Investors call for action after Brazilian mining disaster

first_imgThe Church Commissioners for England and the Church of England Pensions Board (CEPB) have been joined by the Council on Ethics for Sweden’s AP1, AP2, AP3 and AP4 funds, Dutch pension giant APG, the UK’s LGPS Central and New Zealand Super, as well as several asset managers. The Church of England is leading calls from institutional investors for a global independent public classification system to monitor the safety risk of “tailings” dams linked to mines, after a collapse in Brazil killed 100 people.More than 200 people are missing following the collapse of the dam in Brumadinho in the south east of Brazil on 25 January.The dam was an embankment used to store by-products of iron ore mining operations, and its collapse resulted in mudslides that engulfed local communities. The human toll was accompanied by potential contamination from the red iron ore waste that swept across the countryside.The Mina Feijão operation in Brumadinho is owned by Brazil’s largest mining company, Vale. “We have lost confidence in the sector’s ability to regulate itself on this issue”John Howchin, AP funds’ Council on EthicsThe group has proposed that the new classification system for safety risk should be independent of mining companies and require annual audits of all tailings dams, as well as verification that the highest corresponding safety standards were being implemented. All reporting should be made public through a database accessible to communities, governments, civil society and investors. John Howchin, secretary general of the Council on Ethics, said: “We have lost confidence in the sector’s ability to regulate itself on this issue. The consequences when something goes wrong are clear. We will be working with other investors to insist the necessary steps are taken.”Adam Matthews, director of ethics and engagement for the CEPB, said: “These failures of tailings dams should not be happening. These are not black swan events.“An independent classification system will ensure that communities, workers and investors know the safety standards of tailings dams are in place and if they are being applied. This proposal will drive a new level of accountability and transparency within the mining sector.”The group is planning to convene a meeting of international industry experts and major investors in the sector. This will take place in London, chaired by David Urquhart, Bishop of Birmingham.All shares in Vale held within the Church Commissioners’ and CEPB’s portfolios – worth £10m (€11.4m) in total – were disposed of shortly after the disaster occurred.Institutional investors have previously called for change at mining corporations including Vale following a similar disaster in Brazil in 2015.The CEPB said it has engaged for some years in ongoing dialogue with mining company senior staff in relation to the companies’ role in society. It has also “heavily engaged” with commodities giant Glencore on climate, and health and safety.last_img read more

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Sixteen records tumble at GAPL Raw Nationals

first_img… Maycock and Rahim cop Best Lifters titleA WHOPPING 16 records fell on Sunday at the Guyana Amateur Powerlifting Federation’s (GAPLF) RAW Nationals 2019 which was held at the St Stanislaus auditorium.Vijai Rahim copped the best Male Lifter title on Sunday at the GAPLF Raw Nationals 2019.When the dust had settled, Esther Maycock had copped the Open Class Best Female Lifter and Open Classic Best Female Lifter titles while Vijai Rahim was adjudged the Best Lifter in the Male Open Classic.Competing in the 84+ kg Women’s Open Raw category, Maycock squatted 135kg, bench-pressed 70kg and deadlifted 157.5kg for a total of 362.5kg.Coming in second, behind Maycock, was Shelly Ann Gomes. She competed in the 63kg Women’s Open Raw class and had a squat of 90kg, bench-press of 47.5kg and a deadlift of 125kg for a total of 262.5kgMeanwhile, in the 74kg Men’s Open Raw, Rahim had a monstrous 222.5kg squat, a 127.5kg Benchpress and a whopping 302.5kg deadlift all for a total of 652.5kg. In that same category Jamal Bentley squatted 160.0kg, bench-pressed 120.0kg and deadlifted 207.5kg for his total of 487.5kg which landed him in second place.The Records that fell are as follows:WTCLS      EVENT             FULLNAME          KG                     DIVISION120kg         Total        Ramzam Mohamed           610.0             Male Junior Raw120kg         Squat       Ramzam Mohamed           247.5             Male Junior Raw120kg   Bench Press   Ramzam Mohamed           137.5             Male Junior Raw120kg      Deadlift           Jeremy Smith               302.5             Male Open Raw59kg         Total               Jermy Indarjit              450.0              Male Sub-Jr Raw59kg         Deadlift          Jermy Indarjit              207.5             Male Sub-Jr Raw59kg         Deadlift         Navindra Tamasar        207.5             Male Open Raw66kg         Total            Romario Gonsalves         602.5            Male Junior Raw66kg         Deadlift       Romario Gonsalves        260                Male Junior Raw74kg         Deadlift        Vijai Rahim                   302.5             Male Open Raw83kg         Deadlift         Hardat Tarson              270                Male Open Raw83kg         Total              Hardat Tarson              640.0             Male Open Raw93kg         Total              Nigil Phillips                652.5             Male Master 1 Raw93kg         Squat             Nigil Phillips                262.5             Male Master 1 Raw93kg    Bench Press       Nigil Phillips                142.5              Male Master 1 Raw93kg     Deadlift            Nigil Phillips                247.5              Male Master 1 Rawlast_img read more

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Wasilewski: Hack reflects on being the girl in sports

first_img Published on April 26, 2020 at 12:07 am My first few semesters working in-house, if anyone in the sports office said something remotely idiotic or made any kind of faux pas, they were sent on a lap, typically by the sports editor. Laps have since become a thing of the past. When I started in sports though, everyone was sent on a lap for one thing or another. It took about a month for me to take my first lap, and I guarantee I made some brilliantly terrible puns during that month that were completely lap worthy. But, it took a slip of the tongue, a use of the magic word we, to finally get the staff to send me around the house for the first time. The thing is, it was that punishment that finally made me feel a part of the sports staff. The thing is, for my first three years at The Daily Orange, my most consistent title was the girl in sports. New people would come into the office and introductions would go around. Someone would slip that phrase in when introducing me. It was my badge and I wore it every day. It’s pretty self-explanatory, no other girl stayed like I did. Many would make fleeting appearances, get a byline, an introduction at Sunday meetings and then be gone. So it was just me. Second semester freshman year was the first time I remember someone calling me the girl in sports. I was walking into Newhouse and someone stopped me and asked if I was that girl. I remember feeling proud. I was the girl who did what many before me didn’t. I stuck around and kept writing despite a completely male section. That feeling of pride’s worn off. Every time that phrase was used it was a reminder that one of us was not like the others. That for me to know, enjoy and understand sports was some kind of undaunted feat. For everyone else in that office it was a given. I was a member of the sports staff. Except I wasn’t, not quite. I was the girl on the sports staff. AdvertisementThis is placeholder textMaybe I was paranoid, but my first month working as a copy editor in-house I thought I was disrupting whatever perfectly crafted, male-dominated ecosystem I thought the sports office was. I was the only girl I had ever seen spend any kind of work-related time in that room. I was scared they would resent me for being there, that I was encroaching on some testosterone-laced haven.I feared the rest of the staff wouldn’t take my sports knowledge as seriously. I spent all of high school throwing people off with my sports-related takes. I was concerned that the sports staff would see me the same way. More importantly, I was terrified that I wouldn’t know the name of an athlete or a specific rule and then, instead of being seen as a member of the sports staff, I would perpetuate the stereotype that girls don’t know as much as guys about sports. I didn’t want to set myself back, to lessen any respect I might have in the eyes of everyone in the sports office.I remember the first major copy edit I made to a big story. The story was for lacrosse guide, which meant it went through three or four people and one round of copy editing before it got to me. So, when I saw it said a defender would guard the opposing team’s top defender, I was confused. The sentence made no sense to me. But the story had already gone through how many people and no one caught the error, so maybe it was right. I texted my dad and my brother asking if it made sense. Both said no. So after worrying about that one edit for longer than I care to admit, I texted the writer a full paragraph explaining why I thought it was wrong. He told me I was right and I changed it. The whole time I was worried that if I was wrong, the rest of the sports staff wouldn’t respect me in the same way.The thing is though, I don’t think I really was the girl in sports to the sports staff, at least most of the time. I was the one who wore dresses and occasionally made them listen to Taylor Swift and enjoyed the idea of completely defacing the 744 ceiling. I know now that those guys have my back; I have their respect. They spent the past few years enduring my fantastic puns, brilliant ideas and the occasional rant. At the end of the day, I wouldn’t have wanted to be the girl in any other office. I hope that title dies, the girl in sports. I hope that women with an appreciation for sports aren’t singled out, made to feel alien. I hope for the future of women in sports. It shouldn’t be seen as some great achievement for a woman to be working in sports media. The women I know in this field are incredible, capable people and deserve to be respected as such. And the future is looking up. While I’m leaving, two women are taking my place. Two women will be in the sports office late at night next semester. They won’t be the girls in sports, but women working in the sports section. And I am so damn proud. Kaci Wasilewski was a senior staff writer at The Daily Orange, where her column will no longer appear. She can be reached at  [email protected] or on Twitter at @Kaci_Waz.– 30 — Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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