Latest: Arsenal 0 Chelsea 0 – Blues edging closer to another point

first_imgChelsea almost took the lead and might have been awarded a penalty in a lively first half at the Emirates Stadium, where a win would leave them on the verge of being confirmed as champions.The second half has been much less eventful so far, with the visitors edging towards a draw that would restore their 10-point lead at the top of the Premier League.Just after the quarter-hour mark, former Arsenal star Cesc Fabregas, jeered by many of the home fans on his return to north London, lifted the ball forward and after Laurent Koscielny failed to clear, Oscar nipped in and lobbed David Ospina.Keeper Ospina clattered into Oscar, leaving him in a heap on the floor, and Gunners defender Hector Bellerin headed off the line to deny the Brazilian what would have been his first goal since January.Chelsea had two other shouts for a penalty waved away by referee Michael Oliver.Oscar went down early on after after contact with Bellerin and on 22 minutes Fabregas was booked for diving following a challenge from Santi Cazorla.And at the other end, Gary Cahill was given the benefit of the doubt after blocking Cazorla’s shot with a raised arm.With Diego Costa and Loic Remy still not fit, Chelsea started without a recognised striker, with Oscar deployed in a central attacking role, supported by Eden Hazard, Ramires and Willian, before being replaced at half-time by Didier Drogba.Drogba, who has scored 15 goals in 15 matches against Arsenal, had a shot comfortably saved by Ospina before Per Mertesacker wasted a decent chance for the hosts when he fired wide.A Chelsea victory would mean they can clinch the title by beating Leicester on Wednesday. Chelsea: Courtois, Ivanovic, Cahill, Terry, Azpilicueta, Matic, Fabregas, Ramires, Oscar (Drogba 45), Willian, Hazard Subs: Cech, Filipe Luis, Zouma, Mikel, Loftus-Cheek, Cuadrado. Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Welcome to the Religion Department; I Am Your Evil Atheist Professor

first_imgThe religion professor who organized a class at U of Kansas called “Special Topics in Religion: Intelligent Design, Creationism and other Religious Mythologies” (see 11/21/2005) was caught red-handed expressing his real intentions.  According to Knight-Ridder stories in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer and Macon.com, an email from Paul Mirecki became public in which he had said, “The fundies (fundamentalists) want it all taught in a science class, but this will be a nice slap in their big fat face by teaching it as a religious studies class under the category ‘mythology.’”  His letter to the Society of Open-Minded Atheists and Agnostics, a student organization for which he serves as faculty adviser, and which he referred to as “my fellow damned,” was signed off with, “Doing my part to (tick) off the religious right, Evil Dr. P.”  Mirecki is Chairman of the Religious Studies department.    The Chancellor had a word with him, after which Mirecki apologized for his “ill-advised email I sent to a small group of students and friends.”  He promised he would teach the class “as a serious academic subject and in an manner that respects all points of view.”  The class has also been renamed to simply “Intelligent Design and Creationism.”    Legislators got word of this email and were not pleased.  There was discussion of withholding funds from the school.  Quoting the article, Rep. Brenda Landwehr, vice chairwoman of the House Appropriations Committee, called the e-mail “venomous,” adding, “He’s not sorry he wrote it.  He’s sorry it became public.”Update 11/30/2005: Mirecki has canceled the class.  KansasCity.com and The Guardian (UK) reported that the furor caused by his email was too much.  Chancellor Hemenway called the attitudes expressed “repugnant and vile,” and said it “misrepresents everything the university is to stand for.”  A state senator called the words “hateful” and felt the University did the right thing by listening to the public’s outrage and canceling the class.  Bob Crowther on Evolution News doubts Mirecki’s sincerity; he has found a track record of similar antireligious statements by Mirecki.There you have it, folks.  Parents, when you sent your precious sons and daughters to college, with visions of enlightenment, scholarly advancement and the contemplative life, is this what you had in mind?  Were you aware the devil was head of the religion department?  Do you accept his apology for half a second?  Do you believe for a moment this wrist-slap is going to stop his face-slapping intentions?  Better wake up; this is not an isolated case.   This was the university that took up arms against the Kansas school board in their attempt to de-dogmatize Darwin and permit (not mandate) critical discussion of his views, but attitudes like Mirecki’s are rife in today’s radical-leftist academic institutions.    Now you know why a fair and honest discussion of intelligent design is hard to come by in most universities.  One can only hope enough people are repulsed by this venomous behavior enough to drive the vermin out, open the windows, clean out the garbage, and let in some fresh air and sunshine, to recreate that once-sacred environment for the free exchange of ideas among scholars motivated by a love of the truth.(Visited 12 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Anchiornis: Foot Feathers Confuse Bird Evolution Story

first_imgThe paper on Anchiornis huxleyii was published in Nature,1 along with a News article about it in the same issue by Lawrence Witmer.2  In addition, popular reports were printed by the BBC News, Live Science and Science Daily.    The popular reports are focusing on Xing Xu’s claim that this fossil removes the last argument that birds could not have evolved from dinosaurs because this fossil gets rid of the “temporal paradox” – the fact that the alleged “feathered dinosaurs” were all younger in the fossil record than Archaeopteryx, the earliest known bird.  Anchiornis has been assigned to strata dated 1 to 10 million years earlier than Archaeopteryx, effectively removing that objection.    Other than that, this fossil is confusing.  It has long feathers on all four legs – even on the hind feet.  The feathers get shorter closer to the body.  Scientists can’t figure out if the feathers allowed the creature to fly or glide.  If not, what function did they perform?    The animal had elongated hind legs.  It seems that foot feathers would have interfered with flying and with walking on the ground.  Some modern birds have feathered feet but not long, pennaceous feathers.  Based on this new discovery, and on the previous fossils Microraptor gui (11/16/2005, 03/27/2007), and Pedopenna (feather-foot; see New Scientist 19 Feb 2005), evolutionary biologists are trying to piece together a story of feathers first evolving on the extremities and then moving inward toward the body.  That begs the question of what the feathers evolved for in the first place.  The authors try to explain,Extensive feathering of the pes [foot] is also seen in some modern birds, and serves an insulating or protective function.  In most cases the feathers are not organized into a coherent planar surface as in Microraptor, Pedopenna and Anchiornis, which indicates that the pedal feathers of these fossil taxa may have differed from those of extant birds in having an aerodynamic function.  This would imply that a four-winged condition played a role in the origin of avian flight, as suggested by previous studies, although this conclusion is not universally accepted.  However, the significant differences noted above between the large pedal feathers of Anchiornis and those of Microraptor suggest that these feathers might have been less aerodynamically effective in Anchiornis than in Microraptor.It would seem that going from four wings to two wings represents devolution, not evolution, unless two wings are shown to be more efficient for flying.  Even so, the sudden emergence of a four-winged animal would seem improbable for natural selection.  Anchiornis adds to the puzzle by causing doubt that the feathers were aerodynamically effective.  Yet distal feathers don’t seem to provide much of an insulating or protective function.  Why would natural selection produce structures as complex as feathers for no purpose?  Witmer explained,More to the point, it now looks as if we’ll have to accept that avian evolution indeed went through – at the risk of overstatement – a four-wing stage, only to eventually lose the long foot feathers.  What this means for the evolution of the avian flight stroke is now an open question.  Likewise, we’ll need to seriously consider how these otherwise seemingly very adept and agile runners (Anchiornis has extremely long and slender hindlimbs) could manage with long feathers on their feet.What does Anchiornis mean for evolutionary history?  “The presence of a troodontid in the earliest Late Jurassic indicates that all groups of derived theropods had originated by this time,” the paper said.  The common ancestor of these groups (Troodontidae, Dromaeosauridae and Avialae) therefore remains to be discovered earlier in the fossil record.  Witmer took it as a plug for evolutionary theory that similarities in early representatives of these groups (e.g., the foot feathers) shows that paleontologists are converging on the common ancestor.  “It’s getting hard to tell members of one group from another,” he said.  “On the bright side, in this year of Darwin, that fact provides a comforting affirmation of the evolutionary prediction that species in different groups will become increasingly similar as we approach their common origin.”1.  Hu, Hou, Zhang and Xu, “A pre-Archaeopteryx troodontid theropod from China with long feathers on the metatarsus,” Nature 461, 640-643 (1 October 2009) | doi:10.1038/nature08322.2.  Lawrence M. Witmer, “Palaeontology: Feathered dinosaurs in a tangle,” Nature 461, 601-602 (1 October 2009) | doi:10.1038/461601a; Published online 30 September 2009.This is an opportunity to compare hype with fact.  The news media and the discoverers are all chirping that they have an example of bird evolution here.  A transitional form between dinosaurs and birds has been found, and now the naysayers need to bow at the feet of the Charlie idol and admit they were wrong.  It should be noticed that the Darwinists did not predict finding a dino-chicken with long feathers on its feet.  What is this thing?  Look at the predictions they had made.  The ancestor of birds either learned to fly from the ground up (cursorial) or the tree down (arboreal).  The cursorial hypothesis appears down and out if this animal had anything to do with it.  Witmer just wondered how this animal could manage to run with feathers on its feet.  Put some long feathers on your feet and see if it helps your takeoff.  The arboreal hypothesis might still be a contender, but it is 09/06/2007 for the convoluted tale).    There remains no clear picture of the evolution of flight – particularly of powered flight and all the systems required to support it.  There are only an assortment of odd, extinct creatures that paleontologists try to sort into man-made categories.  Remember that it’s not just the taxonomic categories that assume evolution; it’s the geological categories and the dating methods.  Evolutionary paleontology has become a self-fulfilling prophecy.  Since the outcome is never in doubt, every find becomes part of the ever more complex story of evolution.  They insulate their story from falsification by contorting any and all data to fit the story somehow.  It is not science.    All right then, what are creationists saying?  Creationists do not accept the dating scheme, the millions of years, the creative power of natural selection, or the phylogenetic stories.  The strata diagram in the paper shows alternating bands of andesite, shale, siltstone, agglomerate and tuff.  To accept the column, one has to believe that only one kind of material was deposited for many tens or thousands of years (longer than all human history), then another kind for more thousands of years, then another, then a repeat of the first type of material, over and over.  Alternative mechanisms could allow for these layers to be deposited rapidly.  The time interval between Anchiornis and Archaeopteryx and the other creatures could therefore be so small as to make them contemporaneous.  These are questions evolutionists never ask because they are married to the Geologic Column.  The whole Darwin story would collapse if it were called into question.  Evolutionists need to get off the Lyellian bandwagon and recognize the paradigm-shaking powers of catastrophism.  It could rewrite the history of the Liaoning deposits.    Anchiornis, then, represents another species that went extinct among a majority of past species that went extinct.  It was not evolving into something better.  If anything, it was evolving downward.  Combine this with what we know about the Cambrian Explosion, the young material in dinosaur soft tissue, and the capacities for rapid geological change in catastrophes, and it is the Darwinists who need to explain themselves, not their critics.  Hint: every time you find a Darwinist begging the question in his or her story, stop them right there.  Say, “Excuse me, I do not accept that assumption.  What do you mean there were ten million years between those two strata?  Prove it.  Were you there?  I do not accept your line that this was a transitional form on the way to birds.  Don’t you realize that taxonomists classified the maniraptorans and troodontids based on evolutionary assumptions that dinosaurs and birds are related by common ancestry?  I do not accept those assumptions, therefore I do not accept the classification scheme and the story built on it.”  Make them explain their story from first principles using observations and testable data.  Then ask the hard questions: “Do you realize how many beneficial mutations would be required to make a feather out of a scale or piece of fuzz?  How can you possibly believe it happened?  Don’t you know that birds have exquisitely designed bones and wings and respiratory systems for powered flight?  Have you seen a hummingbird or eagle?  You expect me to believe that some dinosaur fell out of tree and gave rise to the cormorant and falcon?  How is that even remotely imaginable, given the complexity of DNA codes and proteins and biochemical systems?  A few oddball species interpreted within your scheme are not convincing.  There should be thousands upon thousands of transitions showing every step along the way if your story were true.  Why don’t you admit with anti-creationist Stephen Jay Gould that the presence of systematic gaps in the fossil record is the trade secret of paleontology?  Come back when you can trade in facts, not dredge up isolated oddballs to force-fit into an increasingly implausible tale.”(Visited 67 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Science Proves the Morally Obvious

first_imgWhen scientists find that virtue brings reward and vice bring trouble, are they doing a better job than preachers and parents?  Hold that thought while reading some of the things scientists have been telling us lately about ourselves.“R-Rated Movies Increase Likelihood of Underage Children Trying Alcohol.”  Thank Science Daily for that bit of advice that emanated from Dartmouth University.  A study published in Prevention Science “showed that R-rated movies not only contain scenes of alcohol use that prompt adolescents to drink, they also jack up the sensation seeking tendency, which makes adolescents more prone to engage in all sorts of risky behaviors.”“Kids Taught Self-Control Behave Better at School.”  Parents might not have known that without help from an article on Live Science about a study conducted by University of Rochester Medical Center.  “Children taught skills to monitor and control their anger and other emotions improved their classroom behavior and had significantly fewer school disciplinary referrals and suspensions, according to new research.”“Video-game ownership may interfere with young boys’ academic functioning,” said PhysOrg.  Parents may be relieved to have the authority of science to back up their orders to go to the bedroom and do the homework.  Whether it was ethical to experiment with 6- to 9-year olds for four months to find this out was not stated.  It could be an issue, though, because “the boys who received the video-game system at the beginning of the study had significantly lower reading and writing scores four months later compared with the boys receiving the video-game system later on.”  What permanent setbacks and bad habits were created in the minds of the little boy lab rats?  “These findings suggest that video games may be displacing after-school academic activities and may impede reading and writing development in young boys,” the article continued.  “The authors note that when children have problems with language at this young age, they tend to have a tougher time acquiring advanced reading and writing skills later on.”  Maybe they justified this experiment on the grounds that sacrificing a few boys for the sake of scientific knowledge of possible practical benefit to the public was morally acceptable.“New Research Looks at Beliefs About God’s Influence in Everyday Life,” wrote Science Daily, noting the truly astonishing finding that “Most Americans believe God is concerned with their personal well-being and is directly involved in their personal affairs, according to new research out of the University of Toronto.”  My, where have the scientists been?  Apparently not in church – nor in logic class.  “Many of us might assume that people of higher social class standing tend to reject beliefs about divine intervention,” explained Scott Schieman (U of Toronto).  “However, my findings indicate that while this is true among those less committed to religious life, it is not the case for people who are more committed to religious participation and rituals.”  Maybe he expected that more of the religious were participating in spite of their beliefs.  On one thing he was clear, though: the job of interpreting this phenomenon belongs to scientists: “Given the frequency of God talk in American culture, especially in some areas of political discourse, this is an increasingly important area for researchers to document, describe, and interpret.”“Happiness Is Experiences, Not Stuff,” explained Live Science.  Eight studies converged on that finding that was published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.  The researchers based their conclusions on questionnaires that asked participants things like visualizing a vacation deal, or how satisfied they felt with a purchase they made.  It’s not clear if there was some sort of satisfactionometer instrument used, or what the metric units were.“Modern man found to be generally monogamous, moderately polygamous,” announced PhysOrg, accompanied by the iconic image of man emerging from the apes.  This study was done not by observing human behavior but by discerning patterns in the genes.  The author did not make any value judgments about monogamy, however.“Students’ Perceptions of Earth’s Age Influence Acceptance of Human Evolution,” a story on Science Daily announced, before going off into a discussion of polls and the law.  The authors of a survey published in Evolution apparently didn’t catch the logic that without belief in deep time, belief in evolution is unlikely.  The lead author used the survey to give an NCSE-style application: “The role of the Earth’s age is a key variable that we can use to improve education about evolution, which is important because it is the unifying principle of biology,” said Sehoya Cotner (U of Minnesota), noting with horror that “about one in four high school biology teachers in the upper Midwest are giving students the impression that creationism is a viable explanation for the origins of life on Earth” – something she denounced as “just not acceptable.  The Constitution prohibits teaching creationism in schools,” she added, something readers might have trouble finding in the Constitution, which does not mention teaching or creationism.  It might also be hard to defend that statement since the Declaration of Independence, written by the same group of founding fathers, had said all men are created equal and endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights.On the other hand, scientists sometimes announce counter-intuitive findings that make moral judgments.  For instance, Live Science told its readers that some looting in Chile after the earthquake might have been caused not by loose morals but by survival instincts.  Taking food could be “excusable given the circumstances,” the article said, and “if people do take non-necessities, such as TVs, they’re probably not thinking about right and wrong since these uncertain situations can lead to a breakdown of social norms”.  Was that a reference to situational ethics?  The article noted that most people act altruistically in the aftermath of disasters.  Daniel Kruger at the University of Michigan commented, “If we were absolutely selfish when disasters like this strike, I would be surprised if we survived as a species.”    More and more, scientists are inserting themselves into the moral dimensions of human life.  Not only do they scrutinize and analyze our moral instincts, they also play preacher and give us advice.  Live Science, for instance wrote about “How to Grow Old Gracefully.”  Much of the advice is common sense, or advice you would hear from a doctor.  But Rachael Rettner also noted that “Churchgoing and a generally sunny outlook on life have also been linked to longer, healthier lives.”  (It is left as an exercise whether following that path would promote the belief in evolution that Cotner said is important.)  What is notable is that the scientific researchers seem to expect that their opinions on these matters should carry more weight than those of religious leaders and other scholars or experts.  Do religious leaders, theologians and non-scientists have any voice left in answering the third of the three great philosophical questions, (1) Ontology: What exists?; (2) Epistemology: How do we know what we know?; (3) Ethics: How should we live our lives?Not that long ago people wanting a moral compass would seek the Scriptures and talk to a trusted pastor, priest or rabbi.  Many still do, but the cultural elite act as if those opinions are of no value, and we must look to scientists for answers.  They treat “the religious” as lab rats like the little boys with video games.  What if the tables were turned?  What if the scientists had to sit in church and hear a preacher say, “Thus saith the Lord”?  And why shouldn’t they?  They need to repent.  They are breaking the Ten Commandments.    A logical truth overlooked by researchers is that scientists have absolutely nothing to say about ethics without input from a theological world view.  If naturalism is their world view, ethics reduces to Stuff Happens.  There are no gridlines, guidelines or goals.  They do not have the functional operators in their toolkit for h(S), this stuff Should happen, or h(!S), this stuff Should not happen.  Should is not in their vocabulary.  Only a theological perspective can say should.  Indeed, only a theological perspective makes the three philosophical questions meaningful and approachable.  Consequently, we just caught several scientists (in the stories above) plagiarizing Judeo-Christian assumptions about right and wrong – that is, using their principles without attribution, as if they were their own.  Thou shalt not steal.  Thou shalt not bear false witness.*Exercise:  List some other Commandments the scientists might be breaking by pretending to exercise secular, naturalistic authority on moral matters.  You can find some suggestions in the introduction to our online book, The World’s Greatest Creation Scientists.*Steal=h(!S)=0; BFW=h(!S)=0; source=Ex 20.(Visited 7 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Ohio Ag Net Podcast | Ep. 108 | HOLY COW! Dairy Farm Under Investigation and Outrageous Hay Prices

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The 108th episode of the Ohio Ag Net Podcast, sponsored by AgriGold, includes hosts Matt Reese, Joel Penhorwood, and special guest Candace Lease. They discuss the investigations against Fair Oaks Farms after the undercover animal abuse video was made.Joel Penhorwood interviews sale organizer of the LaRue Horse and Tack Sale, Janeen Heilman about the crazy high prices of hay at the sale ($65/bale). Matt Reese speaks with our Between the Rows Farmers, Dylan Baer from Wood County and Nathan Brown from Highland County.last_img read more

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Water, Water Everywhere at Green Building Conference

first_imgAfter a daylong home tour, the NAHB National Green Building Conference got rolling in earnest on Monday, May 17, in Raleigh, N.C. While slightly smaller than a few years ago, the conference had a respectable turnout and some good educational sessions for attendees. Kept to a concise day and a half with five sessions running concurrently, it was easy to miss some good talks—unless, of course, not only could you split your personality, but also your body. The GBA team was, not unexpectedly, very well represented at the conference—on the tour, for the awards, and as educational session leaders.Water was one of the major subjects of the conference. One session covered water reuse systems, including both central and local wastewater treatment systems. One key point made was that while the average American household uses 400 gallons of water per day, only about 3 gallons are consumed by people. Why are we using drinking water to flush toilets, water lawns, and fill fountains? Mike Hoover of NC State University made the point that while treating wastewater to potable standards is very costly, treating it to non-potable standards is not, pointing out that we use a lot of energy to treat water to a level that is not required for its use.Another water session was led by Ryan Taylor, an architect friend from Atlanta, who shared great data and suggestions about water efficiency with deliberation and detail that eludes me in my presentations. I like to think that our styles complement each other nicely.Green? Tense? Say what?GreenTensives, a new concept this year, were a full day of open discussions on various subjects, including energy efficiency, indoor air quality, resource efficiency, and water efficiency. I don’t know who came up with the wacky name, but the sessions were well-attended, lively discussions. I led the session on water efficiency, which was a solid hour of good conversation on the subject. The two GreenTensives (I am still having trouble with that word) I attended—one on energy efficiency by Peter Yost and one on resource efficiency by Michael Strong—were spirited and informative.Peter made some excellent points that struck home, including:All builders are guinea pigs, and they should demand that manufacturers provide them not just products but complete systems, such as windows with flashing and sheathing with the best housewrap.We put insulation in wall cavities not because it is the best place to put it, but because it is the cheapest place.Buy from vendors with the most knowledgeable field reps who will come out to your job site.And now to the exhibit hallI was impressed by a few vendors on the show floor, where I saw some products I had never seen before. My unofficial award for elegant simplicity goes to the unfortunately named Tenmat recessed light cover. A fireproof preformed cover for recessed lights that protects them from insulation and helps provide an air seal, this product should fly off the shelves into the hands of weatherization contractors. Too bad they weren’t exhibiting at Affordable Comfort or Resnet, where they would have been more appreciated.Another product that caught my eye was recycled granite from Earth Stone Products. Having developed a Huck Finn type of business model, they are paid to haul scrap stone counter material from fabricators, cut it into various shapes for tile and paving installations, and sell it to contractors. Not only do they not pay for their materials, but someone actually pays them to take the stone away. I like the product and the business model. Here’s hoping they are wildly successful.Finally, while not a new product, Masonite’s Safe ‘N Sound green doors are new to me. These interior doors look like typical molded panel doors, but they are made with low-formaldehyde and low-VOC finishes and adhesives and are available with wheat straw cores and FSC-certified wood.Overall, this year’s conference was, in my opinion, a modest success. The NAHB markets primarily to members—and with membership down and the industry still in a slump, they are challenged to increase attendance, which this conference deserves. Continuing to experiment with sessions such as GreenTensives and adding additional advanced trainings will help carry them forward.last_img read more

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Quick Tip: Learn How a Color Grading Qualifier Works

first_imgLearn how a colorist’s qualifier works and how to use the controls to fine tune a key!Color grading applications have the ability to pull a key (similar to keying a green screen), but instead of making the keyed color transparent, the program uses the matte to affect either the selected color or every color but the one selected.There are 3 main controls, each having a few sub-control to fine-tune. The three main controls are hue, saturation, and luminance qualifiers.The hue qualifier limits the key based on hue. The center control shifts the selection up and down the hue spectum. The width control limits which hues are selected by narrowing the range. The soft control adjusts the tolerance (hues only partly selected are partially affected – basically treated as gray on an alpha matte). Last, the symmetry control lets you have more softness on one side or the other.The saturation and luminance qualifiers give you upper and lower limit controls, plus individual softness controls for either side. In color grading applications you can use any combination of these three controls, or you can just use one of them, giving you a huge amount of control in pulling secondary keys.last_img read more

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Ray Allen watches PBA game, catches up with ex-teammate Bill Walker

first_imgEthel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ In an interview with Sports 5, Allen said that he is in the country for vacation.He said he doesn’t have anything concrete planned but it seems like he’s been checking out a lot of basketball here.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingHe visited the Lyceum Pirates Tuesday night before watching the PBA at MOA where his former Celtics teammate and now Blackwater import Bill Walker was playing.The 42-year-old Allen announced his retirement in a letter on The Player’s Tribune in 2016, two years after playing in the NBA Finals which turned out to be his last game. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netNBA legend Ray Allen surprised Filipino fans at Mall of Asia Arena as he showed up during a PBA game between TNT and Blackwater Wednesday.Allen, who is a two-time NBA champion with the Boston Celtics in 2008 and the Miami Heat five years later, flew to Manila from Hong Kong on Tuesday.ADVERTISEMENT One of the greatest shooters basketball had seen, Allen finished his 19-year career as the all-time leader in 3-point shots made with 2,973.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ LATEST STORIES NATO’s aging eye in the sky to get a last overhaul Dumaan dedicates pencak silat gold to family Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side MOST READ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong protesters Biggest Pogo service provider padlocked for tax evasion Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games View commentslast_img read more

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