Program educates local teens

first_imgSaint Mary’s senior Cat Cleary and junior Laura Corrigan teamed up this semester to work with high school students in South Bend through a program called “Use Your Voice.” They created the program, directed toward teens, to raise awareness about sexual harassment in schools, as well as to improve prevention methods and responsiveness to the issue. After receiving the 2011-2012 Campus Action Project grant from the American Association of University Women (AAUW), Cleary and Corrigan said they used the funds to implement “Use Your Voice” at four high schools in the South Bend Community School Corporation through 60-minute afterschool workshops. “Our goals for this program and this semester are to start a conversation at each of these schools about sexual harassment because dialogue is a great step in the right direction,” Cleary said. “We also know this is a complex issue that needs a coordinated community response, so our goal is for students, teachers, parents and other high school staff to gain knowledge from this.” Cleary said last summer the AAUW polled 1,965 students from grades 7 to 12 about their thoughts and experiences with sexual harassment. According to the survey, 30 percent witnessed online sexual harassment and 44 percent experienced sexual harassment in person. “We know this is a complex issue that needs a coordinated community response, so our goal is for students, teachers, parents and other high school staff to gain knowledge from this,” Cleary said. Cleary and Corrigan said they learned about the Campus Action Project grant through the National Student Advisory Council. They received the grant from AAUW based on a research report they released in November about harassment in schools, specifically grades 7 through 12. Cleary was also appointed as a representative of women at universities across the United States last year, while Corrigan is one of 10 women on the National Student Advisory Council this year. Cleary and Corrigan said they want “Use Your Voice” to raise awareness about sexual harassment and make schools a safer place. “We really want teens to know that they have a safe place to report sexual harassment issues to,” Corrigan said. “Sexual harassment in schools is a preventable issue that students should not have to simply live with.”last_img read more

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One-man show chronicles the life of Clarence Darrow

first_img One-man show chronicles the life of Clarence Darrow A 48-star flag, three dark wooden chairs, a table, and dramatic flair will bring legendary defense lawyer Clarence Darrow to life at the Bar’s Annual Meeting in Orlando.Actor Paul Morella plays Darrow in “A Passion for Justice: The Clarence Darrow Story,” by Jack Marshall and Terry Kester, as part of the Chester Bedell Memorial Luncheon sponsored by the Trial Lawyers Section and the Chester Bedell Foundation, on Friday, June 27, at the Orlando Marriott World Center. (See the May issue of the Bar Journal for registration information or The Florida Bar Web site: www.flabar.org.)“I like to think it’s the spirit of Darrow doing the show,” said Morella, taking a break in rehearsals for another performance. “I’m just the convoy he channels through.”Morella, son of an attorney, is no stranger to lawyer roles, having played attorney Jarreld Schwab opposite Julia Roberts in The Pelican Briefs, appeared as prosecuting attorney Horace Gilmer in the world premier of To Kill a Mockingbird, and received a Helen Hayes Award nomination for his performance as Roy Cohn in Tony Kushner’s epic, Angels in America. An MFA (acting) graduate of Catholic University, Morella, 46, also teaches persuasion techniques as part of the Trial Practice Program at the Washington College of Law.Morella said the idea for the show came when he was working with Marshall and Kester on the one-man Darrow play, initially made famous by Henry Fonda, to be performed in Washington, D.C. But at the same time a national road show of the play was on tour, and it exercised its option to prohibit any other performance of that script in Washington, one of its scheduled stops.“We said, ‘What would Clarence Darrow do?’ So we put together our own show,” Morella said. That included poring over books about Darrow, including his autobiography, and trial transcripts from all phases of his career. One of the books focused on Darrow’s celebrated defense of himself late in his career, when he was charged with attempting to bribe a juror in one of his cases. That book took the position Darrow actually attempted that act, even though he won his own acquittal.“He went through a sense of redemption and focus and decided to focus more on the individual and less on Clarence Darrow, and became a better person for that experience,” Morella said.Darrow is an compelling character, both for actors and lawyers, he said.“He has an incredible amount of material out there. He was a social philosopher, a reformer, a poet, a lawyer,” Morella said. “Law was the outlet he found to channel his gifts, his innate sympathy for his fellow man. If he found someone else in trouble, he couldn’t help but get involved. He would mesmerize juries for hours, sometimes speaking extemporaneously.”The performance, which can be tailored from about an hour to two hours, covers all aspects of Darrow’s career, from early labor cases to the Leopold and Loeb murder defense, to the Scopes Monkey trial to First Amendment issues.“I think the worst thing is his ego and his hubris, and in some ways that contributes to his best things. Because I think his enduring legacy is he had the uncanny ability to articulate what he wanted to say in the moment and yet recognize how it would resonate in future generations,” Morella said. “I don’t think you’d want to change a word in some of his summations.”Morella and his collaborators also tinkered with the form of the one-person play, which usually focuses on reminisces. For Darrow, he said the effort is to recreate parts of his illustrious career, with the audience becoming the jury as Morella is recreating a summation.Comments from those who have seen his performance in “The Clarence Darrow Story” have been glowing.“Impressive, absorbing.. . The material is legendary and Paul Morella plays Darrow impeccably; his fluidity in the role seems natural, almost effortless,” according to a reviewer from The Washington Post. “The presentation was truly great. The acclaim has been unanimous,” wrote John Hannah, Jr., chief judge of the U.S. District Court, Eastern District of Texas, who hired Morella for a judicial program. One-man show chronicles the life of Clarence Darrowcenter_img June 1, 2003 Regular Newslast_img read more

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CRS report looks at worker participation in employer-sponsored retirement plans

first_img 15SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Dennis Zuehlke Dennis is Compliance Manager for Ascensus. Mr. Zuehlke provides clients with technical support on tax-advantaged accounts (including individual retirement accounts, health savings accounts, simplified employee pension plans, and Coverdell education … Web: www.ascensus.com Details As Congress sets its sights on tax reform, the Congressional Research Service (CRS) has prepared a new report that focuses on worker participation in employer-sponsored retirement plans. The report provides data on the percentage of U.S. workers who have access to and participate in employer-sponsored pension plans. It is certain to pique Congress’ interest, as it scrutinizes the effectiveness of tax-advantaged savings plans as part of overall tax reform.The CRS report, prepared for members of Congress, is conducted by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and uses data from the National Compensation Survey (NCS), which looks at employer costs for employee compensation and the availability of employee benefits among U.S. workers. The report looks at access to and participation in both defined benefit and defined contribution plans. In recent decades, defined contribution plans have become the dominant employer-sponsored retirement plan in the private sector. The CRS report highlights how this shift from defined benefit plans to defined contribution plans affects worker participation in employer-sponsored pension plans. In a defined benefit plan, plan participants receive monthly payments during retirement that are based on a formula that typically uses a combination of length of service, contribution rate, and final years’ salary. In a defined contribution plan—such as a 401(k) or 403(b) plan—plan participants contribute a percentage of their salary to an individual account—often with an employer matching contribution—and receive payments during retirement based on the value of their individual account. Unlike a defined benefit plan, in a defined contribution plan, the onus is on the plan participant to contribute to her plan and to direct the plan investments from the options offered by the plan sponsor.The CRS report found that—while not all workers have access to an employer-sponsored pension plan—the percentage of workers who participate in a plan to which they have access differs between defined benefit and defined contribution plans. Among workers who have access to a defined benefit plan, 85 percent participate in the plan. Among workers with access to a defined contribution plan, only 69 percent participate in the plan.There are a number of reasons for lower participation rates among workers with defined contribution plans. Unless the plan has an automatic enrollment feature—workers are automatically enrolled in the plan at a default contribution rate unless they opt out—many workers simply fail to enroll in the plan. And because defined contribution plans are generally funded by contributions from workers, some workers may be unwilling to forgo current income to fund their future retirement. Unfortunately, this means that those workers also forgo any employer matching contributions to the plan, effectively leaving “free money” on the table.A number of other factors also affect participation, including access to an employer-sponsored pension plan. Access to an employer-sponsored pension plan is usually greater for full-time workers, state and local public-sector workers, workers in higher paying occupations, and those employed by larger firms. The CRS report found that these factors significantly affect participation. Key report findings include the following.Participation in employer-sponsored pension plans is greater for full-time workers than part-time workers. Among private-sector workers, 65 percent of full-time workers participate in a pension plan compared to 22 percent of part-time workers. And among state and local public-sector workers, 89 percent of full-time workers participate in a pension plan compared to 34 percent of part-time workers.Participation in employer-sponsored pension plans is greater for state and local public-sector workers than for private-sector workers. For state and local pubic-sector workers, 81 percent of workers participate in the plan, whereas only 54 percent of private-sector workers participate. And unlike private-sector workers, most state and local public-sector workers are more likely to participate in a defined benefit plan rather than a defined contribution plan.Participation in employer-sponsored pension plans is greater for workers in higher paying occupations. Among private-sector workers, 76 percent of workers in occupations with the highest 25 percent of average wages participate in the plan, compared to 22 percent of private-sector workers in occupations with the lowest 25 percent of average wages.Participation in employer-sponsored pension plans is greater for workers employed by larger firms. For example, 76 percent of private-sector workers employed by firms with 500 or more employees participate in the plan, whereas only 33 percent of private-sector workers employed by firms with fewer than 50 employees participate in the plan.This lower participation rate is significant from a public policy standpoint, as the number of Fortune 500 companies sponsoring an open conventional defined benefit plan fell from 50 percent in 1998 to 5 percent in 2015, according to an analysis by Willis Towers Watson. And because part-time workers, lower-paid workers, and workers employed by smaller firms are less likely to have access to an employer-sponsored retirement plan, the public policy implications of their lower participation is likely to be scrutinized by Congress as they assess the overall effectiveness of current tax-advantaged savings policies as part of comprehensive tax reform.Congress has held hearings and proposed approaches to increase retirement savings in the past, but no major federal legislation has been enacted since 2006. Even if Congress does not act now, states are increasingly looking at ways to cover workers who may not have access to an employer-sponsored retirement plan. Five states have enacted legislation to provide a state-based automatic IRA program for workers not covered by an employer-sponsored retirement plan. And legislation has been introduced in more than two dozen other states to set up or study options for state-based retirement savings programs for workers not covered by employer-sponsored retirement plans.last_img read more

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France Confirms Oil Slick after Grande America Sinks

first_imgFrench authorities have detected an oil slick at the sinking site of the ro-ro container vessel Grande America, according to the Maritime Prefecture of Atlantic.The slick was detected in the afternoon hours of March 13 during an overflight by French Navy aircraft. The oil traces were confirmed by offshore supply ship VN SAPEUR, which remained at the site after the fire-stricken ConRo sank.At the time, the Maritime Prefecture of Atlantic said that the oil slick was about ten kilometers long and one kilometer wide. French authorities dispatched the offshore supply ship Argonaute from Brest, and reportedly three additional vessels, to help with the oil cleanup operations.European Maritime Safety Agency (EMSA) was asked for assistance with pollution control.The vessel was loaded with 365 containers, 45 of which were listed as containing hazardous materials, local media cited the Maritime Prefecture of Atlantic. The ship also had 2,200 tons of fuel in its bunkers.The 1997-built Grande America suffered a fire on March 10 while en route from Hamburg to Casablanca, and subsequently developed a worsening starboard list. It sank in the afternoon hours of March 12 in the Bay of Biscay, some 180 nautical miles west of the French coast in a water depth of around 4,600 meters.The vessel’s owner Grimaldi earlier appointed the salvage company Ardent to provide assistance with the incident.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

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The Nelson Daily Team of the Week: The Kootenay Senior Bowlers

first_imgThis team gets together every week at the Nelson Bowling Alley . . . and every year at the B.C. Senior’s Games. The Nelson Daily salutes the 2010 B.C. Senior’s Games gold, silver and bronze medal winners from the bowling alley with Team of the Week honors. The group was in Campbell River in September to compete in the annual games. The team includes, back row, L-R, Lorna Hamilton, Effie Rains and Blaine Rains. Front, Linc Vital, Rene Forest, Rusty Denny, Lola Swetlikoe, Lee McNeil, Dawn Williams and Audry Kempin.last_img read more

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Warriors mailbag: How do the Warriors flip the switch?

first_imgKlay Thompson subscribes. You can too for just 11 cents a day for 11 months + receive a free Warriors Championship book. Sign me up!OAKLAND — What will it take for the Warriors’ switch to flip? Do they need to simply lift their finger, or they need to fix the power broker?It’s an interesting question considering the Warriors’ current state of being. On one hand, the Warriors have become used to overcoming regular-season boredom before winning three NBA titles in the past four years. On the …last_img read more

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Quick Tip: Learn How a Color Grading Qualifier Works

first_imgLearn how a colorist’s qualifier works and how to use the controls to fine tune a key!Color grading applications have the ability to pull a key (similar to keying a green screen), but instead of making the keyed color transparent, the program uses the matte to affect either the selected color or every color but the one selected.There are 3 main controls, each having a few sub-control to fine-tune. The three main controls are hue, saturation, and luminance qualifiers.The hue qualifier limits the key based on hue. The center control shifts the selection up and down the hue spectum. The width control limits which hues are selected by narrowing the range. The soft control adjusts the tolerance (hues only partly selected are partially affected – basically treated as gray on an alpha matte). Last, the symmetry control lets you have more softness on one side or the other.The saturation and luminance qualifiers give you upper and lower limit controls, plus individual softness controls for either side. In color grading applications you can use any combination of these three controls, or you can just use one of them, giving you a huge amount of control in pulling secondary keys.last_img read more

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a month agoLippi: Sarri can’t complain about what he has at Juventus

first_imgAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Lippi: Sarri can’t complain about what he has at Juventusby Carlos Volcanoa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveFormer Juventus coach Marcello Lippi says Maurizio Sarri cannot complain about what he’s found in Turin.Sarri, after recovering from a bout of pneumonia, was in the Juve dugout for the first time in Saturday’s 0-0 draw at Fiorentina.Lippi commented: “I don’t see anything in particular with the environment. Maybe he didn’t expect to find such a large squad. “He had a very tight squad at Napoli. But he doesn’t have big problems. I think there is mutual trust. “It takes time and he’ll need some months to change the working method and mentality, but everyone wants to change. Fiorentina played an excellent game against Juventus, so the Bianconeri went under a little in difficulty.” last_img read more

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Klaveness Names Its 1st NextGeneration Combination Carrier

first_imgNorway-based shipowner Klaveness Combination Carriers (KCC) has named the first vessel in its next generation of combination carriers, the CLEANBUs.MV Baru was named at New Yangzi Shipyard in China on October 17, 2018.The 83,600 dwt Baru features a length of 228.4 meters and a width of 34.5 meters. It is said to be a high-tech, digital vessel with new, innovative solutions.MV Baru sets new standard in environmentally friendly deep sea shipping: https://t.co/UFJg0Fmaf6 #KlavenessCombinationCarriers pic.twitter.com/CE63ETo8wv— Torvald Klaveness (@klaveness) October 18, 2018The CLEANBU vessels will be employed in tanker-dry bulk combination trades with minimum ballast, according to the company.“With the delivery of CLEANBUs, KCC will expand its (…) combi-service into the petroleum and petrochemical industry. These vessels provide the most environmentally friendly and cost-efficient freight solution around today, meeting the highest standards of safety. The CLEANBUs have up to 40% lower CO2 emissions per ton mile transported cargo, and go a long way in meeting IMO’s 2050 targets of a 50% reduction in CO2 emissions from shipping,” Engebret Dahm, Managing Director of KCC, said.MV Baru and the other four contracted CLEANBU vessels will be delivered from the New Yangzi Shipyard in the period from November 2018 to August 2020. In addition, KCC has fixed-price options to contract a further four CLEANBUs for delivery in 2020 and 2021.With the delivery of the MV Baru, KCC will operate a fleet of ten combination carriers.Earlier this week, the company was registered on NOTC for trading, following a successful private placement of common shares in September 2018.KCC was established in April 2018 with an aim to own and operate modern combination carriers by providing environmentally friendly transportation system with “the lowest carbon emissions in the industry”.last_img read more

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