Harvard Gazette’s top stories of 2018

first_imgFollow Harvard on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram to see more great moments from the past year. Milestones, innovation, analysis, and inspiration from the University and beyond Harvard Gazette’s top stories of 2017 Related The Year in PicturesThese were the stories that were too big for just words“The center in the crossroads”Students and staff embraced Harvard’s new Smith Campus Center.,“The ending as beginning: Commencement ‘18”There were cheers and tears at the 367th Commencement ceremony.,“Beauty in the eye of the microscope”by Rachel TraughberNew tools helped Harvard researchers display the world in unexpected and compelling ways.,“Playing The Game, both past and present”by Jon ChaseThe celebration transcended generations when Harvard beat Yale at Fenway Park.,“Catching up with the class of ‘48”by Jon ChaseA wonderful look at the lives of alumni at 90 and beyond.,Deep DivesThese were the in-depth stories that our readers couldn’t put down“‘What the hell — why don’t I just go to Harvard and turn my life upside down?’”by Colleen WalshPart of the Experience series, then-President Drew Faust opened up about family, history, and the illness that urged her forward.,“Onward and upward, robots”by Alvin PowellFirst in a series on cutting-edge research at Harvard, researchers showed off the unique approaches they are taking with robotics.,“‘The greatest gift you can have is a good education, one that isn’t strictly professional’”by Liz MineoHoward Gardner talked about his secret to a successful career and a happy life.“A summer of service to cities”by Christina PazzaneseThe Bloomberg Harvard City Leadership Initiative is working to help city officials be more effective and train the next generation.,“‘To be horrified by inequality and early death and not have any kind of plan for responding — that would not work for me’”by Alvin PowellPaul Farmer talked about making impoverished lives his life work.,Social MediaThese were the stories that we had to sharecenter_img As a new year approaches, we look back at some of the Gazette’s most-read and best-loved stories of 2018.Campus LifeThese were the stories that made us laugh, cry, and connect to each other“Facing the future, Lewis and Faust see reason for hope”by Alvin PowellIn a time of uncertainty, Congressman Lewis and then-President Faust urged the graduating class to rise to the challenge of a world in need of leadership.,“Harvard names Lawrence S. Bacow as 29th president”After an extensive search supported by faculty, students, staff, and alumni, Harvard welcomed its 29th president.,“Not just a humanities cat”by Rose LincolnAfter four years at Harvard, Remy the cat has had pretty much the full Harvard experience.,“It’s Housing Day, with snowballs”by Aaron GoldmanFirst-year students battled the snow to learn where they’d live next.,“When her life is over, she’ll have lived”by Jill RadskenHarvard senior Elsie Tellier uses courage, strength, sadness, and compassion to respond to her lethal disease.,“Spreading the word on college admissions”by Liz MineoHarvard students developed a college admissions guide to help others traverse the competitive path.“Bringing a dying language back to life”by Brigid O’RourkeThrough Harvard’s Project Teach program, an instructor is teaching seventh-graders the origin of the Gullah language.,“Mourning Devah Pager”by Jill RadskenHarvard mourned the loss of Devah Pager, an academic “force of nature,” remembered for her trailblazing scholarship and extraordinary mentorship.,From the LabThese were the stories that explored the world around us and the mysteries within us“When science meets mindfulness”by Alvin PowellThe first in a series that looked at the expanding research on mindfulness and stress.,“How fast can we run?”by Alvin PowellThe chair of the Department of Human Evolutionary Biology discussed the body’s triumphs and limits.“Microbes by the mile”by Deborah BlackwellHarvard researchers shared the beauty of the microscopic world.,“Five healthy habits to live by”by Karen FeldscherHarvard Chan researchers looked at over 25 years of data to get a better idea of which habits are the healthiest.,“Songs in the key of humanity”by Peter ReuellA Harvard study questioned whether music is more universal than we previously thought.,The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. Top stories of 2016 Looking back at some of our most-read articles of the yearlast_img read more

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Trinidad and Tobago Fosters Gender Integration in the Military

first_imgBy Geraldine Cook/Diálogo March 08, 2019 The Trinidad and Tobago Defence Force (TTDF) integrated women into its ranks for the first time on July 1, 1980. Since then, the military organization promotes gender diversity through integration, education and a focus on equity. “To be a woman in TTDF means that we have an opportunity to make a difference,” said Trinidad and Tobago Regiment Major Jozette McLean, the first female commander of the Support and Service Battalion and the first female commandant of the battalion’s Army Learning Center, to Diálogo. “We’ve shown we can stand toe-to-toe with the men; we’ve also shown that despite having to embrace the traditional roles of women, we are still able to transition into military professionals and keep pace with everything.” After 23 years in the military, Maj. McLean feels TTDF gave her the same opportunities as her male counterparts. “TTDF allows women —once they meet the standards— to be employed in any job,” she said. “It’s even better now, because we have female commanders, females at the highest levels making a lot of decisions. We’re fully integrated.” Women in TTDF compromise 13.60 percent of the troops. Of those, 7 percent are female officers and 93 percent are enlisted. They have progressed from administrative and support roles, such as cooks, to pilots, ship captains, and other high-ranking positions. “There are no barriers for women in regard to their contribution in any area or specialization they may choose,” said TTDF Rear Admiral Hayden Pritchard, chief of Defense Staff “I have seen the effectiveness of an organization that has removed barriers to the participation of women. It’s more useful and effective to utilize the talents and energies of all elements of the military in an integrated way.” Making a difference Trinidad and Tobago Coast Guard Lieutenant Commander Kele-Ann Bourne, in charge of logistics, training, and medical services administration, remembers one of her first challenges as a new soldier in 2002. “I didn’t fit right in the uniform. A lot of the uniforms back then were not tailored or custom made for women, but it didn’t matter,” she said. “I just wanted to make sure I was achieving our objectives.” TTDF made organizational and logistics adjustments to uniforms, accommodations, policies, and procedures to better integrate women in the military. “The main benefit of being here is to serve our country and be able to see the men and women developing under our command […]”, said Lt. Cmdr. Bourne. “You have subordinates that look up to you, and you’re to provide guidance and mentorship that a lot of them don’t have in their homes,” she said. For Trinidad and Tobago Regiment Warrant Officer Class 1 Nadine Pompey, command sergeant major, being a soldier is rewarding. “As a female soldier, we have to be willing and able to perform not as a female, but as a soldier,” she said. “Even though we are women in traditional roles —being mothers and so forth—, we are expected to stand alongside with our counterparts, our brother soldiers, to perform as they do, and even better.” WO Pompey joined TTDF in 1992. “The biggest challenge for women in the military is to balance work and family life. Sometimes it’s challenging for a woman to continue to play the traditional role and be a leader within the organization,” she said. “However, I think that within everything we do, we have done quite well.” Twenty-seven years later, she has no regrets and is convinced she made the right choice. “We were very small in numbers then. I was a clerk. From then to now, women have grown tremendously in terms of what we do,” said WO Pompey. “We have continued to strive, to achieve alongside with our male counterparts, and to grow as a part of TTDF.”last_img read more

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