Extending Foreclosure Protections for Homeowners

first_img Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Previous: The Ongoing Struggle of Pending Home Sales Next: Financial Services Law Firms Navigate Modern Challenges Foreclosure Mediation Residential Mortgage Foreclosure Act Rhode Island Senate Bill 2270 2018-06-27 David Wharton in Daily Dose, Featured, Foreclosure, Government, Journal, News, Servicing Home / Daily Dose / Extending Foreclosure Protections for Homeowners The Rhode Island legislature has voted to extend the sunset provision on the state’s Residential Mortgage Foreclosure Act, which mandates “good-faith effort” mediation between lenders and homeowners facing foreclosure before that foreclosure can go forward.The Act, which was originally passed in 2013, was due to expire on July 1 due to its original sunset clause. It requires the lender and homeowner “to deal honestly and fairly with the mediation coordinator with an intent to determine whether an alternative to foreclosure is economically feasible.” The mediator must a member of a HUD-approved counseling agency and is required to serve as an “unbiased, impartial and independent coordinator” between the lender and homeowner.Rhode Island Senate Bill 2270 shifts the sunset clause of the Act back to July 1, 2023, extending it by another five years. A companion bill, House Bill 7385, would have removed the sunset clause entirely, but it stalled along the way. Senate Bill 2270 is now headed for the desk of Rhode Island Gov. Gina Raimondo. Why was there a sunset clause on the original bill in the first place? According to The Jamestown Press, optimism. The Jamestown Press reports that “The sunset clause was added because legislators hoped the economy would bounce back stronger by now. The Jamestown resolution, however, says ‘while foreclosure rates have improved since the depths of economic crisis, the percentage of Rhode Islanders facing foreclosure today is still four times higher than pre-crisis rates.’”The AP reports that nearly 1,000 homeowners have sought mediation since 2013. Furthermore, Rhode Island Housing—the organization that administers the state program—more than 70 percent of the homeowners who have participated in the mediation program have come to terms with the lenders and were able to remain in their homes.According to The Jamestown Press, “Before the law took effect, Rhode Island had one of the least restrictive foreclosure procedures in the country. Lenders merely were required to provide notice to the homeowner of their intent to initiate foreclosure. They also had to post public notice of the foreclosure in a newspaper. There was no required court involvement and no requirement that lenders meet with borrowers to explore alternatives to foreclosure.”The housing crisis a decade ago saw nearly 10,000 Rhode Island homes go into foreclosure. Had the Residential Mortgage Foreclosure Act been allowed to expire, Rhode Island would have once again joined the handful of states that do not require a judicial or mediation process prior to foreclosure. In written testimony to the state’s Senate Judiciary Committee, Rhode Island attorney Michael Zabin put it succinctly, saying that if the mediation requirement had been allowed to lapse, “we would be back to the wild, wild West that existed before the statue.” Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Extending Foreclosure Protections for Homeowners June 27, 2018 2,973 Views Share Save The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Related Articles Tagged with: Foreclosure Mediation Residential Mortgage Foreclosure Act Rhode Island Senate Bill 2270center_img  Print This Post Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago David Wharton, Managing Editor at the Five Star Institute, is a graduate of the University of Texas at Arlington, where he received his B.A. in English and minored in Journalism. Wharton has over 16 years’ experience in journalism and previously worked at Thomson Reuters, a multinational mass media and information firm, as Associate Content Editor, focusing on producing media content related to tax and accounting principles and government rules and regulations for accounting professionals. Wharton has an extensive and diversified portfolio of freelance material, with published contributions in both online and print media publications. Wharton and his family currently reside in Arlington, Texas. He can be reached at [email protected] Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago About Author: David Wharton Sign up for DS News Daily Subscribelast_img read more

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No. 2 Syracuse’s man-up unit, 2nd-best in the nation, falls short in season-ending loss

first_img Published on May 21, 2017 at 5:28 pm Contact Charlie: [email protected] | @charliedisturco Facebook Twitter Google+ NEWARK, Del. — The second-best man-up offense in the nation failed to convert on all four opportunities in its most important game of the season.Syracuse alley dodges were stonewalled by defenders. Slide gaps didn’t create any open room for shots. The Orange passed around the packed-in Towson defense, probing for opportunities that seemed not to be there. When SU did find enough room for a quick pass or outside shot, goalie Matt Hoy was there for the stop.No. 2 Syracuse’s (13-3, 4-0 Atlantic Coast) reliable man-up unit went AWOL on Sunday afternoon in its 10-7, season-ending loss to No. 11 Towson (12-4, 4-1 Colonial Athletic) in the NCAA quarterfinals at Delaware Stadium in Newark, Delaware. The 0-for-4 performance is SU’s worst all season and just the third time without a single man-up goal this year. The struggles were due, in large part, to Hoy’s 12-save performance in net.“To have a good man down,” Towson head coach Shawn Nadelen said, “you need a goalie to make saves, step up and be a little showstopper.”Entering Sunday’s matchup, SU converted on 54.8 percent of its man-up opportunities, second only behind Johns Hopkins. The only other times man-down units blanked the Orange was against St. John’s (0-for-2) and Binghamton (0-for-1). This was the same extra-man offense that hung five goals against Hobart and three on both Army and North Carolina.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe first Syracuse man-up came just over three minutes into the first quarter. Twenty-one seconds later, Nick Mariano unleashed a shot from far out. Hoy saw the ball and made the stop, starting a Towson transition.“That first quarter, Mariano had that shot I saved,” Hoy said. “That put me in the zone for the rest of the game. That gave me confidence against their best shooter right from the get-go.”Towson’s defense crowded in the middle of the field and often TU flooded the crease, stopping any off-ball movement in that area, where Brendan Bomberry and Nate Solomon thrive.Hoy hadn’t been Towson’s starter at the beginning of the season, Nadelen instead favoring junior Josh Miller. But Hoy forced a rotation and midway through April, against Delaware on the same field as Sunday’s NCAA quarterfinals, Hoy won the job outright. Since, Towson has not allowed double-digit goals. That included Sunday, when the Tigers defense limited Syracuse to its fewest goals all season.“(Hoy) really saw the ball well,” Solomon said. “He stopped me on a good shot from like five yards out. … From outside and inside. He’s just a very good goaltender.”Instead of conceding sweeps toward the middle of the field, the TU forced Syracuse to dodge down the alley. When SU would try to cut toward the middle of field, multiple Towson defenders converged on the player. The Syracuse offense that had thrived in the middle of the field had to adapt, even while 6-on-5. Shots from farther out ensued, and many ended up high and wide — or in the webbing of Hoy’s stick.Twice, Syracuse forced its way inside near the crease while man-up. Both times, Brad Voigt caught a pass before shooting 1-on-1 against Hoy. Both times, the senior goalie made the save and killed off the penalty.As the fourth quarter wound down, Syracuse made a quick run. Solomon scored three goals in a row and the offense began to push transition on Towson turnovers. But the harder Syracuse pushed, the more comfortable Towson became. Stopping the wave of man-ups put Hoy “in the zone,” he said. Hoy made 12 saves total.“Our credit really goes to their goaltender more than their man-down defense,” SU head coach John Desko said. “He got in front of the ball, and maybe our placement was a little off, but those are 5- and 6-yard saves.”Aside from a Solomon behind-the-back goal and transition goals late in the fourth quarter, Hoy rarely faltered. Syracuse went scoreless the entire first quarter. The second and third, SU had just three to its name. Hoy had nine saves in those frames alone.Only seven of Syracuse’s 31 shots found the back of the net. The last time SU had scored just seven goals came in the NCAA quarterfinals the year before against Maryland. Last year, Kyle Bernlohr made 15 saves and was the brick wall in net that held SU to just 1-of-5 on its man-up opportunities. This year, it was Matt Hoy that shined.“I just can’t explain it,” Hoy said. “You get in a zone as a goalie. It’s like I didn’t even see the ball, I just went.“I knew where they were going to shoot the ball.” Commentslast_img read more

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City council discusses state of hospital and which roads to repair first

first_imgby James Jordan, Sumner Newscow — Sumner Regional Medical Center board chairman Terry Deschaine told the Wellington City Council Tuesday the hospital is doing some better, but it is still struggling. He noted that a study released last week that listed 31 rural hospitals in Kansas are in danger of closing. While the study intentionally did not list the hospitals publicly, Deschaine said Wellington would be on that list. But he also cited progress made and is still hopefull.He said many rural hospitals in states that are blocking the expansion of Medicaid are struggling. If it were expanded under the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare), the hospital would be getting between $600,000 and $750,000 more just in Wellington.He said the state hospital association is pushing a bill that would expand Medicaid, similar to one in Indiana that also has a Republican controlled legislature.“It answers the objections of our governor to expansion of Medicaid, and we will see what happens” he told the council.The hospital ended the year by losing $71,000 on paper in December, but that was partially due to some big expenses. Apart from those special items the hospital would have been in the black by about $140,000.Still they felt they did turn a profit in January but he did not have exact figures.They are budgeting a profit for the coming year, after having ended 2015 on a down note.After they lost their surgeon a few months ago, they found surgeons in Wichita that would come down and do procedures. He said that has gone well and one of them is going to start coming down weekly.“We are still at risk, but we are moving in the right direction,” Deschaine told the council.In other matters:•The Wellington City Commission agreed to sell a lot at 814 Settlers Circle in the Settlers Cove area. A question was raised about the intent of the person buying the lot. The motion to approve added the caveat that all city ordinances and zoning restrictions must be followed just in case.•The Council voted to transfer $35,000 from the general fund to the capital improvement fund for streets. The money had been budgeted for street repairs but was not used because they were having a study done on the streets. City officials felt transferring it would be better as they continue to examine the study and plan for future street repairs.While no direction was given on exactly how to use the money, council member Kip Etter wondered if it might be a good idea to use it on Ninth Street, leading to the school sports facilities. He said a lot of people use those streets when the come to town for games and it would be a good way for the city to make a positive impression.Streets supervisor Jeremy Jones said they would continue to study which streets to work on. The study that was done suggests at times working on streets that are not in too bad of condition to keep them from deteriorating, as opposed to just fixing the worst ones first. That would keep the ones that are OK from getting worse. That might also be an option down the road.The city has budgeted $120,000 for streets for the year.Council member Jan Korte said since the city paid for the study, it should follow the study’s recommendations.They did vote to transfer the money, but made no decisions regarding which streets to repair, which will come later.•The council gave initial approval to the purchase of $4.8 million in utility revenue bonds for the water and sewer systems. Financial advisor John Haas showed them bids from various institutions. He recommended going with the second lowest bidder because of time constraints, and felt the conditions of the market would make the one that was slightly higher a better deal in the long run. He feels they can get better ratings if they act quickly. He will return in March with a final proposal for the council to vote on.•The council approved changes to the city’s agreement with the Kansas Power Pool which changed how many votes it takes in the pool to pass a measure. It had taken unanimous approval, but now only two thirds of the cities have to agree in order to made a move of any kind.•The city approved the purchase of  Variable Frequency Drives for the water plant at a cost of $95,000. The city had budgeted $115,000 for the purchase, so they were happy to get a lower bid than expected. This should make the water system more secure and reduce the number of main breaks the city has.•The City also approved a financial agreement with CornerBank for the purchase of a sprinkler system for the golf course. The council approved the purchase itself at its last meeting. CornerBank will lend the money to the city at 2.6 percent interest. The city had the option of making monthly or yearly payments. They decided to go with the monthly option to save $3,000. If they had went with the yearly option they would not have had a payment due until 2017. The measure passed 4-1 with Jim Valentine voting no.•The city approved the purchase of an air conditioner for the east side of the administration building for $18,400.•The council agreed to “charge off” unpaid utility bills totalling $58,000. This is more a bookkeeping matter, getting unpaid bills off the regular books. The city sends out $8 million in bills each year, so the percentage is low. The city also participates in a state program that will take money from state income tax refunds when those people owe utility bills, so the city could get some of the money back.•The Council scheduled a work session for 5:30 p.m. March 7 at city hall, to talk about yards and code enforcement, and the animal shelter. Council member Kelly Green said she wanted to talk with code enforcement people and others involved with enforcing city rules about yards. She said she has pictures from five years ago from various yards, and many of them are still in the same bad shape they were then.“I am running out of reasons. I want to see where the broken link is,” she said.Follow us on Twitter. Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments (11) Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings Sort by: Date Rating Last Activity Loading comments… You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. +10 Vote up Vote down notlla · 234 weeks ago Council members and Kip Etter need to take a look at the streets ,south of the BNFS tracks, While they are down there, they might take a look at the crossings on H st and G street,they are ridicules. The BNFS took out all the asfolt , and filled it back in with big chunks of rock and rail spikes. Did the so called street inspectors even go south of the tracks????????????????? Report Reply 0 replies · active 234 weeks ago +1 Vote up Vote down jason · 234 weeks ago So why is wellington paying someone 4.8 million dollars to upgrade the water and sewer, doesn’t wellington have a crew that does this. Shouldn’t they be doing the work and saving tax payers money. Just wondering cause you see so many city employees driving around or standing around doing nothing. If they don’t do this kind of work, maybe they need to thin the crew out so there not wasting tax payers money. Report Reply 0 replies · active 233 weeks ago +5 Vote up Vote down Turkeyleg · 234 weeks ago Just how many months are the taxpayers of Wellington going to make to the bank for the sprinkler loan? Then is there a payoff clause in the loan if the city leaders decide to pay off the loan early? Report Reply 0 replies · active 234 weeks ago -4 Vote up Vote down Zach · 234 weeks ago Wgtn. has 30% of the pop. paying 70% of the taxes and the 30% that pays very little or no taxes complains the most and needs all the public services- hospital, ebt, free and reduced lunches, ambulance. All the while voting Republican, smoking and neglecting bills. Report Reply 1 reply · active 234 weeks ago +5 Vote up Vote down Jim · 234 weeks ago H street is taking on the looks of a road being deserted for a quiet zone. I sure as hell hope not Report Reply 0 replies · active 234 weeks ago +6 Vote up Vote down Thirsty · 234 weeks ago My god I am tired of listening to people whine and complain when the city makes decisions to fix things. You guys are the same people who whine when they don’t fix things. Just because they choose 1 out of 200 projects to fix and that one isn’t the project you think is important you all come unglued and act like its costing the tax payers an arm and a leg when really you aren’t paying any more than normal. These are budgetary allocated capital improvement investments. Every civilized population has them. Why not generate money other ways for these projects and tackle other problems at the same time? Impossible you say? No says I! Meth is an epidemic in Wellington and has been for some time. Police pay more attention to seat belt violations than tackling obvious meth users. Can a municipality or county not vote to locally increase the punishment for possession or distribution or meth? I would think a law could be passed or ordinance initiated to make it much like a DUI. Here is my idea though. Instead of just handing out months or years you hand out labor dollars. Oh you are busted with that drug? That is $10,000 labor you owe ($2,000 of which goes into a fund for the inmate for release so they can stay on track) and get paid $2.50 an hour to rebuild our streets and structures that need attention. Imagine the work that can be done while teaching discipline and lessons learned. You can’t take the substance out of the town because for every guy you bust 2 more take their place. You have to take the desire to continue using the substance out of the people. I am quite confident my idea would work. Couple that with increased substance abuse treatment provided to offenders I think you may be able to not only save a lot of lives but teach labor skills, discipline and get projects done for pennies on the dollar compared to the labor you say drives around all day and does nothing. Just a thought! Report Reply 4 replies · active 233 weeks ago Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new commentslast_img read more

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