Mining firm BHP says its Australian, Chilean power tenders could be a ‘game changer’

first_imgMining firm BHP says its Australian, Chilean power tenders could be a ‘game changer’ FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Renew Economy:Mining giant BHP has put its electricity contracts for its operations on Australia’s main grid and in Chile out to tender, and expects that offers including renewable energy could present the cheapest and most efficient options.BHP consumes about 6 terawatt-hours in Chile, around seven per cent of that country’s annual electricity demand, and it has a 300MW requirement for the operations on Australia’s National Electricity Market, including for the power-hungry operations at Olympic Dam in South Australia.“We are in market in both Chile and Australia for significant amounts of energy,” the head of low emissions technology at BHP, Kirsten Rose, said at the Energy and Mines conference in Perth this week.“The ability to use BHP’s purchasing power in this way is significant…these are technology agnostic tenders by the way, but we encourage innovation and to bring value to the table. We are really interested to see what happens, but we fully expect there will be a significant renewable component to that…and that for us could be game changing.”Recent tenders held by corporates and utilities have underlined the cheaper cost of wind and solar, including the cost of “firming” to ensure consistent supply.Rose says the BHP tender would evaluate cost, reliability and emissions, but she notes that for the first time BHP is putting a strong emphasis on the carbon content of its electricity supply contracts. “We are certainly turning the evaluation on its head from what we have done in the past.”More: BHP energy tender could deliver “game changing” shift to renewableslast_img read more

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What sort of strange lottery determines that one baby is celebrated while others are aborted?

first_imgStuff co.nz 1 November 2018Family First Comment: A superb article from Karl du Fresne – so many great statements that it’s hard to highlight the best one!“Alison Mau proposed during a radio debate that men be required to get permission from certifying consultants before getting prostate checks, as women seeking an abortion have to do. Journalist Alison Mau gave an early example of the fatuous arguments likely to be deployed when, in a one-sided panel discussion on Radio New Zealand, she proposed that men should be required to get permission from certifying consultants before getting prostate checks, as women seeking an abortion have to do. This reduced the whole issue to a puerile game of gender tit-for-tat. It got her a cheap laugh, but the nature and purpose of the two procedures are fundamentally different. Prostate checks are about identifying and treating a potentially fatal disease. Their purpose is to save life. But pregnancy is not a disease, a foetus is not a tumour, and the consequence of an abortion is that life is extinguished, not saved. If a high-profile journalist like Mau can’t grasp that crucial difference, we’re in bigger trouble than I thought.”Yep. www.ChooseLife.nz….It can make sense only if the incipient human life is considered intrinsically valueless unless its mother happens to want it. Is that what we’ve come to? In which case, in what circumstances does a life become worth saving? A similar question arose last year amid the general rejoicing at the news that Jacinda Ardern was having a baby. Many of the people who expressed delight at the prime minister’s pregnancy and the subsequent birth of Neve Te Aroha Ardern Gayford support the right of women to have an abortion, no questions asked.But isn’t it odd that we placed such value on Neve’s life when hardly anyone batted an eyelid at the 13,285 unborn babies who were aborted last year? What sort of strange lottery determines that one baby becomes a source of national celebration while others are sucked from the womb and consigned to a hospital incinerator? A similarly strange dichotomy occurs when skilled doctors perform miracles to save fragile newborns while elsewhere in the same hospitals, other doctors are paid by the state to kill them in the womb.More than 40 years after abortion was made pseudo-legal, we seem to be no closer to resolving this moral conundrum. It’s an issue that now confronts us again as pressure builds for the few existing controls on abortion to be removed.The Big Lie, which you can expect to hear repeated endlessly, is that abortion is a health issue. This is now a feminist article of faith. But no amount of repeating makes it true, because pregnancy and childbirth are not illnesses or disorders, and it’s impossible to imagine anything less healthy for the unborn child than to have its life terminated. The debate will be ugly – we know that from 1977. And the anti-abortion camp will be fighting with one hand tied behind its back, because the media are overwhelmingly pro-choice.Alison Mau proposed during a radio debate that men be required to get permission from certifying consultants before getting prostate checks, as women seeking an abortion have to do. Journalist Alison Mau gave an early example of the fatuous arguments likely to be deployed when, in a one-sided panel discussion on Radio New Zealand, she proposed that men should be required to get permission from certifying consultants before getting prostate checks, as women seeking an abortion have to do. This reduced the whole issue to a puerile game of gender tit-for-tat. It got her a cheap laugh, but the nature and purpose of the two procedures are fundamentally different. Prostate checks are about identifying and treating a potentially fatal disease. Their purpose is to save life.But pregnancy is not a disease, a foetus is not a tumour, and the consequence of an abortion is that life is extinguished, not saved. If a high-profile  journalist like Mau can’t grasp that crucial difference, we’re in bigger trouble than I thought.READ MORE: https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/opinion/108250663/what-sort-of-strange-lottery-determines-that-one-baby-is-celebrated-while-others-are-abortedKeep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more

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Trojans to host Bears

first_imgWin number two of the season has proved to be more elusive than the USC men’s basketball team would have liked.The Trojans (1-3) have been competitive in their first three attempts to earn their second victory, but each time have come up short.The Trojans come off a home loss to Cal Poly in which they blew an eight-point lead in the second half, which followed a double-overtime loss to Nebraska and a narrow two-point defeat at San Diego State.“The unfortunate thing is that we are getting our lessons from losing, and we need to take some lessons from winning,” USC coach Kevin O’Neill said. “Losing is a difficult thing to deal with, but it does grow you up.”The Trojans have been relying heavily on inexperienced players. Three starters, freshman guards Alexis Moore and Byron Wesley and sophomore forward Dewayne Dedmon, did not have any Division-I experience before this season, and have experienced some ups and downs.Moore scored 11 points against Nebraska, but has only combined for 11 points in his other three games.Wesley is tied for the second-most assists on the team but has yet to connect on his five attempts from beyond the arc.Dedmon scored 16 points in the season opener against Cal State Northridge, but then recorded a total of 15 points in his next three games.“It is not time to get down on ourselves,” Moore said.In close games, USC is missing the leadership and experience of senior guard Jio Fontan, the Trojans’ leading returner in points and assists, who suffered an ACL tear during an exhibition game this summer in Brazil that could sideline him for the entire season.“The second Jio went down in Brazil, I knew there were going to be some nights like this,” O’Neill said after the game against Cal Poly. “That is not changing. He is not coming back anytime soon.”The Trojans face Morgan State tonight at home at 7 p.m. The Bears (0-3), who compete in the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference, return four starters from a team that went 17-14 last season, led by junior forward Dewayne Jackson, who averaged 14.5 points per game.Over the Thanksgiving holiday, the Trojans will travel to Las Vegas for two games as part of the Las Vegas Invitational.USC will first compete against UNLV on Friday at 4:30 p.m. The Rebels (4-0) are averaging 85.25 points per game, whereas the Trojans are scoring 54.25 points per contest.The winner of that game will advance to face the victor between top-ranked North Carolina and  South Carolina on Saturday at 7:30 p.m., and the two losing teams will play at 4:30 p.m.The Trojans then have two more road games before returning home to face New Mexico on Dec. 10.“There is a lot of basketball yet to be played,” O’Neill said. “We have to get tougher and better.”last_img read more

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