Harvard Gazette’s top stories of 2018

first_imgFollow Harvard on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram to see more great moments from the past year. Milestones, innovation, analysis, and inspiration from the University and beyond Harvard Gazette’s top stories of 2017 Related The Year in PicturesThese were the stories that were too big for just words“The center in the crossroads”Students and staff embraced Harvard’s new Smith Campus Center.,“The ending as beginning: Commencement ‘18”There were cheers and tears at the 367th Commencement ceremony.,“Beauty in the eye of the microscope”by Rachel TraughberNew tools helped Harvard researchers display the world in unexpected and compelling ways.,“Playing The Game, both past and present”by Jon ChaseThe celebration transcended generations when Harvard beat Yale at Fenway Park.,“Catching up with the class of ‘48”by Jon ChaseA wonderful look at the lives of alumni at 90 and beyond.,Deep DivesThese were the in-depth stories that our readers couldn’t put down“‘What the hell — why don’t I just go to Harvard and turn my life upside down?’”by Colleen WalshPart of the Experience series, then-President Drew Faust opened up about family, history, and the illness that urged her forward.,“Onward and upward, robots”by Alvin PowellFirst in a series on cutting-edge research at Harvard, researchers showed off the unique approaches they are taking with robotics.,“‘The greatest gift you can have is a good education, one that isn’t strictly professional’”by Liz MineoHoward Gardner talked about his secret to a successful career and a happy life.“A summer of service to cities”by Christina PazzaneseThe Bloomberg Harvard City Leadership Initiative is working to help city officials be more effective and train the next generation.,“‘To be horrified by inequality and early death and not have any kind of plan for responding — that would not work for me’”by Alvin PowellPaul Farmer talked about making impoverished lives his life work.,Social MediaThese were the stories that we had to sharecenter_img As a new year approaches, we look back at some of the Gazette’s most-read and best-loved stories of 2018.Campus LifeThese were the stories that made us laugh, cry, and connect to each other“Facing the future, Lewis and Faust see reason for hope”by Alvin PowellIn a time of uncertainty, Congressman Lewis and then-President Faust urged the graduating class to rise to the challenge of a world in need of leadership.,“Harvard names Lawrence S. Bacow as 29th president”After an extensive search supported by faculty, students, staff, and alumni, Harvard welcomed its 29th president.,“Not just a humanities cat”by Rose LincolnAfter four years at Harvard, Remy the cat has had pretty much the full Harvard experience.,“It’s Housing Day, with snowballs”by Aaron GoldmanFirst-year students battled the snow to learn where they’d live next.,“When her life is over, she’ll have lived”by Jill RadskenHarvard senior Elsie Tellier uses courage, strength, sadness, and compassion to respond to her lethal disease.,“Spreading the word on college admissions”by Liz MineoHarvard students developed a college admissions guide to help others traverse the competitive path.“Bringing a dying language back to life”by Brigid O’RourkeThrough Harvard’s Project Teach program, an instructor is teaching seventh-graders the origin of the Gullah language.,“Mourning Devah Pager”by Jill RadskenHarvard mourned the loss of Devah Pager, an academic “force of nature,” remembered for her trailblazing scholarship and extraordinary mentorship.,From the LabThese were the stories that explored the world around us and the mysteries within us“When science meets mindfulness”by Alvin PowellThe first in a series that looked at the expanding research on mindfulness and stress.,“How fast can we run?”by Alvin PowellThe chair of the Department of Human Evolutionary Biology discussed the body’s triumphs and limits.“Microbes by the mile”by Deborah BlackwellHarvard researchers shared the beauty of the microscopic world.,“Five healthy habits to live by”by Karen FeldscherHarvard Chan researchers looked at over 25 years of data to get a better idea of which habits are the healthiest.,“Songs in the key of humanity”by Peter ReuellA Harvard study questioned whether music is more universal than we previously thought.,The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. Top stories of 2016 Looking back at some of our most-read articles of the yearlast_img read more

Read More »

Four Lakers storylines to follow going into 2nd half of the season

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREUCLA alum Kenny Clark signs four-year contract extension with PackersAside from one four-game losing streak, all against likely playoff-bound teams, the Lakers have strung together mostly long, sustained winning streaks. They’ve had four different streaks of at least seven straight wins, and have gone 22-1 against teams with losing records – whereas many teams oscillate in focus during the January doldrums of the year, the Lakers have mainly stayed on course, even through injuries. Even for James, it’s one of his best starts to a season.Here are four storylines that have defined the Lakers’ red-hot start so far, and how they’ll continue to define the season and playoff berth to come:1. A REAL TEAM CHEMISTRYOne of the striking aspects of the Lakers’ one-point loss to the Magic on Wednesday night was how Quinn Cook talked about how much James and Anthony Davis have kept his spirits up and encouraged him while he’s been sitting on the bench: “Literally, him and A.D. give me confidence every single day, and that means a lot.”Look at some of the recent events, when nearly the entire team was at James’ 35th birthday party, or when Davis flew three teammates and a coach out to Green Bay for a football game. A photo taken on the team plane after a 3-0 swing through the West is likely to be a lasting image of this group. All the way to the end of the roster, there’s bonding: James recently called Jared Dudley “one of the best teammates I ever had.”After last year’s debacle, there seems to be a renewed emphasis on blending the roster together from both management and James himself. There’s a trickle-down from James’ and Davis’ relationship that helps shape the dynamic. That’s not to say that there’s isn’t restlessness on the team, or that there is a particularly democratic element to the power structure, but the smoothness of the blend has seemed profound and genuine relative to common locker room chemistry – and a considerable step up from last year’s fractures. Lakers, Clippers schedules set for first round of NBA playoffs How athletes protesting the national anthem has evolved over 17 years LOS ANGELES — NBA observers wondered what LeBron James would do with a longer offseason than he’s enjoyed in 14 years. They assumed he would come back physically primed, ready to compete after an injury-marred 2018-19 campaign that ended in failure.But James also spent some time apparently thinking about team dynamics and how to build them, which was one of the reasons that he invited his Lakers teammates to Las Vegas for an informal “mini-camp” in September that was voluntary, in name. Everybody went, giving the team a chance to do light workouts, but more importantly to get to know one another.“We had some nice dinners, nice lunches that we had – did some things together throughout those days, and I think it just kind of springboarded what we wanted our season to be about,” James said recently. “Obviously the wins and losses will take care of itself. You don’t ever know what’s gonna happen with that. But as far as how we can come together and how we can be just very blunt and very organic to one another is something that you can control.”James, and the Lakers by extension, didn’t want this season to be like the last. And halfway through, this one looks like what everyone hoped. The Lakers are the clear leaders in the Western Conference, 4-1/2 games ahead of their nearest rivals. An 0-2 record against the Clippers is cause for some anxiety, but at 33-8, they’ve played as well as any contender has a right to expect. It’s something the Lakers recently likened to a strength of the San Antonio dynasty – even when stars sat out, the Spurs still won.“We have great depth,” Vogel said. “We have a group that will go out and defend for 48 minutes. You always have a chance.”Looking ahead: The Lakers have so far avoided serious long-term injuries (aside from DeMarcus Cousins), and the stars have stayed healthy. The Lakers are 1-1 without James and 4-2 without Davis, but no one wants to test how that would play out over a longer stretch. The Lakers will attempt to stick to a “marathon mentality” and could get to a point in March or April when the focus turns to staying healthy, but with James at 35 and Davis seemingly prone to nagging injuries, this will be a huge factor in how far the Lakers can go this postseason. Trail Blazers, Grizzlies advance to NBA play-in game; Suns, Spurs see playoff dreams dashed center_img Trail Blazers beat Grizzlies in play-in, earn first-round series with the Lakers Lakers practice early hoping to answer all questions Looking ahead: The Lakers haven’t faced much true adversity, and in their longest losing stretch, injury kept the team from getting too concerned about its results. It’s worth wondering whether the biggest test of team unity will arrive during the postseason and if the good vibes so far are a result of winning games, or vice versa.2. DEFENSIVE STAMPEntering the season, it was easy to see how James and Davis would catapult the Lakers forward on offense, and with both players averaging more than 25 points on a team with the fourth-best offense in the league (113.1 offensive rating), that’s been the case. But on defense? The end where it looked like James had fallen off for the last few seasons?Coach Frank Vogel came in with a mandate to build a defensive identity, and he’s done that: The Lakers are No. 3 in defensive rating (104.6 points allowed per 100 possessions) and well ahead of the rest of the Western pack. They’ve pounded opponents out of the restricted area, totaling a league-leading 7.2 blocked shots per game. That’s translated directly into offense: They’re No. 4 in points off of turnovers (18.5 ppg) and Davis, James and other Lakers are often at their best in the open court after a stop.That comes from having defenders such as Avery Bradley and Danny Green as well as shot-blockers like Davis and JaVale McGee. But James’ buy-in has been one of the most surprising pieces, and the coaching staff gets some credit for that, too.Looking ahead: Not that they haven’t played good teams before, but an upcoming five-game trip through Boston and Philadelphia will test the Lakers’ physicality against some of the best Eastern Conference teams they haven’t played yet. The Lakers veterans will have to keep that focus up for the trip and the rest of the season. They’d also probably like depth on the wings, having had some trouble guarding players such as Kawhi Leonard, Luka Doncic and Pascal Siakam.3. SUPER SUBSAs recently as July, who could have imagined that Staples Center would give Dwight Howard a hero’s welcome? Or that Alex Caruso, a two-way contract player last season, would lead the team in net rating (plus-13.7)? Or that Kentavious Caldwell-Pope would recover after missing his first 11 shots of the year and getting booed at home?Even though Kyle Kuzma’s scoring is down from last year, he’s had big games – especially as a spot starter – and the rest of the bench has been good enough to cover for nights when other rotation starters aren’t playing so well. Many nights, James has been a key factor in those second-unit lineups, helping power comebacks and close out wins. But undoubtedly players like Howard and Caruso have played above expectations, giving the star tandem plenty of support.Looking ahead: As with every aspect of the Lakers, age has to be a concern. Howard has a checkered injury history, and Rajon Rondo does as well. Both are potentially big pieces of any postseason run for the team as currently constructed. But the bigger question is Kuzma, who has been the subject of low-grade, never-ending trade buzz. If he can’t find his groove off the bench, will the Lakers look to move him at the deadline? That’s a huge question in the makeup of this team.4. PLAYING WELL WITH WHO’S AVAILABLEThere have been games without both stars, as well as injuries to Bradley, Kuzma and Rondo. With a few hiccups, it mostly hasn’t mattered. A Saturday win over Oklahoma City demonstrated that the Lakers seem ready to play every night even under the most adverse circumstances.Related Articles Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

Read More »