DNA TESTS PROVE MISSING BODY IS DIRECT RELATION OF DONEGAL MAN

first_imgJames McGlynnA coroner’s court heard today that the body of a man washed up off Donegal almost 30 years ago is a direct relation of well-known Letterkenny man Jim McGlynn.The findings brings to an end a mystery which Mr McGlynn has been trying to resolve for decades. Mr McGlynn was convinced that the body was that of his brother Noel who left the family home in 1983 never to be seen again.A body washed up off Dunfanaghy a few days later was buried in an unmarked grave at the Holy Cross graveyard.It was widely thought the body may have been that of an American man who had gone missing locally at the time.However Jim McGlynn always believed it was his brother.A DNA sample was taken from the body buried in the graveyard and this was sent to a DNA profiling laboratory in Wales for independent analysis.Previous inquests heard descriptions of the body found and that of the missing Noel McGlynn which cast doubt on whether the body was the missing Donegal man or not.However Mr Jim McGlynn maintained it was always that of his brother.And today Coroner John Cannon was told today that the DNA sample matched that of Jim McGlynn mean that in all likelihood the body is that of Noel McGlynn.DNA TESTS PROVE MISSING BODY IS DIRECT RELATION OF DONEGAL MAN was last modified: March 8th, 2013 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:DunfanaghyJIm McGlynnLetterkenny Coroner’s Courtlast_img read more

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Science Proves the Morally Obvious

first_imgWhen scientists find that virtue brings reward and vice bring trouble, are they doing a better job than preachers and parents?  Hold that thought while reading some of the things scientists have been telling us lately about ourselves.“R-Rated Movies Increase Likelihood of Underage Children Trying Alcohol.”  Thank Science Daily for that bit of advice that emanated from Dartmouth University.  A study published in Prevention Science “showed that R-rated movies not only contain scenes of alcohol use that prompt adolescents to drink, they also jack up the sensation seeking tendency, which makes adolescents more prone to engage in all sorts of risky behaviors.”“Kids Taught Self-Control Behave Better at School.”  Parents might not have known that without help from an article on Live Science about a study conducted by University of Rochester Medical Center.  “Children taught skills to monitor and control their anger and other emotions improved their classroom behavior and had significantly fewer school disciplinary referrals and suspensions, according to new research.”“Video-game ownership may interfere with young boys’ academic functioning,” said PhysOrg.  Parents may be relieved to have the authority of science to back up their orders to go to the bedroom and do the homework.  Whether it was ethical to experiment with 6- to 9-year olds for four months to find this out was not stated.  It could be an issue, though, because “the boys who received the video-game system at the beginning of the study had significantly lower reading and writing scores four months later compared with the boys receiving the video-game system later on.”  What permanent setbacks and bad habits were created in the minds of the little boy lab rats?  “These findings suggest that video games may be displacing after-school academic activities and may impede reading and writing development in young boys,” the article continued.  “The authors note that when children have problems with language at this young age, they tend to have a tougher time acquiring advanced reading and writing skills later on.”  Maybe they justified this experiment on the grounds that sacrificing a few boys for the sake of scientific knowledge of possible practical benefit to the public was morally acceptable.“New Research Looks at Beliefs About God’s Influence in Everyday Life,” wrote Science Daily, noting the truly astonishing finding that “Most Americans believe God is concerned with their personal well-being and is directly involved in their personal affairs, according to new research out of the University of Toronto.”  My, where have the scientists been?  Apparently not in church – nor in logic class.  “Many of us might assume that people of higher social class standing tend to reject beliefs about divine intervention,” explained Scott Schieman (U of Toronto).  “However, my findings indicate that while this is true among those less committed to religious life, it is not the case for people who are more committed to religious participation and rituals.”  Maybe he expected that more of the religious were participating in spite of their beliefs.  On one thing he was clear, though: the job of interpreting this phenomenon belongs to scientists: “Given the frequency of God talk in American culture, especially in some areas of political discourse, this is an increasingly important area for researchers to document, describe, and interpret.”“Happiness Is Experiences, Not Stuff,” explained Live Science.  Eight studies converged on that finding that was published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.  The researchers based their conclusions on questionnaires that asked participants things like visualizing a vacation deal, or how satisfied they felt with a purchase they made.  It’s not clear if there was some sort of satisfactionometer instrument used, or what the metric units were.“Modern man found to be generally monogamous, moderately polygamous,” announced PhysOrg, accompanied by the iconic image of man emerging from the apes.  This study was done not by observing human behavior but by discerning patterns in the genes.  The author did not make any value judgments about monogamy, however.“Students’ Perceptions of Earth’s Age Influence Acceptance of Human Evolution,” a story on Science Daily announced, before going off into a discussion of polls and the law.  The authors of a survey published in Evolution apparently didn’t catch the logic that without belief in deep time, belief in evolution is unlikely.  The lead author used the survey to give an NCSE-style application: “The role of the Earth’s age is a key variable that we can use to improve education about evolution, which is important because it is the unifying principle of biology,” said Sehoya Cotner (U of Minnesota), noting with horror that “about one in four high school biology teachers in the upper Midwest are giving students the impression that creationism is a viable explanation for the origins of life on Earth” – something she denounced as “just not acceptable.  The Constitution prohibits teaching creationism in schools,” she added, something readers might have trouble finding in the Constitution, which does not mention teaching or creationism.  It might also be hard to defend that statement since the Declaration of Independence, written by the same group of founding fathers, had said all men are created equal and endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights.On the other hand, scientists sometimes announce counter-intuitive findings that make moral judgments.  For instance, Live Science told its readers that some looting in Chile after the earthquake might have been caused not by loose morals but by survival instincts.  Taking food could be “excusable given the circumstances,” the article said, and “if people do take non-necessities, such as TVs, they’re probably not thinking about right and wrong since these uncertain situations can lead to a breakdown of social norms”.  Was that a reference to situational ethics?  The article noted that most people act altruistically in the aftermath of disasters.  Daniel Kruger at the University of Michigan commented, “If we were absolutely selfish when disasters like this strike, I would be surprised if we survived as a species.”    More and more, scientists are inserting themselves into the moral dimensions of human life.  Not only do they scrutinize and analyze our moral instincts, they also play preacher and give us advice.  Live Science, for instance wrote about “How to Grow Old Gracefully.”  Much of the advice is common sense, or advice you would hear from a doctor.  But Rachael Rettner also noted that “Churchgoing and a generally sunny outlook on life have also been linked to longer, healthier lives.”  (It is left as an exercise whether following that path would promote the belief in evolution that Cotner said is important.)  What is notable is that the scientific researchers seem to expect that their opinions on these matters should carry more weight than those of religious leaders and other scholars or experts.  Do religious leaders, theologians and non-scientists have any voice left in answering the third of the three great philosophical questions, (1) Ontology: What exists?; (2) Epistemology: How do we know what we know?; (3) Ethics: How should we live our lives?Not that long ago people wanting a moral compass would seek the Scriptures and talk to a trusted pastor, priest or rabbi.  Many still do, but the cultural elite act as if those opinions are of no value, and we must look to scientists for answers.  They treat “the religious” as lab rats like the little boys with video games.  What if the tables were turned?  What if the scientists had to sit in church and hear a preacher say, “Thus saith the Lord”?  And why shouldn’t they?  They need to repent.  They are breaking the Ten Commandments.    A logical truth overlooked by researchers is that scientists have absolutely nothing to say about ethics without input from a theological world view.  If naturalism is their world view, ethics reduces to Stuff Happens.  There are no gridlines, guidelines or goals.  They do not have the functional operators in their toolkit for h(S), this stuff Should happen, or h(!S), this stuff Should not happen.  Should is not in their vocabulary.  Only a theological perspective can say should.  Indeed, only a theological perspective makes the three philosophical questions meaningful and approachable.  Consequently, we just caught several scientists (in the stories above) plagiarizing Judeo-Christian assumptions about right and wrong – that is, using their principles without attribution, as if they were their own.  Thou shalt not steal.  Thou shalt not bear false witness.*Exercise:  List some other Commandments the scientists might be breaking by pretending to exercise secular, naturalistic authority on moral matters.  You can find some suggestions in the introduction to our online book, The World’s Greatest Creation Scientists.*Steal=h(!S)=0; BFW=h(!S)=0; source=Ex 20.(Visited 7 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Reading South Africa’s state of mind

first_imgTim CohenAt critical times in South Africa’s political unfolding, the void created by directional uncertainty has been filled with books. In a way, a brief scan of the new books on the shelves of bookshops provides a snapshot view of the current state of any nation.  I remember, in the early 1990s during South Africa’s transition period, the shelves seemed overflowing with advice, biography and opinion. The biographies, particularly of politicians, were really a kind of vicarious introduction for people who knew each other only vaguely; the new histories set the scene for the battles which would take place in the future over the negotiating table.Many of the books at that time were scenario planners of some kind or another. One popular book concerned something called the Mont Fleur Scenarios, which used a catchy bird analogy: the Ostrich pretended nothing was wrong, the Lame Duck meant negotiations would continue but unsatisfying slowly; the Icarus succeeded but flew to high too quickly and came crashing down to earth. But Flamingos take off slowly and fly high together; everyone is focused on gradualism and inclusiveness.South Africa is going through another period of political upheaval, and the changes are once again reflected in the bookshops – especially now at Christmas time as publishers and retailers hope to corner as much of the present buying trade as possible. Except, this time there are some notable differences. One of the most obvious is that there is a whole new category of books: memoirs and quasi-memoirs. Many of the old bulls of the previous era seem keen to make a stab at posterity.This charge is led by Mark Gevisser’s Thabo Mbeki: the Dream Deferred, an extraordinary book about former president Thabo Mbeki which took a mammoth nine years to research and write. The book is extraordinary not so much for what it says about Mbeki’s recent history, but more for the background and history of the Mbeki family, which is beautifully recorded with painstaking and intimate detail. All this history is oddly revealing about what would become the former president’s vaulting ambitions and curious blind spots.In this category, a book about finance minister Trevor Manuel by former journalist Pippa Green called Choice, not Fate has just been published, and several others on other leading characters of the transition are in the works.Personally, I found one of the best in this category to be Shades of Difference: Mac Maharaj and the Struggle for South Africa, which was an odd kind of joint writing project between the ostensible author Pardraig O’Malley and former underground operative and one-time transport minister Mac Maharaj. The book was so absorbing because it is focused on the life of an extraordinary character whose successes and failures provided an oblique view on South Africa’s recent history.Maharaj was nothing if not hot-headed. He actually resigned from the African National Congress (ANC) several times, only to rejoin it again to ultimately become a key negotiator and successful and practical minister. The stories of his torture and making keys for his Robben Island cell are among the most terrifying, inspiring and heart-warming of all “struggle” stories.One the other side of the aisle, former leader of the opposition Tony Leon’s autobiography On the Contrary has been the surprise hit of the latest batch of writing on South Africa’s recent past. The personalities of Leon and Mbeki are so absolutely chalk and cheese, so much so that they were totally unable to bridge their political differences, not that they tried very hard.Leon’s history as a politician was marked by moments of vigorous fury and deep sarcasm which many in the ANC interpreted as a kind of suppressed racism. Mbeki, who cherishes civility, treated Leon with outright contempt, and Leon was often criticised for contributing to this poor relationship.But his book is even-handed, thoughtful and insightful. Although his tone was almost unbearably sharp while he was in office, with the benefit of hindsight it’s obvious how often his immediate judgements in fact turned out to be correct.There are also some revealing kiss-and-tell books about government written by insiders, the leading example of which is Andrew Feinstein’s After the Party. No publishing vista would be complete without a book of scandalous revelations, but Feinstein’s book has won plaudits for the passionate defence of democracy which underlies the critique.Some of what you might call old era books are still being published, notably a wonderful book by lawyer Peter Harris called In a Different Time about an old treason trial that took place in a town called Delmas.Another book that seems a bit like a through-back to the transition era scenario books is an interesting co-authored book by former secretary general of the National Union of Mineworkers  James Motlatsi and former chief executive of gold company AngloGold Ashanti. The book is called Do It and is interesting not only because it merges the ideas of two notable characters, but also because it extends beyond big economic issues into the personal and has suggestions on how people should live their lives. Oprah beware!One big difference between the current publishing splurge and the early 1990s is the number of books that focus not on the big picture, but on sub-issues, particularly focusing on the most complex and difficult social issues. The most obvious are books on HIV/Aids, such as Three-Letter Plague by Jonny Steinberg, and crime, such as A Country at War with Itself by Antony Altbekker.This new focus on specific topics rather than generalities reflects a progression of sorts toward a greater focus on some of the more intractable issues of governance. The theoretical has become practical.Those elegant flamingos all flying in unison look less like a the most preferred scenario than like oddly coloured, strangely shaped bird-like creatures. They are generally doing what they are supposed to be doing, but sleek swallows they are not.  Yet, neither is their much evidence of ostriches and Icari either, so perhaps a page as been turned on the era of simplistic and slightly patronising scenarios.Tim Cohen is a freelance journalist writing for a variety of South African publications. He is currently contracted as a columnist to Business Day and the Weekender, where he worked for most of his career, and financial website Moneyweb where he writes on business and corporate activity for an associate site called Dealweb. He was the 2004 Sanlam Financial Journalist of the Year.last_img read more

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Paul Modjadji says Dare to Dream

first_imgEveryone has dreams; for Paul Modjadji that dream is to help people reach their full potential.The Brand ambassador for the City of Tshwane and the Daring to Dream movement, Modjadji is the driving force behind the project. As a big dreamer himself, his story, to live his dream has resulted in him dancing on international stages; a solid example of what is possible for young people if they follow their dreams.“The Daring to Dream movement is a partnership between myself and internationally renowned Khulisa Social Solutions,” said Modjadji.The Daring to Dream movement aims to appeal to young people’s creativity and to encourage them to make a difference by giving backKhulisa Social Solutions is a non-governmental organisation (NGO) that addresses social vulnerabilities through multiple partnerships and internationally acclaimed best-practice programmes. It is a movement that aims to help South African youth build their dreams.“Khulisa Social Solutions is bringing in capacity and years of experience of working within the social development sphere, as well as scientific techniques of measuring the movement’s impact and success,” said Modjadji.WORKSHOPSPutting his motivational skills to the test, Modjadji will travel the country giving back to more than 10 000 children, hosting 10 workshops across the nation.Modjadji will conduct some 10 workshops in partnership with Khulisa and other NGOs.Workshops across Gauteng, Free State, Mpumalanga, North West Province, KwaZulu-Natal will tackle unique social problems, as identified by Khulisa. It is estimated that over 1 000 community members will be reached during this period. Phase two, covering the rest of the country, will kick off in early 2014.The departments of Social Development and Arts and Culture, local business and other parties will monitor each region’s progress through social media platforms. This will be done to reward the community that achieves the most, and to promote an entrepreneurial spirit amongst youth through support, mentoring and corporate volunteerism.“What makes the Daring to Dream movement unique is the platform; it allows for young people to begin to visualise a dream for themselves and the community they want to live in.”The movement inspires young people to begin to think positively and proactively and to use their creativity. It pushes the message that a brighter future begins with a thought, followed through. Young people are appealed to to imagine, dream and visualise the future they would like to see, said Modjadji.The Daring to Dream movement was launched on the 31 August 2013 in Tembisa, East Rand, Gauteng, to promote the idea of a society where young people are heard, encouraged and motivated. The movement aims to appeal to young people’s creativity and to encourage them to make a difference by giving back.Three divisions have been set up to help promote this project; a theatre company launched in Modjadji’s hometown, Hammanskraal; an annual art workshop and a Dare to Dream t-shirt line.Modjadji began the project in 2011 under the Dare to Dream Art Workshops.LET’S DANCEThe movement inspires young people to begin to think positively and proactively and to use their creativity (Images: Paul Modjadji)After completing his matric in 2002 Modjadji received a scholarship to attend the Danseorkestret Dance Foundation in Denmark; in the same year he received the Global Young Leaders Award from the Washington, DC-based Global Young Leaders Congress.He returned to South Africa in 2003, to study at the Tshwane University of Technology (TUT) Dance programme. In 2004 he landed a role on popular soapie Backstage, much loved by South African youth.Qualifications mounting, in 2005 he graduated with a degree in media studies and journalism, majoring in writing. He was selected to represent South Africa at the World Dance Championships in Germany in the same year, and – as a dancer and choreographer – represented the South African Department of Arts and Culture at the India-Brazil-South Africa Dialogue Forum in India in 2008.He graduated from Faissit Business College in 2010, qualifying as a project manager and performed in the 2010 Fifa World Cup opening and closing ceremonies.In 2011 Modjadji became the first African to win the European Dance Union (ESDU) World Dance Championships for the Jazz Division in Croatia, and in 2012, won the South African Youth Award in arts and entertainment.This year in May he coached 19-year-old Katlego Moela to win the 2013 ESDU Hip Hop World Dance Championship in Croatia.He has also been roped in to choreograph South Africa’s first dance film set to show in 2014 next year.For more information visit his website.last_img read more

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15 Fluid Apps You Can Build for Your Business

first_imgIT + Project Management: A Love Affair Related Posts Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of… Fluid is a simple application for creating site-specific browsers (SSBs) on your OSX desktop. Fluid definitely wasn’t the first SSB project and was inspired primarily by the Mozilla Prism project. The advantage with an SSB is that you can take almost any Web application you use heavily and get it out of your browser, reducing tab usage, avoiding crashes, and generally improving workflow. Fluid is really for anyone, but the low barrier to entry and the effect it has on productivity make it an attractive tool for getting things done. Though it’s been around for a while, few businesses have really taken advantage of its full potential. Fluid supports advanced features such as user scripting, but you don’t need to be a programmer to get some decent apps up and running quickly. All you need to do is give Fluid a URL, a name for your app, a location on your machine, and an icon. That’s it. EmailEspecially for Gmail and Yahoo Mail users, a Fluid app can be the answer to your woes. Programs like Mail and Mozilla Thunderbird are great, but they fail to replicate the true experience that Web-based email programs deliver. It’s super-easy to build and extend an email app in Fluid, and far superior to any of the AIR apps for Gmail or Yahoo. If you don’t have the time to really trick it out, there’s the shareware software Mailplane, which is also built on Fluid but has a few more bells and whistles. Correction: turns out Mailplane isn’t built on Fluid, though it is an SSB.WikiGiving you and your coworkers desktop access to whatever wiki you happen to be using is a definite win. You get the easy access (minus mobile) of something like Evernote, plus the infectious power of wiki linking and collaborative creation. One of the real beauties of using a Fluid app for your wiki experience is that it works with almost any provider, from installations of free software MediaWiki to closed-source hosts like PBworks, Wetpaint, and Wikispaces. DocsGoogle Docs and Zoho Writer are perfectly suited to becoming Fluid apps. Bringing either of them (or whatever online word processor you prefer) to the desktop makes it much more competitive with the experience of Microsoft Office or Open Office. Tasks & To-do ListsA Fluid app works great for any of the software-as-a-service task tracking and to-do list tools, such as Remember The Milk or Ta-da List from 37Signals. File SharingIf you’re a fan of file sharing and syncing software like Dropbox, Box, or Mediafire, then a Fluid app is right up your alley, giving you a much faster way to get to your files. The only top-notch file sharing service that Fluid might not be compatible with is drop.io, since each new drop has its unique URL, though can return to them. RSS ReaderThere are a lot of really great free RSS readers for Mac available. But if you’re an addict of Web-based readers like Google Reader, then Fluid is the perfect way to stick with it but still get desktop access. The optional Cover Flow thumbnail viewer in Fluid can really spice up the feed-reading experience as well. CalendarThis is especially good if you’re seeking to develop a shared calendar for your company. The various solutions for creating a shared calendar with desktop software like iCal are embarrassingly difficult compared to the five minutes it’ll take you to create a Fluid app to access your Google Calendar.Customer ServiceCustomer service mavens, rejoice. Instead of hunting through your many tabs to respond quickly and comprehensively to customers, you can just build a simple Fluid app for Get Satisfaction, Zendesk, or even an OTRS system. BloggingYes, there are definitely some impressive desktop blogging apps, but they’re almost all geared to power bloggers and rip out the familiar interface of WordPress, TypePad, or Tumblr. Taking five minutes to make a Fluid app is a good way to get a fast, free, functioning desktop blogging experience. I should know, since I published this post from a Fluid application. Business IntelligenceDepending on how you’re tracking business intelligence information now, it might be a good idea to create a Fluid app. To create a custom business intelligence dashboard with Fluid might take a little more hacking, but it’s well worth it to get a quick hands-on resource. Project ManagementThere are so many Web-based project management apps out there, it’s impossible to really catalog them all (at least via blog). But what most of them don’t have is a robust desktop version. We use Basecamp here at ReadWriteWeb, and Fluid works great for that or whatever service you might be using. Enterprise MicrobloggingTwitter for the enterprise is a rapidly-evolving category of software. Several of the top options — such as Socialtext Signals, Yammer, and Socialcast — already have good desktop apps. But if you’re seeking one not based on Adobe AIR or something slightly more customizable (without having to work with an API), then Fluid is a good approach to take. Bug TrackingFluid jives with most of the bug and issue tracking software out there, including JIRA, Trac, Bugzilla, and Redmine. Features like Growl notifications and the optional menu bar icon might be especially nice additions to a bug tracker app. Code Repository & ReviewFluid works just fine for accessing heavily used coder resources such as Github. It’s also great for code review and code repository tools like Crucible and FishEye from Atlassian. Social NetworksOf course, Fluid also works really well for anyone doing marketing and customer service work through social networks such as Facebook. Despite the multitude of Twitter apps, it might also be appropriate if you’re using one of the Web-based solutions like CoTweet’s business-focused platform. Further ResourcesThere you have it! As you can probably tell, Fluid works best for the kind of rich Internet applications that you access repeatedly in your workflow, ones that sit in your browser all day and that you come back to again and again. If you’re looking for more ideas or resources, be sure to take a peek at the unofficial Fluid wiki, the site itself, or the Flickr group for free Fluid icons. 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Nowcenter_img Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo… Tags:#enterprise#Products#Trends steven wallinglast_img read more

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Is App Addiction a Real Thing?

first_imgTop Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Tags:#Trends#web sarah perez Do you jokingly refer to yourself as an “app addict?” That is, are you someone so obsessed with your mobile phone applications that you’ve filled numerous screens full of apps, play with them anytime you have 5 minutes to spare and sleep next to your phone just so it can be the first thing you grab in the morning? While there haven’t been any studies yet on the impact of mobile phone application use and health, USA Today recently ran an article practically dubbing “app addiction” a real thing. “What is app addiction doing to people’s health?, the article asked. What indeed?, we wonder. How about nothing at all? Addiction is a Serious Word“Addiction” is a word that’s often tossed around in fun somewhat haphazardly, with people claiming they’re “addicted” to everything from chocolate to TV to shoes. But real addiction is no joking matter. An addict is someone with a psychological or physical dependence to something and are unable to put an end to their behavior despite its negative consequences – behavior which, especially in the case of drug or alcohol addiction, can even lead to death. In more recent years, compulsive behaviors like gambling and online gaming have also fallen under the banner of “addiction” in cases where the behaviors become uncontrollable by the affected person. Given the psychological component of addiction, it’s not entirely off-base to question whether becoming addicted to mobile apps is the next big thing in technology-related addictions, as USA Today is obviously doing. But with no reported cases, no research, and no scholarly articles, it seems a little bit like jumping the gun to claim that app addiction is becoming a health issue. Still, that didn’t stop some experts from weighing in on the matter. Marina Picciotto, professor of psychiatry, neurobiology and pharmacology at Yale University told the paper, “there are a few parallels we can make from other addictions, like compulsive shopping. The consequences can be bad — credit debt, time lost.” And Hilarie Cash, a psychotherapist and co-founder of reStart, a Fall City, Washington-based Internet-addiction recovery center, warned that users should keep tabs on whether apps are taking over their real lives. So how do you know if it’s taking over your life? Cash says that if you spend more than 2 hours per day engaged with your digital equipment for non-work related or homework-related reasons, “then you’ve got cause for alarm.” Wow, if those are the guidelines for addiction then just about every American has television addiction given the 2 hours they sit in front of their TV sets from 8 PM to 10 PM watching primetime programming. Could this Become a Real Problem?That’s not to say that people won’t get addicted to mobile applications at some point, but let’s not start a panic before all the data is in. Most of the self-proclaimed “app addicts” these days are still maintaining a healthy balance between work, life and play and are able to put their phones away when the time is right. Even those who use their mobile phones and related apps regularly aren’t necessarily addicts in the true sense of the word. What do you think? Is “app addiction” a real thing? Or will it become a serious problem in the future? Related Posts center_img Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

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Apple, Google call on California to change self-driving tests

first_imgIT Trends of the Future That Are Worth Paying A… 5 Ways IoT can Help to Reduce Automatic Vehicle… David Curry Related Posts For Self-Driving Systems, Infrastructure and In…center_img Apple, Tesla, Google and Uber have all asked for specific changes to California’s self-driving test policy. The letters come a few weeks before the state’s Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) reviews new regulation proposals.The latest company to receive a self-driving permit, Apple, has called on the DMV to redefine “disengagement” and ensure that reports are clearer. The iPhone maker specifically wants disengagement reports to include situations where the driver had to take over to prevent minor traffic violations. This could include disobeying traffic lights, failing to signal, and failure to yield right-of-way in California.See Also: California legalizes self-driving cars on public roadsApple also wants to reduce the amount of pointless disengagements, like a server error or if on a construction site. It believes that if the changes are implemented, it will lead to more accurate public reporting.Even though Apple has a permit to test self-driving vehicles, it has still yet to clock a mile.Google’s self-driving division, Waymo, which has clocked millions of autonomous miles, has called for automakers to not be held responsible for crashes that aren’t the vehicles fault. In an autonomous world, it is hard to see how the vehicle would not be at fault for a crash, but it could be a move to avoid legal trouble in the future.Both Apple and Tesla have asked for the California DMV to allow the testing of heavier vehicles, according to Reuters. Tesla has already teased a semi-truck as the next car on the roadmap, to be previewed sometime this year. Apple hasn’t teased anything, but the call does suggest it is working on multiple types of vehicle.Uber, which has been at odds with the DMV before over its permit system, called for customers to be allowed into self-driving cars with a human driver onboard. The ride-hailing giant is already testing this service in Pennsylvania and Arizona. Tags:#Apple#automotive#Autonomous#California#cars#DMV#driverless#featured#Google#regulation#Self-Driving#Tesla#top#Uber#Waymo Break the Mold with Real-World Logistics AI and…last_img read more

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