AREVALO BRGY ON LOCKDOWN: Treñas orders ‘extreme ECQ’ in Sto. Niño Sur

first_img* city government officials * 48-year-old female (Patient No. 80) Mayor Jerry Treñas. ARNOLD ALMACEN/CMO Within 72 hours or three days, the results of the tests on the close contacts of the five COVID-19 cases would have been released already, and these would be the bases for the city government’s next steps, said the mayor. There would also be mandatory COVID testing on all high-risk and medium-risk contacts of the COVID-19 positive cases to be conducted by the City Health Office. * offices and businesses are closed Barangay Sto. Niño Sur has 2,015 households. * 57-year-old female (Patient No. 79) The four other cases were confirmed just this May 5. Three of them were barangay health workers while the other one was the bookkeeper of the barangay council. He issued Executive Order (EO) No. 070 yesterday ordering an “extreme enhanced community quarantine” (EECQ) in Barangay Sto. Niño Sur. * transportation (private and public) is suspended * 55-year-old female (Patient No. 73) * 48-year-old male (region’s Patient No. 66) * officials of the IATF ILOILO City – With five confirmed cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), Barangay Sto. Niño Sur in Arevalo district was placed on a 72-hour lockdown beginning 12:01 a.m. yesterday “unless a longer period is required to conduct mandatory random testing,” according to Mayor Jerry Treñas. * city health personnel * 43- year-old female (Patient No. 78) * residents must stay at home * quarantine passes are suspended * healthcare workers, sanitation personnel of city government * police, soldiers, PSTMO, force multipliers and volunteers maintaining peace and order According to Treñas, only a little over 500 test results have been released so far, so the public should not be surprised if the number of confirmed cases would soon increase. All the five Sto. Niño Sur cases were among the so far 1,507 city government frontliners subjected to COVID-19 testing. For the duration of the EECQ, the city government “shall provide the food and medical needs of the residents…Barangay officials shall secure the list of necessary medicines of the residents (and) submit (this) to the City Health Office immediately.” People can catch COVID-19 from others who have the virus. The disease can spread from person to person through small droplets from the nose or mouth which are spread when a person with COVID-19 coughs or exhales. During the three-day lockdown, the following must be observed within the barangay: Treñas tasked the barangay officials of Sto. Niño Sur to enforce his EO with the help of the Iloilo City Police Office, Philippine Army, Bureau of Fire Protection, Public Safety and Traffic Management Office (PSTMO), and force multipliers. * Philippine Red Cross personnel He also identified the following as the only authorized persons to enter and leave Barangay Sto. Niño Sur: * personnel distributing food and medicines to the barangay residents The Barangay Sto. Niño Sur cases – now all at the city government’s quarantine facility – were the following: These restrictions, however, do not apply to persons who need immediate hospital care and management and those persons allowed by the executive order. * Department of Health (DOH) personnel Patient No. 66, the barangay’s – and Arevalo’s – first COVID-19 patient, worked as driver of the Iloilo City Emergency Responders. Part of the EO read: “Whereas, the Inter-Agency Task Force for the Management of Infectious Diseases (IATF) Resolution No. 11, Series of 2020 provides that a barangay-wide quarantine may be imposed where there are at least two COVID-19 positive cases belonging to different households in the same village.” These droplets also land on objects and surfaces around the person. Other people then catch COVID-19 by touching these objects or surfaces, then touching their eyes, nose or mouth. * Bureau of Fire Protection personnel/PNlast_img read more

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Scholars identify new gene

first_imgSean Curran, assistant professor in Biogerontology, and Shanshan Pang, postdoctoral fellow, have identified a gene which allow organisms to adapt to dietary changes, according to their published report in Cell Metabolism.Dynamic Duo · Assistant Professor Sean Curran (left) and Shanshan Pang (right) utilized a milimeter-long worm to study the new gene. – Akshat Khanna | Daily TrojanCurran and Pang observed the effects of diet on the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans, a millimeter-long worm frequently used as a model organism. The specific gene identified in their study, alh-6, is expressed in a wide range of organisms, ranging from yeast bacteria to humans. Specimens with a mutated alh-6 gene aged prematurely when subjected to a nonstandard diet.“Although in people we have the same genes, [alh-6], there are small differences, and that’s going to change just slightly how the function works,” Curran said. “I think there’s going to be hundreds more gene-diet pairs to be found. Because [the research] is at the early stages, it’s hard to predict how many there are going to be, or how long it’s going to take.”Though most students might not necessarily adhere to a strict diet such as veganism or a ketogenic diet, eating to promote good health seems to be a common goal.“I just subscribe to a balanced diet,” said Maya Barnes, a junior majoring in business administration. “You want to eat proteins and good fats, but that doesn’t mean completely cutting out everything you want to eat.”Diet can be of particular importance to athletes. It is difficult, however, to empirically gauge the effectiveness of a diet for an individual without going through a process of trial and error.Zacharie Smith, an undeclared freshman, noted how his commitment to football affects his diet.“I’m just trying to eat more often throughout the day, eating smaller meals, [eating] fruits and vegetables and trying to stay away from pasta,” he said.Roberto Yslas, a junior majoring in economics and mathematics and an avid hockey player, echoed Smith’s sentiment.“I don’t really like the word           ‘diet’ — I prefer the word ‘nutrition,’ Yslas said. “I choose foods that will fuel my body and the good thing is I happen to find that those things taste good too.”Curran envisions a future in which individuals can be matched together with their optimal diets.“Instead of having to trial-and-error test a diet, we eventually can just make correlations and clinically test specific genetic backgrounds and specific diets, and see if those combinations work,” Curran said. “Now, we live in an era when you can sequence your genome for a thousand bucks. Once we identify more of these gene and diet pairs, when you’re born, you can have your genome sequenced and — based on the genes — we can find your chance of success on this diet or on that diet.”Barnes noted that she could see a profitable future for personal diet planning.“I can see [personalized diet planning] becoming successful, because we’ve seen that different kinds of workouts work better for different people, so it would make sense that people metabolize foods differently and with varying levels of success,” Barnes said.Curran believes that though pairing individuals with genetically compatible diets could improve longevity or lead to weight loss, the primary goal of diet pairing would be to increase quality of life and promote good health.“If some scientific method does prove that this is going to be better for your sustenance or growth, I don’t think it could hurt,” said Ashima Sharma, a senior majoring in chemical engineering. “I would diet to promote the best health I can get.”last_img read more

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