Franjo Tudjman Airport welcomed a millionth passenger – earlier than ever

first_imgFranjo Tuđman Airport recorded its millionth passenger this year, and it happened earlier than ever in the history of Zagreb Airport, more precisely 13 days earlier than last year. The millionth passenger is Ms. Višnja Mrazovac, who traveled on a direct flight of Emirates from Zagreb to Dubai.”The system registered this year’s millionth passenger on a flight to Dubai, which we are especially glad about because Emirates, since its arrival in Zagreb in early June last year, has significantly contributed to the increase in traffic that Zagreb Airport has continuously recorded since opening a new passenger terminal., said Huseyin Bahadir Bedir, Member of the Management Board of Zagreb International Airport dd, emphasizing that since the opening of the new terminal, the airport has set records in passenger and cargo traffic, the arrival of new airlines, the opening of new routes and destinations, and excellent results in passenger satisfaction surveys. “Emirates is extremely satisfied with the response of Croatian passengers since it started operating on the direct line Zagreb-Dubai in June last year. During this period, Croats traveled to Dubai, but they also used our wide network of destinations to travel to Asia, Australia and Africa. It is our support for Franjo Tuđman Airport on this special occasion of welcoming the millionth passenger that reflects our continued commitment to the Croatian market. ”, said Martin Gross, Emirates Regional Manager for Croatia. The millionth passenger Višnji Mrazovac, who traveled to Delhi with her husband via Dubai on an Emirates flight to visit her son who was employed there, was presented with congratulations and gifts, so Franjo Tuđman International Airport and Aelia Dutyfree gave her a gift voucher, and Emirates Airlines donated two return airline tickets to Dubai. The gifts were presented by Huseyin Bahadir Bedir, Member of the Management Board of Zagreb International Airport and Predrag Popović, Sales Director of Emirates Airlines for Croatia and Slovenia. “I really didn’t expect this, I’m very pleasantly surprised. Just yesterday I read that the millionth passenger at the Franjo Tuđman Airport is expected, but I couldn’t even imagine that it would be me. We often travel through the Emirates, we can’t wait to use these airline tickets. We will be happy to make a purchase in the Aelia Dutyfree shop immediately. “, said this year’s millionth passenger Višnja Mrazovac.Passenger traffic growth of 11%In the segment of passenger traffic, since the opening of the new passenger terminal, Franjo Tuđman Airport has recorded continuous growth, and this trend will continue in 2018, with a cumulative growth of 11% increase in passenger traffic. Positive traffic results are accompanied by positive results of the survey on passenger satisfaction related to airport services. Thus, Franjo Tuđman Airport is in the regular world assessment of the quality of airport services (Airport Service Quality) conducted by the International Airport Association ACI (Airport Council International – World), won the award in the category of airport with the largest improvement of services in 2017 in Europe – Most Improved Airport in Europe in 2017last_img read more

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Governor Wolf: Boyertown Decision Affirms Pennsylvania Values of Tolerance, Respect

first_imgGovernor Wolf: Boyertown Decision Affirms Pennsylvania Values of Tolerance, Respect National Issues,  Non-discrimination,  Statement Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf issued the following statement on the U.S. Supreme Court’s action that will allow students of Boyertown Area School District to use the bathrooms and locker rooms that correspond to their gender identity:“The Supreme Court’s decision is a victory for the values on which Pennsylvania was founded. It is an affirmation that there is no place in Pennsylvania for discrimination, especially in our public spaces. This ruling should be a reminder that Pennsylvania should be a place where everyone is treated fairly and with respect.“I want to thank the brave young students who fought to confirm their right to be themselves. No other person should be able to tell them differently. These students are not a threat to anyone. Transgender citizens deserve equal and fair treatment where they learn, work, live and go about their business like anyone else. As long as I am governor, I will stand on the side of fairness for all.” SHARE Email Facebook Twittercenter_img May 30, 2019last_img read more

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Women’s Golf Set To Host Drake Bulldog Invitational

first_imgThe Bulldogs return to competition following the Cardinal Classic where the team finished tied for 14th. Junior Grace Dunn continues to lead the Bulldogs averaging 75.8 strokes per round. Dunn finished 27th at the Cardinal Classic with a total of 224 (74-75-75). Sophomore Sigurlaugh Jonsdottir led Drake in the final round scoring two-over par 74 totaling 232 (78-80-74). Story Links The Drake University women’s golf team will host the Drake Bulldog Invitational Oct. 9-10 at the Echo Valley Country Club in Norwalk, Iowa. The 54-hole event will be held at the Echo Valley Country Club and features seven Midwest teams including Creighton, Nebraska-Omaha, Northern Iowa, Loyola-Illinois, South Dakota and Western Illinois.center_img Live Results Following the Drake Bulldog Invitational, Drake will prepare for the MVC Preview in Newton, Kan. Oct. 16-17.  Print Friendly Versionlast_img read more

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Wave of horse deaths on famed racetrack stumps scientists

first_img Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country By Christa Lesté-LasserreMar. 27, 2019 , 3:20 PM The Southern California racetrack famous for historic wins by thoroughbred greats such as Seabiscuit, John Henry, and Zenyatta is struggling to explain a series of fatal accidents in horses. In less than 3 months, 22 horses have died on the Santa Anita tracks in Arcadia, most of them from catastrophic limb fractures, leading managers to shut it down on 14 March.The string of fatalities has spurred outcries from animal welfare activists and caused major economic loss—but it also mystifies scientists who study horse racing and racetracks. Some believe heavy rainfall may have caused irregular compaction of the dirt track layers, increasing the risk of fractures when horses’ hooves penetrate the ground at high speeds. “Dirt tracks are particularly dangerous because they can seem fine on the surface but hide the compaction deep below,” says Nathalie Crevier-Denoix of the French National Institute of Agricultural Research and the National Veterinary School in Alfort, near Paris. But a battery of tests by U.S. experts has failed to show anything unusual.Injuries so serious they cause death or require immediate euthanasia because they can’t be repaired occur on every racetrack. The most common type is a fracture of the front fetlock, a hinge joint between the foot and the lower leg bones that is “an important shock absorber, like airplane landing gear,” says Susan Stover, a veterinary researcher at the University of California, Davis. At Santa Anita, the catastrophic injury rate has doubled compared with last year. Riders arrive at the Santa Anita track in Southern California on 8 March. SANTA ANITA PARK Researchers used a machine that mimics a galloping horse foot to do biomechanical tests on Santa Anita’s dirt track. 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Some experts also suspect veterinary drugs. Joe Pagan, president of Kentucky Equine Research in Versailles, recently found that furosemide, used to stop airway hemorrhaging as a result of exertion, and omeprazole, a treatment for stomach ulcers, both affect calcium excretion and absorption, which could theoretically weaken bones; the Stronach Group, which owns Santa Anita, recently said it would ban the use of drugs on racing days. But Pagan says a connection to the injuries is “a big stretch.” Others have noted that more than 90% of racehorses nationwide have stomach ulcers, and most are treated with furosemide, so the drugs’ effects wouldn’t be limited to Santa Anita.Instead, many scientists think something about Santa Anita’s dirt track must be to blame. After the 21st death this season, the Stronach Group invited Mick Peterson of the Racing Surfaces Testing Laboratory, a nonprofit organization in Lexington, Kentucky, to study the problem. Peterson ran chemical and x-ray diffraction studies on track samples, testing, among other things, the soil’s density, moisture content, and mineralogical qualities.He also examined the consistency of the track’s layers. The top layer, called the cushion, is soft and granular, to dampen the impact on the horse’s foot; the one below, called the pad, is harder and more compact, allowing for more “push-off ” of the hoof. (Below that are two more layers called the hardpan and the base.) Horses probably adjust to different surfaces as long as they’re consistent, Peterson says, but injuries could result if the track characteristics change from stride to stride. His team brought in a machine, towed behind a vehicle, that mimics a galloping horse’s forelimb plunging into the track and collects data on deceleration, sliding, surface elasticity, and energy absorption. They also used ground penetrating radar to measure the depths of the layers every 10 centimeters along the track. IRFAN KHAN/LOS ANGELES TIMES/GETTY IMAGES None of the tests revealed anything unusual. “There’s nothing that we know, based on what we know, that’s wrong with the track,” Peterson says. Santa Anita reopened its tracks on 11 March, after his results had come in; within days a 3-year-old filly sustained fractures in both forelimbs and was euthanized, and the shutdown resumed.Peterson says current testing methods could miss problems with moisture management on the dirt track. The cushion layer works best when it contains about 14% water, he says. Track managers have an array of techniques for managing moisture, such as sealing water out during wet weather by rolling the surface overnight, or “harrowing” and watering the track during dry weather to offset evaporation. But moisture levels can still change dramatically throughout a race day, especially when heavy rainfall alternates with bright sun and desert winds. Complicating matters further, Santa Anita’s grandstand casts a large, evolving shadow across part of the dirt track. The departure of Dennis Moore, a seasoned surface manager who retired from Santa Anita in December 2018, may also have played a role, although it’s not clear how much practices have changed since then. “If the maintenance wasn’t perfect, that may have been a factor,” Peterson says.Peterson is now studying how well different management techniques work after rainstorms. Necropsies of the fallen horses may also offer clues by revealing whether certain types of injury were more common.Santa Anita officials didn’t respond to Science’s request for comment. But they have evidently decided they can’t wait for science to come up with definitive answers. Moore has been brought back as a consultant, and as Science went to press, Santa Anita was slated to reopen on 29 March.last_img read more

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