Community effort set to get Ballyshannon ticking again with new clock face

first_imgMovie-goers might recall that line from Back to the Future when, on November 12, 1955, lightning struck the clock tower providing enough power — 1.21 gigawatts, in case you forgot —  to send Marty McFly and the DeLorean back to the future to 1985.But, in Ballyshannon, it’s not time travel that interests the local regeneration group.They are in the midst of installing a new town clock in the south Donegal area following a huge community drive. Following a lightning strike of their own in 2014, the old clock was damaged beyond repair, prompting a south Donegal regeneration group to take matters into their own hands.Several community fundraisers later and enough money was raised for the new clock, a project the Ballyshannon Regeneration Group have been involved with from the beginning.Cllr Barry Sweeney, who is a founding member of the group, told Donegal Daily: “(The clock) was hit by lightning in a storm over six years ago and it has not been fixed since.“Now, a lot of people were talking about fixing it and doing something about it but it was owned by private owners at that stage. “So, we decided to come together and assist in the project and we initially had the idea of a false face at no real cost and we got permission to do that from the owners.“But as time went on, we wondered how much a real face would cost and so we decided to do a bit of fundraising for it.“And over the last two years, we have raised over €14,500 to date,” he added.“And in the meantime, a new owner had bought the building.”The original clock face was built in 1878 when an agreement was struck between the planning authorities and Belfast Bank. The old Ballyshannon clock face was struck by lightning in 2014 leaving it in a state of disrepair.The building was later owned by the Royal Bank before an amalgamation with the Provincial Bank resulted in the Allied Irish Bank forming there in 1966.Local businessman Eamonn McNulty, who now owns the building, purchased the property from the well-known Gallogley family earlier this year.“When a new owner was confirmed, we kind of made the decision to go ahead with the project because there is great value in this project for the community.“We had an opportunity to do something symbolic in the town and we had so many people who had donated,” Sweeney added. “Now, the new owner is doing a lot of the work in terms of getting this project going again and we are working together with him.“But one of the great things about this initiative is that it is all local craftspeople coming together to make it a reality.“And it will be great for the building as well because now it is being cared for and something is going to happen to the building to project and preserve it into the future.“We don’t know yet what form that is going to take because there is plenty of ideas out there, some that are viable and others that are not.“But everybody involved wants the building to be used for something appropriate and meaningful when decided.“As for the clock project, it has taken a lot longer than we hoped but we are nearly there.”Community effort set to get Ballyshannon ticking again with new clock face was last modified: October 8th, 2019 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Read More »

Emergence issues showing up after a wet start to May

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The nearly ideal planting conditions followed by extensive rains statewide have led to some unusual crop emergence problems for corn and soybeans in Ohio.Peter Thomison reported several instances of somewhat unusual corn emergence issues.“Often the problems were associated with corn seedlings leafing out underground and it’s likely weather and seedbed conditions were responsible for the occurrence of the abnormal growth. Seedlings exhibiting abnormal emergence may have a twisted appearance because internal leaves start expanding before the seeding has elongated. ‘Corkscrewed’ mesocotyl/coleoptile development may occur when the coleoptile encounters resistance (like soil crusting or a dense soil surface) as the mesocotyl elongates. Several factors (or combination of factors) may be responsible for this abnormal growth. These factors may be characterized as environmental, chemical, or mechanical. Environmental conditions associated with underground leafing include light penetration, cold soils, or heavy rains soon after planting. When plants unfurl below the soil surface, they usually turn yellow and die,” Thomison wrote in a recent CORN Newsletter.There can also be issues in cloddy fields with uneven sunlight warming the soil and, as was the case this spring in some fields, heavy rains can cause surface crusting and challenging corn emergence conditions. Herbicides can also cause some similar issues, Thomison said.“Certain herbicides, such as cell growth inhibitors like acetochlor, and various premixes that contain their active ingredients can show similar symptoms (i.e. twisting, abnormal growth) when excessive rates are applied pre-emergence. Besides excessive rates, improperly closed seed furrows can allow the pre-emergence herbicide to come in direct contact with the seed,” Thomison said. “Prompt treatment with a rotary hoe, weeder, spiketooth harrow or cultipacker may help break the crust and improve emergence. However, even when used carefully, these salvage operations can cause some damage to seedlings, which are emerging normally. To minimize poor seedling emergence due to unfurling below the soil surface, watch for cloddy seedbeds, open seed furrows, and crusting surface soils after rains.”Ohio State University Extension plant pathologist Anne Dorrance points out that, in many ways, the situation in early May was a perfect storm for soybean problems.“For most of these situations we have the following scenario: PPO herbicides (flumioxazin, sulfentrazone, saflufenacil) included as a component of the preplant burn down, fields planted seven days later with fungicide treated seed, followed by one to two weeks of suboptimum growing conditions between 40 to 50degrees F for two weeks, and greater than two inches of rain. These conditions are very conducive to both Pythium damping-off and PPO injury,” wrote Dorrance and Extension herbicide specialist Mark Loux in a recent CORN Newsletter. “Some of the reports from the field were with seedlings that have already croaked. Wispy skeletons of soybean seedlings could be found on or below the surface. These are most likely from Pythium, it moves fast under these conditions. Other seedlings had black at the hypocotyl hook with a reddish brown on the underside of the cotyledon. These could be PPO injury.”In some of the severe cases, it may be difficult to tell the cause of the problem.“There is still much to learn from this unusual weather pattern, but if the soybean plants are slow to get out of the ground they are exposed to the herbicide/cold temperatures for a much longer period of time. In addition, with soybeans and cold soil temperatures, they are stressed and leak nutrients — signal compounds which attract seedling pathogens. If they are stressed they may also be more vulnerable to PPO injury,” Dorrance and Loux wrote. “How to tell the difference between pathogen, flooding, and PPO injury is not going to be easy this year as all three may be present in the field at the same time.”If the plant dies from a pathogen, it will have soft tissue and consistent browning on the bottom of the seedling. With flooding injury there will be a smell from the anaerobic conditions in the field. For severe cases, there may also be algae on the soil surface and the seedlings may have gray roots on the outside with white inside the roots, Dorrance said. If the problem was PPO injury there will be necrosis on the emerging shoot, variable rate of emergence, possibly some growth distortion, and failure to emerge or plant death if severe, Loux said.No matter what the problem, the warm, sunny conditions that followed in the third week of May helped, if it was not already too late.last_img read more

Read More »

Tips for Traveling With Your Production Gear

first_imgTraveling with film production equipment can be daunting, but these tips will help you move efficiently and keep your gear protected.Top image via ShutterstockI’ve traveled with production equipment for out-of-town shoots numerous times — and unfortunately, I’ve encountered a fair share of issues. As a result, I’ve picked up some valuable insight along the way. Traveling with gear poses a variety of challenges — from extra fees to misplaced items — but the tips on this list will help you keep things in check next time you embark on an out-of-town shoot.1. Don’t OverpackImage via TWEAK DigitalFilmmakers know the importance of being prepared. As such, they have a tendency to overpack their gear when traveling for a shoot. While they may know that they’ll only need one camera body and a few lenses, they often opt to bring all sorts of extra components, accessories, audio gear, or other items that likely won’t be of any use to them on set — for that “just in case” scenario.Unless your shoot is in the middle of nowhere, most destinations will permit you to rent extra gear if you need it in a pinch. Not to mention, this is something you’d likely know in advance of your travels. Steering clear of unnecessarily large kits will help you avoid additional fees for overweight baggage, but also the headache of keeping track of gear you won’t even be using in order to prevent losing anything along the way.2. Use Carry-On CasesImage via PelicanLuggage that’s placed in a plane’s cargo area isn’t always handled with care, and the last thing you want to do is put thousands of dollars worth of equipment into harm’s way. To avoid having to do this, simply invest in Pelican cases that are small enough to meet the carry-on baggage specifications. The size requirements for carry-on may vary between airlines, so always be sure to check size requirements before your trip.3. Get Customs ClearancesImage via AirlineReporterIf you’re leaving the country with your gear, you may need to get your equipment precleared by customs to avoid having it held up at the border. For instance, if you live in the United States and you’re returning from a European shoot, customs may ask to see proof that your camera was originally purchased in the U.S. If it was bought overseas, it would likely be taxed to some degree upon entry.If you’re asked for this information at the border but don’t have it, you may not be able to bring your equipment (and more importantly your footage) into the country right away. Different countries will handle scenarios like this differently, so depending on where you’re traveling to and what you’re traveling with, be sure to call customs/border protection before your trip to ensure you have all the documents you need.4. Get InsuredImage via ShutterstockThe unfortunate reality when traveling with equipment is that your gear is far more likely to be damaged on the road, even if you do everything you can to protect it. There are so many unforeseen scenarios that can occur while traveling, some of which may result in multiple airport and airline staff handling your gear — while knowing next to nothing about the equipment. In this way, travel definitely comes with increased risks for damages where your gear is concerned.The best thing you can do is ensure that your equipment is adequately insured. This means double-checking that your current policy covers certain circumstances, such as while you’re in the act of traveling or while the equipment is out of the country. If not, be sure to top up your coverage to include whatever your circumstances require — before you leave.Traveling with gear can be a pretty big headache. In most cases, I recommend renting gear locally to avoid incurring some of the unexpected costs discussed here. But if you absolutely must travel with your own kit, be sure to follow the tips on this list to reduce your potential exposure to damaged or lost equipment.Got any other travel advice for filmmakers and videographers? Share it in the comments below.last_img read more

Read More »