Umphrey’s Busts Out “Pooh Doggie” For Superfan’s 400th At Remarkable Brooklyn Bowl Show [Photos]

first_imgAfter two nights at impresario Peter Shapiro‘s rock palace, The Capitol Theatre, Umphrey’s McGee moved the party to Shapiro’s beloved Williamsburg bowling alley/night club for an celebratory finale to their three-night run in New York. The two sets and encore at Brooklyn Bowl last night marked the most complete show of the weekend, which is saying something considering how impressive the band was on Friday and Saturday. Focusing on their older and most cherished material, Umphrey’s was simply on fire, showcasing the intense focus, energy, and precision for which they’re known.Umphrey’s McGee Honors Tom Petty, Covers Toto’s “Africa” To Open Cap Run [Photo/Video]Set one started off with “Conduit”, off 2011’s Death By Stereo. The medium-paced rocker was a great fit for the opening slot, allowing guitarist Jake Cinninger to show off his chops early in the frame. Cinninger’s solo breakdown evolved into an evil-sounding metal segment, with an aggressive power rock jam that built to a strong peak by the song’s end. The hair metal vibes of “Mad Love” followed, eventually fading away as the band started up the beloved instrumental “Fussy Dutchman”. Brendan Bayliss took his turn at lead guitar and ran with it, with an excellent solo the cherry on top of an excellent all-around version of the song.Up next was “Morning Song”, one of the band’s best progressive rock originals. The version was a bona fide bullseye, turning things up in the room for band and crowd alike. As the song finished, the band harnessed that energy and unleashed a big rendition of “Hurt Bird Bath”. The multi-sectional masterpiece opened up with a bass-heavy jam, constructed with several interesting musical building blocks from bassist Ryan Stasik. The whole band synced up around this rock n’ roll vibe, allowing Cinninger to go off on a wave guitar fireworks. As the energy in the room reached a fever pitch, the band dropped back into “Hurt Bird Bath” for the second verse, and then quickly moved into the song’s second jam, marked by an out-there space funk theme. Eventually the band locked in around a part house music-part metal sonic space. Cinninger introduced some metal riffage, and the band delved into full-blown, hand signal-driven Jimmy Stewart-style improvisation. After some physical instructions from Cinninger, the band changed keys and rhythm several times before landing back on “Hurt Bird Bath” to complete the incredible rendition.Prog-funk track “Deeper” followed up the huge first set odyssey, and Umphrey’s kept the improv going with another impressive jam. After bursting out of the funk with some heavy metal, the band settled on a drum and bass jazz fusion vibe, with a melodic peak. Out of nowhere, the band moved into a song unfamiliar to most in the crowd: “Pooh Doggie.” The ultra-rarity was played in honor of Dan Delaney, hardcore Umphrey’s McGee fan who was celebrating his 400th show (!!!) at Brooklyn Bowl last night. Kudos to Dan for the accomplishment, and thanks to him for inspiring the band’s mega-bust-out at The Bowl. The song was last performed in Dallas, TX on 11/10/2006–a mere 1180 shows ago. The rarity closed out the first set, leaving fans clamoring for more after a remarkable opening frame.When the band emerged for their second set, dissonant and ambient sounds started to emanate from the stage. Fans with a trained ear knew that this could mean only one thing: “Nothing Too Fancy.” The electronic-leaning improvisation vehicle provided the jam of the night: a patient and meditative exploration that built into several peaks, with the entire room hanging on every note. The tension was released as Umphrey’s pulled off one of their patented “on-a-dime” transitions, building “Nothing Too Fancy” into a wild frenzy before dropping unexpectedly into “August.” A welcome sing-along, this “August” proved to be one of the nights emotional highlights. The small venue and three-night run invited some of the band’s biggest fans to attend this weekend, and the hardcores really let lose on “August.”The down-and-dirty funk of “Mail Package” provided a much-needed breather after the intense one-two-punch set opener. Things picked back up in a huge way with “#5”, an old favorite that dates back to 2003. The progressive rock masterpiece saw drummer Kris Myers and percussionist Andy Farag offer up some tribal sounds, using his floor toms to create a pulsating rhythm. Joel Cummins eventually linked up with Myers, leaning into his organ line with gusto. The organ sound led to a 80’s rock vibe, which was fitting as the sound eventually dissolved into a slow, piano-led jam that wound its way towards a soaring dual-guitar master class from Cinninger and Cummins. The crowd was in a frenzy, and kicked into another gear when Umphrey’s landed back on the tail end of “Nothing Too Fancy,” finally finishing the version that opened the set.Umphrey’s McGee Plays Nostalgic VIP Pre-Show, Covers Radiohead In Capitol Theatre Finale [Video]The smooth rock vibes of “No Comment” kept the old school feel going, before the band eventually moved back into some more aggressive improvisation (do they ever take a song off?), with Stasik offering up some more amazing bass licks. After flowing into a call-back off “Pooh Doggie” one more time for good measure, they closed out the set with a rocking version of “The Song Remains The Same” by Led Zeppelin. Finally, for the encore, Umphrey’s continued the old favorites with a reggae-tinged version of “Slacker”, which ended up sounding something similar to “The Bed’s Too Big Without You” by The Police. Bayliss was all smiles during this final song of the run, watching with a huge grin as Cummins rocked the organ to close out their weekend in New York.Umphrey’s McGee may be done in the New York area, but they will be back soon, with three recently-announced shows at The Beacon Theatre in January on deck for the band’s 20th-anniversary celebration. In the meantime, Umphrey’s will hit Suwanee Hulaween on Thursday before traveling to St. Paul, MN for two nights at the Palace Theatre, where the band will take a break from their usual Mashup celebration and will debut a new theme for  Halloween.Check out a full gallery of photos from Umphrey’s McGee’s Brooklyn Bowl performance below courtesy of photographer Andrew Blackstein.You can watch a few clips from the show via Instagram below: Load remaining images SETLIST: Umphrey’s McGee | Brooklyn Bowl | Brooklyn, NY | 10/22/2017Set One: Conduit, Mad Love > Fussy Dutchman, Hurt Bird Bath, Deeper > Pooh DoggieSet Two: Nothing Too Fancy -> August, Mail Package, #5 -> Nothing Too Fancy, No Comment > Pooh Doggie, The Song Remains The SameEncore: SlackerUmphrey’s McGee | Brooklyn Bowl | Brooklyn, NY | 10/22/2017 | Andrew Blacksteinlast_img read more

Read More »

As only he can, Warriors’ Stephen Curry turns fake-moon-landing farce into teachable moment

first_imgAnd now for something completely foreseeable.The Warriors’ Stephen Curry on Wednesday delivered the inevitable rim shot to the whole fake-moon-landing kerfuffle, telling ESPN, “Obviously I was joking when I was talking on the podcast. (Then) I was silently protesting how stupid it was that people actually took that quote and made it law as, ‘Oh my God, he’s a fake-moon-landing truther,’ whatever you want to call it yada, yada, yada.”Because it sucks to be late to the party, here is what he …last_img read more

Read More »

Where Angels (And Apple) Sing: Music Moving to the Cloud

first_imgTags:#cloud#Trends Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Luckily, we aren’t in the business of trying to figure out what exactly is up Apple’s sleeve at the upcoming Jan. 27 event at Yerba Buena Gardens. Much speculation has surfaced in recent weeks on what products and services will announced. Now, in addition to the iTablet madness, new information comes in the form of several reports that Apple is set to announce a cloud-based music service. This will likely incorporate its recent purchase of the Lala application with Apples’ hardware and iTunes empire, bringing a ray of hope that iTunes will become more social – as suggested by ReadWriteWeb’s Sarah Perez nearly two years ago.Let’s focus on the positive implications of a cloud-based music service and take a quick look at what it will take for Apple to be a success in the cloud.Ease of use A requirement across the service will be ease of use, and an understanding of how and where music is can be used and shared. Lala has made progress in this area in its partnership with Google, and Apple is legendary for its focus on easy-to-use products. To win over consumers, Apple must present both the streaming and the controls as a superior option, instead of a barrier like DRM has been in the past. Rights management In 2009, Apple made major changes to iTunes to remove the DRM barrier, which open up music playback options considerably. If the company goes forward with streaming services, a major challenge in managing that is tracking the sales channel. Apple is uniquely positioned to handle this challenge due to iTunes and its existing and extensive supply chain. New versions of iTunes give users the ability to share music between rooms in a house and devices in a network. The application logs that sharing, which allows Apple to prepare its distribution channel for different types of delivery. Steve Jobs authored an open letter to the music industry in 2007 and laid out three options for how Apple could proceed to solve the challenge of DRM. Option three was clearly the most attractive from Apple’s view, quoted below:“The third alternative is to abolish DRMs entirely. Imagine a world where every online store sells DRM-free music encoded in open licensable formats. In such a world, any player can play music purchased from any store, and any store can sell music which is playable on all players. This is clearly the best alternative for consumers, and Apple would embrace it in a heartbeat. If the big four music companies would license Apple their music without the requirement that it be protected with a DRM, we would switch to selling only DRM-free music on our iTunes store. Every iPod ever made will play this DRM-free music.”Network services and discovery A key component of of this service will be the ability to find music on personal networks and share it with other people. Apple has led the industry with services like Bonjour and peer-to-peer networking on the iPhone. But there still seems to be a lot of room for challenge in this area – as we’ve seen with the iPhone in providing a reliable service that meets all conditions, especially in the mobile world. The first implementations of peer-to-peer networking between devices on the iPhone have required developers to work on top of the core framework to work around dropped connections, latency and other issues. In the IP world, Cisco and others had to solve this with QoS (quality of service) protocols on top of the networking stack. It seems likely that these types of extensions will be needed for streaming music between mobile devices, as well for it to be a pleasure to use in mobile environments.Identity management Perhaps the crux of this capability will be the ability to identify and manage real users on the network who are accessing and sharing copyrighted work. This has been the key issue with services like BitTorrent (which don’t show personal information) and MP3s, didn’t require any logging or identification of the person and allow the file to be played by anyone who copies it. Clearly the music industry requires a balance between distribution being easy and viral – and getting paid for the appropriate copies per license of the music. Due to licensing requirements and the challenges of copying digital works, knowing that a person is unique is key, and having the hardware that plays the music is required to keep track of appropriate usage and fees. Apple has already made major steps forward in all areas of its business in having unique keys for individuals. And with the iPhone it has benefited greatly from the clear assumption that a person is connected to their device in a one-to-one relationship that can be tracked.Scaling The true test of any service is whether it can be successfully scaled to users without fail. Of all of Apple’s success in the industry, the one challenge we have witnessed was the release of Push Notification and MobileMe. Both of these share the characteristic of scaling large scale messages. Apple seems serious about cloud-based music services; perhaps this is one of the reasons the company is building a massive new data center, and building additional relationships with carriers and backbone providers. If any part of Apple’s execution track record can be scrutinized, scaling would be it.From a review of the evidence, it looks like Apple has been quietly working hard at getting all of the puzzle pieces together for streaming music. If these pieces work and scale as planned, Apple may be in a position to solve the issue of sharing intellectual property – and monetizing it. Here’s hoping Apple can make lightening strike twice and transform an industry once again.What do you think, will Apple deliver a controlled sharing blueprint for music? Will this be applied to all copyrighted information assets in the future? 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketcenter_img Related Posts A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… mike kirkwoodlast_img read more

Read More »