Increased signups for fundraising challenge events

first_img About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tour operator Discover Adventure, organisers of worldwide fundraising challenges for charity groups, has reported a significant increase in recent weeks of individuals signing up on fundraising challenge events: people who are seeing it as high time to do something different and worthwhile with their time off from work. Becoming increasingly deflated with news of the credit crunch, people are turning to challenge events for inspiration and expressing a wish to put their annual leave to a much better use.Discover Adventure has released its new brochure of the increasingly popular Open Challenges. These physically-demanding Challenges take place in all corners of the world as well as in the UK, and are designed for people of everyday backgrounds and fitness levels to take part and raise money for any charity of their choice. At the same time they will gain from an experience overwhelmingly different to a sightseeing-type tour; for many it can trigger a complete change in their lives.Trip participants can choose to support any charity – a national organisation or their local hospice or appeal – by events ranging from trekking up Kilimanjaro to cycling from Lake Titicaca to Machu Picchu in Peru. 30 different challenge ideas are featured in Discover Adventure’s brochure, covering a wide range of activities, destinations and durations. Some events are rather closer to home than you might expect; very popular is the 5-day classic London to Paris Cycle Challenge.Although treks feature widely you need not rely on covering the ground on foot; challenges can take place on two wheels (pedal power), on horse back, on the water and even dog-sledding and other Arctic-based activities.Jo Bradshaw, who manages Discover Adventure’s Open Challenges as well as leading several of the trips each year, is not surprised that in the current economic climate people are searching for something more rewarding to do with their time – particularly if others are going to benefit. She states, “If you feel the time is right to push some personal boundaries, face fears, celebrate a milestone or create a turning point in your life, what better way than giving yourself an unforgettable experience of a lifetime, and doing it for a charity. It certainly is a Win, Win Situation.”For further information or alternative photos please contact:Kathryn Furnell, Marketing ManagerDirect Tel: 01722 719021Email: [email protected] Adventure, Throope Down House, Coombe Bissett, Salisbury, Wiltshire SP5 4LNMain office Tel: 01722 718444 ; Fax: 01722 718445;Email: [email protected] Web: www.discoveradventure.comNotes to EditorsDiscover Adventure has been designing and operating challenging events for over 14 years, and is proud of its very high level of repeat business with both large and small charities. We are committed to running safe but enjoyable challenges all over the world and here in the UK, whether trekking or cycling, horse-trekking or multi-activity. We are committed to providing a high quality service with experienced, professional leadership and flexible office support at competitive prices, and do not comprise on safety.We can tailor-make itineraries for Charities or individuals can choose from over fifty tried and tested challenges. Charities can also opt for our highly successful Open Challenges, where there is no need to recruit a minimum number of supporters.Discover Adventure is fully ATOL bonded and a member of AITO.  16 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 10 November 2008 | News Tagged with: Events Increased signups for fundraising challenge eventslast_img read more

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Holly Bowling Shares Pro-Shot Video Of Phish’s “Mercury” Rendition From Denver [Watch]

first_imgHolly Bowling played a soldout show this past Thursday at Denver’s Bluebird Theater, ahead of Phish’s three-night run of shows at Dick’s Sporting Goods Park in nearby Commerce City, Colorado. Intertwining Phish and Grateful Dead songs, Bowling brought the heat all night, getting the Denver crowd hyped up for a weekend of music that undoubtedly delivered and made up for the “Curveball blues”.Bowling opened up the show with a deep rendition of Phish’s “Colonel Forbin’s Ascent”, before immediately throwing in some Grateful Dead, transitioning into “Bird Song”. Up next was Phish’s ” The Horse”> “Silent In The Morning” segue, leading way to “The Lizards”, with Holly tickling the ivories and covering the bases of all four Phish masterminds’ instruments on the piano. “The Lizards” led to the Grateful Dead’s “Help On The Way”> “Slipknot!”, before Bowling brought things full circle and ended the first set with “Fly Famous Mockingbird”, bringing closure to “Colonel Forbin’s Ascent” that she opened the show with.After a brief set break, Holly came back out and opened second set with a 22-minute rendition of the psychedelic “Cryptical Envelopment” > “The Other One”, before working her way into the Phish instrumental “Bliss”, which appeared on 1996’s Billy Breaths. A highlight of the evening was Bowling’s playful rendition of “Mercury” which came next, before hopping back into “The Other One” > “Cryptical Envelopment”. Staying with the Dead theme, “Stella Blue” was next, before Bowling brought set two to a close with the badass pairing of “Sand” > “Slipknot!” > “Franklin’s Tower”. Phish’s instrumental “Cars Trucks Buses” served as the evening’s encore, getting Phish fans in the area extra excited to see three nights of their favorite band over Labor Day Weekend.Luckily for fans, Holly Bowling has shared pro-shot video footage of the evening’s “Mercury”. Watch the video below.Holly Bowling – “Mercury” – 8/30/2018[Video: Holly Bowling]You can also listen to full show audio below, courtesy of taper Jeffery Bowling.Holly Bowling  – Bluebird Theater  – 8/30/2018[Audio: Jeffery Bowling]Next up for Holly is a week full of shows, starting tomorrow at Charleston, SC’s Pour House, before heading to Atlanta, GA’s City Winery Thursday, September 6th. Friday evening, Bowling heads back north to Charlotte, NC’s McGlohon Theater followed by a show Saturday, September 8th, at Asheville, NC’s Isis Music. Continuing north, Bowling will play this Sunday, September 8th, at Washington D.C.’s Hamilton. For a full list of Holly Bowling’s upcoming tour dates and tickets to her shows, head to her website.Setlist: Holly Bowling | Bluebird Theater | Denver, CO | 8/30/2018Set One: Colonel Forbin’s Ascent > Bird Song, The Horse > Silent In The Morning, The Lizards, Help On The Way > Slipknot! > Fly Famous MockingbirdSet Two: Cryptical Envelopment > The Other One > Bliss > Mercury > The Other One > Cryptical Envelopment > Stella Blue, Sand > Slipknot! > Franklin’s TowerEncore: Cars Trucks Buseslast_img read more

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A new take on Title IX

first_imgGAZETTE: What are some of the other major changes you and your colleagues have worked hard to implement over the summer?MERHILL: One that a lot of individuals are concerned with is the new requirement that colleges and universities provide live hearings when instances of sexual misconduct are reported. Advisers for both parties must be allowed to engage in cross-examination of the parties, witnesses, and advisers during these hearings. This marks a very big change. There were a lot of questions to consider — how do you protect the privacy, and safety, of the parties involved under this new model? Who is going to preside over these hearings — will they be University officials or representatives from outside the University? We’re already at work on building a space for these hearings in the Smith Campus Center that will be designed to preserve the safety and privacy of community members involved in the filing of a complaint of misconduct.GAZETTE: The DOE has also changed the standard of evidence that can be used in investigations of sexual misconduct, has it not?MERHILL: Yes. Previous federal guidance mandated that colleges and universities use a “preponderance of the evidence” standard in determining responsibility during the investigation of formal complaints involving sexual harassment and assault. The new Title IX regulations afford institutions the flexibility to choose either a “preponderance of the evidence” or “clear and convincing” standard. In short, “clear and convincing” requires a higher burden of proof.During our conversations with academic leadership, students, faculty, and staff this summer, the overwhelming response was for us to maintain the “preponderance of the evidence” standard in our procedures for formal complaints of sexual harassment and misconduct, and this is what we are going to do.GAZETTE: What are some of the other prevailing decision points that community members helped you navigate over the summer?MERHILL: Let me reiterate just how appreciative I am for all of the thoughtfulness, care, and patience of all of those who have worked with us over the previous few months. There have been many. One example which I already briefly touched upon has to do with identifying who should serve as the decision-maker in a live hearing. Would we have a single hearing decision-maker or multiple ones, would it be made up of individuals internal to the University, or persons external?What we heard from people is that it would be beneficial to have some internal individuals who are familiar with the culture and structures at Harvard, along with some external to Harvard. We also heard pretty much unanimously from community members that we should have a panel as opposed to a single decision-maker. Based on this input, Harvard will adopt a hybrid panel of two individuals from a list of trained administrators and faculty, and one person from a list of external attorneys.Another point of decision-making was around the responsible-employee model. Prior to the new rules, and according to Harvard policy, any staff or faculty member who receives notice of harassment, meaning either if someone actually comes to them with a concern, or they’re aware of a potential concern within their community more broadly, is required to share that concern with either a Title IX resource within their School or unit, or with the University Title IX Office. The new Title IX regulations no longer follow the responsible-employee model, and instead identify a much smaller group of individuals as responsible for sharing concerns with Title IX. In meeting with community members throughout this summer we heard, again overwhelmingly, that community members want Harvard to keep this model in place. Again, based on this feedback, the responsible-employee model will remain across both of our new policies.GAZETTE: What can community members do if they’d like to learn more about, or offer input regarding, the interim policies over the coming year?MERHILL: It’s important that everyone at Harvard knows that all existing Title IX resources, including those related to training and support, reporting, and investigations, remain in place, even during the difficult times of this pandemic. School and unit Title IX Resource Coordinators remain the primary points of contact for students, staff, and faculty, including for the provision of supportive measures. Title IX trainings, including bystander-intervention training, trainings around gender inclusivity and other topics, continue to happen, along with updates on what is changing with Title IX rules and in the world. An example: Updates to training modules actually now also include an example of harassment on Zoom. We have new prevention initiatives online that individuals can access via our website. Anonymous online reporting still exists. And ODR continues to be able to receive, and investigate, formal complaints — they have long been able to do so, and had remote processes in place long before the spread of the coronavirus.I’d encourage everyone to read our At-a-Glance document for a quick overview of the changes to Harvard’s policies and procedures on sexual harassment and misconduct. As President [Larry] Bacow has said in the past, all of us at Harvard have a role to play in ensuring that each of us who calls this University home feels welcome, and safe. We’re grateful for the opportunity to engage with so many caring and thoughtful individuals across Harvard’s Schools and units. Today, new U.S. Department of Education (DOE) rules on Title IX, the law that prohibits sex discrimination in schools that receive federal funds, took effect. In order to comply with the new federal regulations, Harvard has implemented interim policies and procedures. The Gazette spoke with Title IX coordinator Nicole Merhill to discuss what has changed and how the University was able to implement these changes in the very short timeline set forth by the DOE, with the input of community members across Harvard.Q&ANicole MerhillGAZETTE: Would you provide some of the context around the U.S. Department of Education’s decision to issue new Title IX rules?MERHILL: In November of 2018, the DOE published proposed amendments to the Title IX regulations, specifically as applied to sexual harassment, including sexual assault and sexual violence, at elementary, secondary, and post-secondary institutions.Consistent with the rule-making process, individuals were invited to comment on the proposed regulations. Ultimately, the department received over 120,000 comments, which they were then required to review and consider. This process took over a year and a half and resulted in approximately 2,000 pages of preamble to the final rules themselves, where the department responded to the comments and concerns that were raised during this comment period. The final Title IX regulations, published in May 2020, go into effect Aug. 14, 2020, which means all Title IX policies and procedures must be updated to reflect the new regulations by Aug. 14, 2020. Which brings us to today.GAZETTE:  That sounds like a quick timeline for implementation.MERHILL: It is. The DOE gave 70 working days to read and understand a document with more than 2,000 pages and then to implement changes corresponding to that document. By comparison, in October 2014, the DOE published the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) amendments to the Clery Act, and afforded institutions nearly nine months (until July 2015) to make changes to ensure compliance with the new amendments. That’s a big difference to begin with and the changes to the Title IX regulations are far more expansive than those included in the VAWA amendments. And now, we find ourselves in the midst of a pandemic, with the vast majority of our community members in remote settings, which makes it even more challenging. Of course, we deeply value the input of Harvard’s students, faculty, and staff, and without it, it would be next to impossible to navigate the critical decisions we’ve been forced to make with regard to changing our rules and regulations on Title IX.GAZETTE:  Yet here we are. Our new Title IX policies and procedures must take effect today, according to federal law. How was the University able to put together these new rules and regulations with all of these hurdles in place?MERHILL: First and foremost, I am grateful that so many community members did engage in this process this summer, despite the fact that we are all doing our best to navigate the current pandemic, and living and working in towns and cities all over the world. Over the past few months, my team has engaged a diverse set of groups across Harvard, including with students and staff from our Title IX liaison working groups, staff members from the Office of Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (OSAPR), response peer counselors, care peer educators, and members of Our Harvard Can Do Better (OHCDB). We’ve met virtually with the co-presidents of the Undergraduate Council, and with individual students, staff, and faculty members, all of whom provided key input on decision points related to the new requirements set forth by the DOE, and how we could best implement them here at Harvard. There were meetings with individual deans as well as discussions at the Provost’s Council to assure that the viewpoints of many constituencies were represented.As a preliminary matter, everyone agreed that in light of the challenging timeline, current circumstances, and the importance of these decisions, these policies and procedures should be interim ones. We knew that we must all work together to ensure that they protect the safety of everyone within Harvard’s community, while providing fair processes for the parties involved when instances of sexual harassment or misconduct occur. Over the next 12 months, we will incorporate the experiences and perspectives of community members into closely examining the interim policies and procedures, while making modifications as appropriate to meet the needs of the community and ensuring compliance with the law.Harvard will enact two interim policies: The first — Harvard University Interim Title IX Sexual Harassment Policy — was developed in response to the recent changes to the Title IX regulations, issued by the Department of Education on May 6 of 2020. The second — Harvard University Interim Other Sexual Misconduct Policy — will address misconduct that falls outside the jurisdiction of the first and was previously addressed under the University’s Sexual and Gender-Based Harassment Policy.Why do this? Because Harvard remains committed to going beyond the minimum requirements stipulated by the new Title IX regulations and to addressing the same types of conduct we addressed prior to the DOE’s changes.GAZETTE:  I think you’re beginning to get at one of the major changes required by the DOE, which relates to how sexual harassment is defined according to Title IX, and how Harvard has decided to address this change.MERHILL: That’s right. Under the new regulations, sexual harassment is defined as conduct that is so severe, pervasive, and objectively offensive that it effectively denies a person equal access to the University’s education, work programs, or activities. The new definition does include quid pro quo harassment, which was included in the prior rules, as well as four new categories of conduct now considered per se sexual harassment. These include sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking. The alleged conduct must happen against a person in the United States on University property or in connection with a University program or activity. The new Title IX regulations require that we dismiss those matters that do not meet this definition but they do allow schools to address the allegations under other misconduct policies within the institutions themselves.This is a substantial shift from the old definition of sexual harassment as unwelcome conduct that is severe, persistent, or pervasive: concerns have been raised about the use of the conjunctive “and” in the new definition instead of the disjunctive “or” in the old definition, as being more restrictive. Additionally, the old regulations did not require the conduct to take place in the United States and did not include the prescriptive requirement of dismissal, which allowed institutions to go beyond the minimum regulatory requirements.Many students have raised concerns about the new definition of sexual harassment, in particular as it relates to conduct during study-abroad programs or as part of field sites. Taking into consideration the feedback from the community, we decided it was essential to adopt a second policy — the Other Sexual Misconduct Policy — to address conduct no longer addressed under the new Title IX regulations, including but not limited to conduct that takes place outside of the United States. “Harvard remains committed to going beyond the minimum requirements stipulated by the new Title IX regulations and to addressing the same types of conduct we addressed prior to the DOE’s changes.” The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news.last_img read more

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