Saudi football player in hot water for dabbing

first_imgMOST READ However, the seemingly innocuous move is illegal in Saudi Arabia for its links to drug use. The country’s National Committee for Combating Drugs claims that the dance move suggests sniffing drugs.Inquisitr reports that during a King’s Cup match, a player from Saudi club Al Nojoom was walking toward the benches when a teammate reached out to high-five him. The player dabbed instead.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkA video shared on the Twitter account of sports broadcast app Dawri Plus shows the incident. The commentator is heard saying “no, no, no” after the dab.👀#الوحدة_النجوم #دوري_بلس pic.twitter.com/niD2b8ncC9— دوري بلس (@dawriplusksa) January 3, 2018It was unclear what consequences this had for the unidentified player. Saudi TV host and actor Abdallah Al Shahani was arrested after a video circulated of him dabbing in a concert.ADVERTISEMENT UN official: Justice not done for Khashoggi PLAY LIST 01:38UN official: Justice not done for Khashoggi01:29Saudis cut loose at rave-like event00:50Trending Articles02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Scottie Thompson also worthy of Finals MVP, thinks Cone Steam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hours After his arrest and online criticism, Al Shahani issued an apology which read, “I apologize to our respected government and to my audience for unintentionally and spontaneously making the dance move at Taif festival. Please accept my apology.” Dabbing is a common celebratory move in sports, with the likes of Manchester United footballer Paul Pogba and  American quarterback Cam Newton dabbing in games. Even politicians such as Hillary Clinton and French president Emmanuel Macron got in on the act when it was a fading trend.  Niña V. Guno /raRELATED STORIES:Watch Rihanna Dab in Protest of Donald TrumpFil-Am singer Jessica Sanchez defends her move of ‘taking a knee’ during performance of US national anthemADVERTISEMENT OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ’a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Judy Ann’s 1st project for 2020 is giving her a ‘stomachache’ Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Meralco ‘never the same’ after Almazan injury in PBA Finals Jiro Manio arrested for stabbing man in Marikina A dance move may spell trouble for a football player in Saudi Arabia after he dabbed on the pitch.Dabbing is a hip-hop dance move that became a cultural trend in the US in 2015.ADVERTISEMENT Brian Heruela arrival bolsters Phoenix backcourt, defense Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Redemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie Thompson What’s bugging Alaska? LATEST STORIES View comments OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ’a duplicitous move’ – Lacsonlast_img read more

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Woman climbs Errigal during effort to climb 28 mountains for charity

first_imgCounty Down woman El Fegan has challenged herself to climb 28 of Ireland’s highest peaks, spanning all 32 counties, in aid of the Alzheimer’s Society.Mount Errigal marks the half-way point for El as it is the 14th summit she has reached.She says; “Some of the peaks are considerably small so any less than 500m will be done in a 10kg weighted vest to make it a little more challenging.” “I am really looking forward to taking on this charity challenge, it is an exciting adventure for me, a chance to explore our beautiful island, meet new people, as well as an amazing opportunity to raise funds & awareness along the way.”“I have already been overwhelmed with peoples generosity in allowing me to take on this challenge; friends & especially those from the air bnb community who don’t even know me & are willing to put me up a night or 2 along my way.”“I have an amazing bunch of girls who work with me who will cover me while I take almost 3 weeks out of my busy work schedule whilst on the road on & not to mention my house sitter who is going to look after my fur babies.”“Dementia can happen to anyone and there’s currently no cure. There are 850,000 people with dementia in the UK and the number is set to rise to 1 million by 2021.” If you would like to join El you can get in touch in the following places; Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat (@feggie1).To donate to El’s amazing cause you can do so by clicking here. Woman climbs Errigal during effort to climb 28 mountains for charity was last modified: October 15th, 2016 by Elaine McCalligShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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South African English? No jive, my friend

first_imgJacob DlaminiAs a South African based in the US, I’m often asked by foreigners thinking of visiting my country how much English is spoken there. What they mean to ask, of course, is if they would be understood by the locals without having to resort to the exaggerated lip movements and hand gestures that turn even the most well-meaning tourist into a complete idiot. Depending on my mood, I either tell them about our 11 official languages (“My goodness, eleven!” they usually respond) or reply glibly: “You’ll be fine.”What I don’t tell them is that the English spoken on the streets of South Africa is not the English spoken elsewhere. For example, we use words like “just” and “now” the way Americans use ketchup: pretty much everywhere, every time and on everything. See if you can follow these examples: (a) “I am coming now-now but my friend Themba will be there just now”; (b) “Now-now, my friend, just now the shopkeeper next door might hear me giving you a discount on those tomatoes and decide that I’m now a real moegoe”. The average South African would have no trouble with these.Now-now means “right this minute”, while just now means “soon” (with “soon” assuming the most expansive definition possible). On the other hand, you know the person you’re talking to is getting irritated when they start saying “Now-now, my friend” to you, especially if that person is a total stranger. “Friend” is just (that word again) one of those words South Africans seem to reserve for strangers – especially where no niceties are being exchanged. “Now, listen here, my friend!” How many South Africans can claim to never have heard or used that one during a heated moment?This is not to say that South Africans are unfriendly. Oh, we’re so friendly we would happily buy strangers drinks in bars and invite them over to our homes for a meal. We’re so friendly we have no qualms about making fun of people’s sizes, even though we’ve only just met them. A South African would happily ask with a straight face: “So, my friend, is everyone in Ethiopia as obese as you?” Or, “My friend, is every fat person in America named Tiny, or is it just you?”South Africans are also big on emphasis. So instead of saying “now”, we say “now-now”. We don’t just say “sharp” to express our good health and wellbeing, we say “sharp-sharp”. We don’t just say “sure” to mean “of course”, “absolutely”, or “yes”, we say “sure-sure”. That way, we make doubly sure you fully understand what we’re trying to communicate to you. This double usage extends even to the many Afrikaans words that pepper South African English. Take “eintlik”, the Afrikaans word for “actually”. We don’t just say: “Eintlik, what is your problem?” No, we say: “Eintlik-eintlik, what jive?”I know “jive” means dance. But in South Africa it usually means “problem”. What jive? What’s the problem? We also use the word more elastically: “Ngise-jivini” is township Zulu for “I’m in a jive”, meaning “I’m in a mess” or “I have a problem”.It’s not just emphasis we excel in, we can also do empathy like no other. Tell me, my friend, which other people would use the word “shame” to mean pity and many things in between. As a colleague at Business Day once pointed out to me, only in South Africa would people use the word shame when a baby is born (“Shame, what a beautiful baby!”); when that baby falls and hurts itself (“Shame, poor thing!”) and when that baby dies (“Ag shame, what a shame!”). For us, there is no shame in using the word “shame”, even when it seems the word might be inappropriate. There is nothing shameful about a beautiful baby. But we say shame nonetheless. To us, shame is just one of those words that have become something of an omnibus. We use it to mean whatever we want it to mean.I could, but do not dare, tell my overseas friends that while English is spoken everywhere in South Africa, the truth is that there are as many Englishes as there are people who claim to speak the language (either as a first or 11th language). I mean, do our foreign friends really need to know that only surfer-types from Durban use the expression “cool bananas” to mean “cool” and that anyone else who uses that sounds downright silly? Or that the way English is spoken in South Africa follows regional, class and racial lines? Maybe I should refer them to that lovely cellphone company advertisement featuring the comedian Marc Lottering. You remember the ad? The one where he says he speaks plain English … Mitchell’s Plain English.Go to the MediaClub weekly columns home pageJacob Dlamini is a PhD student in History at Yale University, a columnist for The Weekender, and former political editor of Business Day.last_img read more

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Your Client Can Have Anything They Want

first_imgIf the most high-end product, service, or solution that you sell was available at the lowest price in the market, selling would be easy. So easy, in fact, that it wouldn’t be selling at all; it would be order-taking.The price of an offering is based on the value it creates. Products, services, or solutions that create value require a greater investment to make or deliver, and therefore, they require that your client make a greater investment in obtaining those outcomes.You will have prospects and clients that want a level of value with a required price beyond what they are willing or able to invest. You will have clients who ask you to provide them with the additional value that comes only with the greater investment at a much lower level of investment. Because they know the greater value is available, they want that additional value.Some will demand more than they are willing to pay for, insisting that you should include it, that it should be standard, that it is integral to the outcome they need. These folks will have product offerings with similar pricing levels based on the value they create, and a good many may cave in and provide additional value without capturing the value necessary to deliver that value. Others will happily take a loss, losing money on transactions, and attempting to make it up on volume.A useful operating philosophy is to decide that anyone can have anything they want, provided they are willing to pay for it.This means that you are not only going to have to justify the additional value by describing the greater outcomes, something your client is already well aware of when they ask you to deliver it for free, but also that you justify the investment you need to make in delivering that additional value. Essential Reading! Get my 3rd book: Eat Their Lunch “The first ever playbook for B2B salespeople on how to win clients and customers who are already being serviced by your competition.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

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Emery backs Guendouzi after sending off

first_imgDuring the Wednesday’s cup win, 19-year-old Matteo Guendouzi was sent off for the Gunners over Blackpool, but his manager is not worried a bit about the red card shown to the youngster.Drama: @MatteoGuendouzi is shown a second yellow after the referee adjudged him to have pulled down Thompson#CarabaoCup 🔴 2-0 ⚪️ (56) pic.twitter.com/76ekIpBBHw— Arsenal FC (@Arsenal) October 31, 2018Guendouzi will now miss Saturday’s clash with Liverpool as Emery had this to say:“That is football. Things can be positive or negative like an injury, a red card, 90 minutes of hard work that don’t allow you to play other matches,” Emery told reporters via Goal.Jadon SanchoMerson believes Arsenal should sign Sancho Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 Borussia Dortmund winger Jadon Sancho might be the perfect player to play for the Gunners, according to former England international Paul Merson.“A red card is like that.“We have a lot of players looking to play, to help us and take responsibility. His quality for the team, I am going to prepare with other players for the big match.“He’s playing well. He’s playing with a spirit – [he’s] competitive. The action is… it’s an action, he plays that action as a normal moment in the game.“He is pushing behind the player. He is playing with the spirit I want today and every match.“We have spoken. It is very important to control, but I don’t think he lost control. The red card is one circumstance.”last_img read more

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