflict and pursue diplomacy, dialogue, and the promotion of person to person contact and engagement between civil society representatives and youth. There is no conflict that cannot be resolved at the negotiating table. As the two countries once again stare into an abyss of disaster, we fervently call for peace, pragmatism, and the prevention of further violence. (The authors are: Dr. Arun Mitra, Vice President, Indian Doctors for Peace and Development; Zulfiqar A Bhutta, Center of Excellence in Women and Child Health, The Aga Khan University, Karachi 75500, Pakistan (ZAB); and Dr. Arun Mitra, Zulfiqar A Bhutta and Richard Horton, The Lancet, London, UK (RH). The views expressed are strictly personal)last_img read more

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A metaphor for capitalism

first_imgIs there a Marxist position on fashion? Maybe not a “position” as such – though some Marxists have also been notable fashionistas (and others, distinctly scruffy dressers). However, a Marxist approach can reveal quite a lot. Fashion is (arguably) unique to and a characteristic of our species. Some other creatures adorn, advertise, or conceal themselves by “wearing foreign objects.” But in no case (as far as is known) is there any significant social transmission or evolution of habit. And clothing – its wearing and manufacture – is peculiar to humanity. Also Read – A special kind of bondHuman self-ornamentation goes back a long way. Anthropologists have speculated on its social purpose but, while materials or ornaments depend on what is locally available or can be procured from further afield, only in very few cases is there any clear evidence of the environmental or functional determination of the precise detail of body adornment. In other words, this seems to be just “fashion.” This seems likely to have been the case also for most of human history. With the emergence of class societies, including slavery and feudalism, fashion took on a new role, as a marker of social status. Different professions or craft guilds – from clergy to cobbler – distinguished and identified themselves through dress. Sometimes, as in royal courts from Ancient Regime France to Regency Britain, this could take an extreme form. The dress became an essential element of the “rules of behaviour” – emphasising and maintaining social distinctions. But within capitalism, fashion takes on a whole new character. Marx saw fashion as a dynamo as well as a product of capitalism. Clothing was central to the industrial revolution; textile manufacture inaugurated the factory system in Britain with adults and children labouring in appalling conditions spinning cloth made from cotton produced by slaves on the other side of the Atlantic. The market for the product was driven not just by need, but by fashion. Also Read – Insider threat managementEsther Leslie, a Marxist analyst of modern culture, describes how Marx saw fashion as a metaphor for capitalism. In Capital, Marx wrote of “the murderous, meaningless caprices of fashion” linked to the general anarchy of capitalist production. Capitalism requires constant novelty – not just in the mode of production, but in products themselves – in order to maintain sales and profits. Alongside “normal” business cycles and changes due to external factors such as the weather, “fashion, and the sudden placing of large orders that have to be executed in the shortest possible time” leads to precarious work; periods of “inhuman toil” alternating with starvation – a situation which intensified with the development of railways and telegraphs. Marx quotes a manufacturer whose customers travel every fortnight from Glasgow, Manchester, and Edinburgh to the wholesale warehouses supplied by his factory “and give small orders requiring immediate execution, instead of buying from stock as they used to do.” Not much has changed – except that the production process has been globalised and is dominated by finance capital. Its excesses are manifested in episodes such as the collapse of Rana Plaza factory in Bangladesh in 2013, where in appalling conditions and on starvation wages, workers sweated producing fashion items for Benetton, The Children’s Place, Cato Fashions, Joe Fresh, and Walmart. Some 1,134 garment workers were killed and 2,500 maimed. Clothing accounts for 79 per cent of total exports from Bangladesh; 43 per cent of US clothing workers are paid below the minimum wage and illegal low pay and long hours are rife in the British textile industry. Fashion is not only exploitative of people; it is hugely destructive of the planet. Agrochemicals – pesticides and fertilisers – account for 77 per cent of the cost of raw cotton production in Kenya. Critics point to the way that expensive haute couture is inseparable from the wasteful and exploitative mass production and consumption of “cheap” fashion items, worn for a short time and then discarded. And fashion has, in parallel with and intimately connected to its economic role as a vehicle for profit and exploitation, a cultural and ideological function. Marx had a particular reason to be aware of the distinctions of dress. Having often had to pawn his own coat, he could not gain admittance to the British Library without redeeming it. Its use-value was not just keeping Marx warm; it was also a signifier of respectability without which he would have been denied access. Marx gave the name “rag-proletariat” (lumpenproletariat) to the poorest sections of the working class, immediately identifiable by their clothing. “White-collar” workers don’t get their hands – or clothes – dirty. They signify their distance from manual workers in their dress. Dress remains a signifier of social class distinctions and is sometimes inverted; the practice of going without a tie (or often, even a collar), unheard of a few decades ago, is normal among academics and increasingly tolerated among financial executives; it is often the lowest-paid workers (security, attendants) who are required to wear a uniform. Ironically, the dress is becoming a marker of prestige and power between institutions as well as within them. As Julie Burchill declared: “Satellites preen, superpowers dress down.” Fashion is not just clothes. All fashion has its “derivatives” – shoes, bags, and accessories, which are great profit makers. Plus, of course, the multibillion-dollar hair and beauty product industry. Tansy Hoskins, in her book Stitched Up: The Anti-Capitalist Book of Fashion, shows how capitalism “stitches up” its consumers as well as its workers and its raw materials – today not just in clothing but in pretty much every other commodity imaginable, from cars to the latest iPhone or other “must-have.” Fashion is central to capitalism’s underlying philosophy of “planned obsolescence” – the “systematic attempt of business to make us wasteful, debt-ridden, permanently discontented individuals.” And it is central also to capitalism’s ability (so far) to ride out its crises by super-exploitation of both workers and consumers. Fashion is the ultimate vehicle for alienation, reification, and commodity fetishism, persuading us to think that we “belong” – when we don’t – or to think that we’re “different” – when we’re not. “Fashion is a total system” and, says Leslie, far from being an aberration, it is at the core of capitalism and provides “a lens through which to explore it.” Hoskins declares: “As an illustration of how capitalism operates, fashion is perfect. Inequality and exploitation are straight out of the past. “Just as Queen Victoria wore dresses stitched by seamstresses who went blind in the candlelight, so today’s society it-girls now wear dresses stitched by Romanian sweatshop workers paid 99 pence an hour.” Fashion allows exploitation to pretend to be something else, when in fact the beating heart of the fashion industry is not creativity but profit. “To understand this, you need to look no further than the writings of Marx and Engels, more than a century ago.” Today, fashion attempts “to persuade us to buy things we don’t need with money we don’t have produced by people and processes we prefer not to think about, to create impressions that won’t last on people we don’t know.” Under socialism, it is likely there will continue to be “fashions” – in dress and in much else. Some of us may still remain “dedicated followers of fashion.” But fashion will no longer be dictated by the owners and managers of capital and subordinated to profit.(Courtesy: Morning Star. The source of this article is Marx Memorial Library)last_img read more

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When the German FA banned womens football

first_imgBerlin: At 75, former footballer Baerbel Wohlleben still clearly remembers the moment in 1974 when a journalist asked, “but when you head the ball, doesn’t it mess up your hair?” At that time, Wohlleben had already turned 30, but was only officially three years into her career as a footballer, because until 1971 the German Football Association (DFB) banned women from playing in competitions. Moreover, any clubs allowing women to train or play at their facilities was liable to be sanctioned. “…this aggressive sport is essentially alien to the nature of woman,” decreed the DFB in 1955. “In the fight for the ball, the feminine grace vanishes, body and soul will inevitably suffer harm.” Back then, even the idea of women wearing shorts was clearly a problem for the DFB as “the display of the body offends decency and modesty”. Nevertheless, the sexist rules from a bygone era did not stop Wohlleben playing football and she will be cheering the German team at the women’s World Cup kick-off in France this June. At the age of 10, she kicked a ball for the first time on July 5, 1954 – the day West Germany won the World Cup for the first time by beating hot-favourites Hungary 3-2 in the final in Bern, Switzerland. The “Miracle of Bern”, as Germans still regard it, saw their team come from 2-0 down against the mighty Hungarians. “We were invited to a neighbour’s house and it was the first time I had seen a television,” remembered Wohlleben. “After the victory, we celebrated like crazy, went down to the garden and that’s where I said ‘I want to play football’. For the next four years, she trained alongside boys at the same club as her three brothers, even playing some games at Under-15 level. However, with women’s football then frowned upon in German society, Wohlleben drifted away. She played handball until, aged 27, a group of girls assembled a team in Woerrstadt, near her village of Ingelheim, where Wohlleben still lives. “We were playing friendlies, on pitches which were half grass, half sand, because competition was forbidden by the DFB,” explained Wohlleben. “We never had any training sessions together, but played a few games against Denmark and Italy. The DFB knew it, they allowed us to play, but still told us ‘you do not have the right to form a national team’.” Wohlleben never actually became a full international, because she was no longer playing regularly by the time the first recognised women’s international took place when a West Germany team beat the Swiss 5-1 in 1982. In 1974, the first sanctioned women’s championships took place in Germany and Woerrstadt made it to the final, beating Gelsenkirchen 4-0 with Wohlleben scoring her team’s superb third goal from a tight angle 20 metres out. She was soon in for a surprise. “I received a phonecall from Cologne, from the national (television) broadcaster, and was told my goal was chosen as the goal of the month for September – a woman had never won the award before,” Wohlleben said. “I didn’t believe it – I thought it was nonsense.” After some persuasion that it was not a hoax, she proudly received her medal in Cologne, but, 45 years on, she still chuckles at the questions she faced. “What does your husband think about it? Does he agree with it? Who looks after the home when you’re playing? “I told them, ‘my husband can also cook, why shouldn’t he?’ “It was a different time, you have to remembered that until 1977, German women were not allowed to work without the written consent of their husbands.” Even in the twilight of her years, Wohlleben is still a strong personality with infectious enthusiasm – she claims to have never suffered directly from sexism as a footballer. “Those watching laughed at the girls who were playing badly, but they had nothing to laugh at with me – I had been playing football for years with the boys and I had some talent. “There were some obscene expressions that were below the belt, but that just reflects the character of the individual, who behaves like that.”last_img read more

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Barclay Pettrey split kicking duties

The story of Devin Barclay’s 2009 season was immortalized when he made the winning field goal in overtime against Iowa to make the Buckeyes the outright Big Ten champions. But the walk-on and former soccer player once again shared the spotlight with starting kicker Aaron Pettrey at the Rose Bowl Game.Barclay took over the season after Pettrey went out with a knee injury against New Mexico State on Oct. 31 that required surgery.The second-string kicker had a rough start, missing a field goal in the second half of Ohio State’s 45-0 win over the Aggies. However, he quickly recovered and became a solid contributor to the Buckeye special teams unit.When Pettrey was deemed healthy enough to play in his final game as a Buckeye, coach Jim Tressel decided to give him the chance while still rewarding Barclay for his regular season performance.“It was two days ago that he told me we were going to be sharing kicks,” Barclay said of getting the news from Tressel. “He was going to be taking extra points and field goals outside of 42 yards.”True to the plan, Barclay kicked and made three field goals from 19, 30 and 38 yards out, while Pettrey made a field goal from 45 yards in the second quarter to put the Buckeyes up 16-10. Barclay also kicked all six kickoffs.Though Barclay said that it was unfortunate that Pettrey was injured, he said he has benefited from stepping in while Pettrey was out.“It’s definitely a great opportunity to get some confidence for next year,” Barclay said of when he will likely step into the full-time starting spot. “I can take this and look back on some of the things I need to work on.”Barclay also echoed many of his teammates when he said that playing in front of over 93,000 people was an experience unlike any other.“When you get that kind of win and you actually get to be a part of the win, it holds its own,” Barclay said. “I’m just very glad that [Pettrey] and I got to play together in the Rose Bowl.”Pettrey, who is a senior, is set to play in an All-Star game in February, Tressel said, and is targeting a path to the NFL. read more

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Ohio States John Simon named quarterfinalist for Lott Award as Wisconsin looms

Ohio State junior defensive lineman John Simon was named one of 20 quarterfinalists for the Lott IMPACT Trophy. The trophy, named after former University of Southern California safety Ronnie Lott, “recognizes college football’s Defensive Player of the Year who best exemplifies integrity, maturity, performance, academics, community and tenacity,” according to the award’s website. Simon has been a force for the Buckeyes this year, recording 26 tackles, 7.5 tackles for loss and 3.0 sacks for the season. He also has three pass breakups and three passes defended. He recorded 8.0 tackles and 4.0 tackles for loss during OSU’s 17-7 victory over Illinois on Oct. 15. The performance earned him Lott IMPACT player of the week honors in addition to being named College Football Performance Award’s national defensive lineman of the week. Nebraska’s Lavonte David, Wisconsin’s Aaron Henry, Purdue’s Joe Holland, Michigan’s Jordan Kovacs, and Michigan State’s Jerel Worthy join Simon on the list as members from the Big Ten. The Big Ten leads all conferences with six players on the list. The SEC was second with four. Simon and the Buckeyes take on Wisconsin Saturday. In 2010, Simon had six tackles against the Badgers, but despite his performance, Wisconsin handed the Buckeyes their only loss of the season, 31-18. Freshman Braxton Miller will start at quarterback for the Buckeyes, but if Miller has to leave the game for any reason, sophomore Kenny Guiton will be the man to replace him according to OSU offensive coordinator Jim Bollman. Although previously implied, Bollman confirmed Wednesday that Guiton has officially passed senior Joe Bauserman as the team’s No. 2 option at quarterback. Kickoff for Saturday’s game against the Badgers is scheduled for 8 p.m. at Ohio Stadium in Columbus, Ohio. read more

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