H5N1 outbreaks confirmed near Moscow

first_imgFeb 19, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – Russian officials today confirmed that suspicious bird deaths in three towns on the outskirts of Moscow were caused by highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza.The H5N1 outbreak killed 34 backyard poultry, including chickens, ducks, geese, turkey, and pigeons, Russian officials wrote in a report to the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE). The affected communities include Babenki, Pavlovskoye, and Shihovo. The Times of London reported today that some of the outbreak sites are within 30 miles of Moscow.A Moscow live-bird market named Sadovod is suspected as a source of the outbreak, because birds from the market were introduced into the backyard flocks, the OIE report said. Authorities closed and quarantined the market Feb 17, the Associated Press reported.Authorities destroyed 196 birds and have quarantined the outbreak areas, the OIE report said. Russia’s Emergency Situations Ministry said more than 94 million birds had received an avian flu vaccine in 2006, The Times reported.Health officials are monitoring 5,453 residents near the outbreak areas, including 20 who had contact with the infected birds, Gennady Onischchenko, Russia’s chief epidemiologist, told The Times today. No human H5N1 cases have been reported in Russia.The H5N1 outbreaks are the first ever confirmed near Moscow but not the first in Russia this year. In late January, officials confirmed three backyard poultry outbreaks in the Krasnodar region, in southwestern Russia near the Black Sea.In other avian flu news, the World Health Organization (WHO) today confirmed Egypt’s latest case, in a 5-year-old boy from Sharkia governorate, 60 miles northeast of Cairo. Egyptian officials reported his case Feb 16. He was admitted to the hospital Feb 14 and is in stable condition, the WHO said. He is Egypt’s 22nd WHO-confirmed case-patient.The boy was exposed to sick birds a week before he got sick, the WHO said. His contacts were described as healthy and under close observation.See also:OIE reports on Russian outbreakhttp://www.oie.int/downld/AVIAN%20INFLUENZA/A2007_AI.phpFeb 10 WHO statementhttp://www.who.int/csr/don/2007_02_19/en/index.htmllast_img read more

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Autism: Traffic pollution linked, study suggests

first_img Share 12 Views   no discussions Heavy traffic in San Diego, CaliforniaThe possibility that autism is linked to traffic pollution has been raised by researchers in California.Their study of more than 500 children said those exposed to high levels of pollution were three times more likely to have autism than children who grew up with cleaner air.However, other researchers said traffic was a “very unlikely” and unconvincing explanation for autism. The findings were presented in the Archives of General Psychiatry journal.Data from the US Environmental Protection Agency were used to work out levels of pollution for addresses in California.This was used to compare exposure to pollution, in the womb and during the first year of life, in 279 children with autism and 245 without. The researchers from the University of Southern California said children in homes exposed to the most pollution “were three times as likely to have autism compared with children residing in homes with the lowest levels of exposure”.They have previously shown a link between autism and living close to major roads.They warn that there could be “large” implications because air pollution is “common and may have lasting neurological effects”.But how?However, other researchers questioned how pollution could alter the brain’s development and lead to autism.Uta Frith, a professor of cognitive development at University College London, said: “It seems to me very unlikely that the association is causal.”She said the study did not “get us any further since it does not present a convincing mechanism by which pollutants could affect the developing brain to result in autism”. One of the challenges with this style of study is that it is difficult to account for every aspect of life which might affect the probability of developing autism, such as family history.It means the study cannot say that autism is caused by traffic pollution, merely that there could be a link between the two. Sophia Xiang Sun, from the University of Cambridge’s autism research centre, argued that cutting pollution would be a good idea anyway.“We know that traffic-related air pollution can contribute to many other diseases and conditions, and it is biologically plausible it also has a role in pathways of autism. “However, whether or not the potential association between autism and traffic-related air pollution exists, reduction of traffic-related air pollution would be good for public health.”By James Gallagher, Health and science reporter, BBC News Share Sharecenter_img HealthLifestyle Autism: Traffic pollution linked, study suggests by: – November 27, 2012 Tweet Sharing is caring!last_img read more

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Healy’s world-record knock leads Aussies to sweep

first_imgAUSTRALIA opener Alyssa Healy hit the highest score in women’s Twenty20 internationals with an unbeaten 148 off 61 balls in victory over Sri Lanka.The wicketkeeper, 29, beat the previous mark of 133 not out set by team-mate Meg Lanning against England in July.Healy struck 19 fours and seven sixes, bringing up her century off 46 balls as the hosts posted 226-2 in Sydney.After Sri Lanka could make only 94-7 in reply, Australia won by 132 runs to secure a 3-0 series whitewash.Healy’s maiden T20 century in her 101st appearance in the format is the fastest by an Australian, and second only in the women’s game to West Indian Deandra Dottin’s 38-ball ton against South Africa in 2010.Her 148 is the fourth-highest individual score in all T20 internationals, behind compatriot Aaron Finch’s 172 against Zimbabwe in 2018, Afghanistan’s Hazratullah Zazai 162 against Ireland in February and Finch’s 156 against England in 2013.Australia’s margin of victory is their biggest in women’s T20 internationals and 10th biggest of all time. (BBC Sport)last_img read more

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