Video: Nick Saban, Miss Terry Arrive At Alabama’s Parade In Style

first_imgNick Saban smiling during a press conference.MIAMI GARDENS, FL – JANUARY 05: Head coach Nick Saban of the Alabama Crimson Tide speaks to the media during Media Day ahead of the Discover BCS National Championship at Sun Life Stadium on January 5, 2013 in Miami Gardens, Florida. (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)Despite the cold weather, Alabama’s national championship celebration and parade are going on as scheduled this Saturday. In fact, the man of the hour just arrived.According to a number of reporters and fans on-scene, Saban and his wife, Miss Terry, arrived at Bryant-Denny Stadium in a black Mercedes SL 550 convertible, motorcade-style. Mr. and Mrs. Nick Saban in #Tuscaloosa #RollTide https://t.co/rmP3Qq0RB2 pic.twitter.com/WJmfd3uCl1— ABC 33/40 News (@abc3340) January 23, 2016An elated Nick Saban at the CFB championship parade today. pic.twitter.com/IVylap5HI8— Ascot Friday (@Ascot_Friday) January 23, 2016Nick Saban and Miss Terry are here pic.twitter.com/V01uPFm5Jo— Marq Burnett (@Marq_Burnett) January 23, 2016Nick Saban concludes the parade. https://t.co/LD6RnCn0bS— Charlie Potter (@Charlie_Potter) January 23, 2016No, Saban doesn’t look thrilled – he’s probably upset that he isn’t out recruiting for next year. But you know he’s smiling on the inside.last_img read more

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Fort Nelson vandalism at the Demonstration Forest

first_imgFORT NELSON, B.C. – While Municipal staff were conducting routine maintenance at the Demonstration Forest, the staff uncovered a potentially hazardous electrical situation.Staff noticed the boxes attached to power poles had their locks removed and a ‘pigtail’ device was connected to one of the boxes.Unauthorized accessing of power is an extremely unsafe activity which poses a danger both to the perpetrators and other residents using the area for regular recreation shared the Municipality. Repairs are underway to the boxes and the Municipality wants the public to know when damage is done to public property it affects many people. They suggest discouraging those you see about to damage something and to report those who have damaged property.The Municipality is reminding residents to protect the community from the few who choose to put others at risk and incur costs to taxpayers.If you have information about the person(s) who were involved in this or any other act of vandalism to community property, you can report tips anonymously to the RCMP Crime Stoppers tip line at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477) or complete and submit the online tip form.last_img read more

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Northern BC murder victims sister accuses fugitives dad of failing to take

first_imgThe sister of murder victim Chynna Deese said on Facebook that Alan Schmegelsky isn’t “cut from the same cloth” as her family and that he doesn’t acknowledge his own hand in his child’s upbringing and demise.The sister of an American tourist says the father of one of the B.C. men named as a suspect in the woman’s death isn’t accepting his share of responsibility for her family’s sorrow.Kennedy Deese, whose sister Chynna Deese was found dead along with her Australian boyfriend Lucas Fowler near a highway in northern British Columbia in mid-July, posted a statement to Facebook on Saturday accusing Alan Schmegelsky of playing the victim. “It hurts a lot. He was my only child. I’ll never get to hug him again. I’ll never get to tease him again. I’ll never get to spend a minute with him again.”“At least I know where he is. His troubles are over.”When reached via Facebook Messenger on Sunday and asked about his response to Deese’s post, Schmegelsky said she could go on “60 Minutes” and that he could arrange it.“I manned up. I have nothing to hide,” he wrote.While police were still hunting for the pair, Schmegelsky sent a 132-page book to reporters about his own life. He described it as a novelization of his son’s troubled life and his numerous encounters with police and courts and said he wanted to highlight how what he called a “broken system” shaped him and Bryer.Kennedy Deese shot back that her own family suffered challenges, but doesn’t “play the victim of a broken system.”“There is no white flag of surrender for my family. We are not defeated by divorce, mental health, violence, poverty and socioeconomic constraints, domestic disputes, alcohol or drugs, social media and bullying, feelings of loneliness, or disparities,” Deese wrote, noting that her sister rose to become the first generation of her immediate family to go to college.“We have the courage to ask for and offer help. We are strong, and stand strong together right now in the face of all of these adversities that have come upon us.”RCMP Assistant Commissioner Kevin Hackett told a news conference Wednesday that determining a motive will be “extremely difficult” if the identities are confirmed through autopsies because investigators can’t interview Schmegelsky or McLeod.He did not commit to providing details of the ongoing investigation. The two men were named as suspects in the deaths of Deese and Fowler, and were charged with second-degree murder in the killing of Leonard Dyck, a university lecturer from Vancouver.Alan Schmegelsky told Australia’s “60 Minutes” TV program late last week that he won’t believe his son is a murderer until he gets facts, saying he knows how the families of the victims feel.“I’m so sorry for what’s happened. Whether it’s my son or whether it’s something else, we don’t know. I have just lost my son. I know exactly how you feel,” Schmegelsky told the program.center_img Deese also said Schmegelsky isn’t “cut from the same cloth” as her family, and that he doesn’t acknowledge his own hand in his child’s upbringing and ultimate demise.“Your sorrow is for yourself. You cannot relate to us, as we had no doings in the cause of your pain when you’ve played a part in the cause of our pain,” Deese wrote.“To the murderers and their family, the appropriate action when mistakes are made is taking responsibility. The proper public response would have been a genuine apology. But we still forgive you and have mercy.”RCMP said Wednesday they believe they’ve found the bodies of Kam McLeod, 19, and Bryer Schmegelsky, 18, of Port Alberni in dense brush in northern Manitoba following a massive manhunt that lasted close to two weeks.Police have said they’re waiting for the results of an autopsy before confirming the identities.last_img read more

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From doctors across borders

first_imgOnce again, India and Pakistan stood at the brink of war over Kashmir, and have only just begun to tone down the posturing and threats. With nuclear weapons uncomfortably close at hand, almost 2 billion people in the region face the risk of nuclear catastrophe. For well over three decades now, multiple simulations and projections have suggested that an India–Pakistan nuclear escalation could lead to millions of deaths in the region, rivaling past great famines. The consequences of a nuclear exchange of any magnitude could affect generations to come. Kashmir has proved to be an especially intractable political predicament for the two countries. As Arundhati Roy wrote in her 2017 novel, The Ministry of Utmost Happiness, the confrontation over Kashmir is “a perfect war—a war that can never be won or lost, a war without end”. Also Read – A special kind of bondThe threat of war is a matter of urgent public health concern. Health workers have a duty to speak out and plead for peace. Why would these two populous and proud nations risk disaster by such brinksmanship? The region is one of the poorest in the world with human development ranking for India and Pakistan standing at 130 and 150, respectively, in 2018. An estimated 40 per cent (59 million) of the world’s stunted children and 53 per cent (27 million) of all wasted children live in south Asia, and 34 per cent of the population has no access to sanitation. Investments in health and education remain less than 4 per cent and 3 per cent of respective gross domestic product (GDP) in the region. Yet successive governments and military establishments have escalated military spending—in 2017, it was US$64 billion in India and $11 billion in Pakistan. Also Read – Insider threat managementPerhaps the greatest disappointment is the jingoism and warmongering that have gripped both countries, with some reckless parts of the media baying for blood. We have witnessed almost hysterical calls for retribution after the deplorable suicide bombing in Pulwama, Kashmir, on Feb 14, 2019, that killed 40 Indian soldiers. Perhaps the current escalation of air and ground skirmishes along the military Line of Control (the de facto India–Pakistan border) was inevitable. But civil society representatives and activists have been silenced. Contrarian views, including calls for peace, have been ridiculed and shouted down. With the release by Pakistan of the downed Indian air force pilot on March 1, 2019, temperatures have begun to cool somewhat, yet the situation remains extremely tense. We call upon the governments, political parties, mass media, and civil society in India and Pakistan to step back from the edge of conflict and to exercise constraint. The real causes of conflict in the region—important contributing factors to instability and the rise of extremism—include rampant poverty, inequalities, illiteracy, and lack of investment in human capital. Pakistan has lost more than 60 000 lives in fighting domestic terrorism in its tribal areas and Baluchistan, costing its economy at least $120 billion. Economic losses to the region are massive and simply unsustainable. It has been estimated that an additional terrorist incident per million persons reduces GDP per capita growth by about 1.5 per cent. These resources could have been spent on human development, religious harmony, and the promotion of grassroots democracy. Political leaders in both countries must move away from conflict and pursue diplomacy, dialogue, and the promotion of person to person contact and engagement between civil society representatives and youth. There is no conflict that cannot be resolved at the negotiating table. As the two countries once again stare into an abyss of disaster, we fervently call for peace, pragmatism, and the prevention of further violence. (The authors are: Dr. Arun Mitra, Vice President, Indian Doctors for Peace and Development; Zulfiqar A Bhutta, Center of Excellence in Women and Child Health, The Aga Khan University, Karachi 75500, Pakistan (ZAB); and Dr. Arun Mitra, Zulfiqar A Bhutta and Richard Horton, The Lancet, London, UK (RH). The views expressed are strictly personal)last_img read more

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A metaphor for capitalism

first_imgIs there a Marxist position on fashion? Maybe not a “position” as such – though some Marxists have also been notable fashionistas (and others, distinctly scruffy dressers). However, a Marxist approach can reveal quite a lot. Fashion is (arguably) unique to and a characteristic of our species. Some other creatures adorn, advertise, or conceal themselves by “wearing foreign objects.” But in no case (as far as is known) is there any significant social transmission or evolution of habit. And clothing – its wearing and manufacture – is peculiar to humanity. Also Read – A special kind of bondHuman self-ornamentation goes back a long way. Anthropologists have speculated on its social purpose but, while materials or ornaments depend on what is locally available or can be procured from further afield, only in very few cases is there any clear evidence of the environmental or functional determination of the precise detail of body adornment. In other words, this seems to be just “fashion.” This seems likely to have been the case also for most of human history. With the emergence of class societies, including slavery and feudalism, fashion took on a new role, as a marker of social status. Different professions or craft guilds – from clergy to cobbler – distinguished and identified themselves through dress. Sometimes, as in royal courts from Ancient Regime France to Regency Britain, this could take an extreme form. The dress became an essential element of the “rules of behaviour” – emphasising and maintaining social distinctions. But within capitalism, fashion takes on a whole new character. Marx saw fashion as a dynamo as well as a product of capitalism. Clothing was central to the industrial revolution; textile manufacture inaugurated the factory system in Britain with adults and children labouring in appalling conditions spinning cloth made from cotton produced by slaves on the other side of the Atlantic. The market for the product was driven not just by need, but by fashion. Also Read – Insider threat managementEsther Leslie, a Marxist analyst of modern culture, describes how Marx saw fashion as a metaphor for capitalism. In Capital, Marx wrote of “the murderous, meaningless caprices of fashion” linked to the general anarchy of capitalist production. Capitalism requires constant novelty – not just in the mode of production, but in products themselves – in order to maintain sales and profits. Alongside “normal” business cycles and changes due to external factors such as the weather, “fashion, and the sudden placing of large orders that have to be executed in the shortest possible time” leads to precarious work; periods of “inhuman toil” alternating with starvation – a situation which intensified with the development of railways and telegraphs. Marx quotes a manufacturer whose customers travel every fortnight from Glasgow, Manchester, and Edinburgh to the wholesale warehouses supplied by his factory “and give small orders requiring immediate execution, instead of buying from stock as they used to do.” Not much has changed – except that the production process has been globalised and is dominated by finance capital. Its excesses are manifested in episodes such as the collapse of Rana Plaza factory in Bangladesh in 2013, where in appalling conditions and on starvation wages, workers sweated producing fashion items for Benetton, The Children’s Place, Cato Fashions, Joe Fresh, and Walmart. Some 1,134 garment workers were killed and 2,500 maimed. Clothing accounts for 79 per cent of total exports from Bangladesh; 43 per cent of US clothing workers are paid below the minimum wage and illegal low pay and long hours are rife in the British textile industry. Fashion is not only exploitative of people; it is hugely destructive of the planet. Agrochemicals – pesticides and fertilisers – account for 77 per cent of the cost of raw cotton production in Kenya. Critics point to the way that expensive haute couture is inseparable from the wasteful and exploitative mass production and consumption of “cheap” fashion items, worn for a short time and then discarded. And fashion has, in parallel with and intimately connected to its economic role as a vehicle for profit and exploitation, a cultural and ideological function. Marx had a particular reason to be aware of the distinctions of dress. Having often had to pawn his own coat, he could not gain admittance to the British Library without redeeming it. Its use-value was not just keeping Marx warm; it was also a signifier of respectability without which he would have been denied access. Marx gave the name “rag-proletariat” (lumpenproletariat) to the poorest sections of the working class, immediately identifiable by their clothing. “White-collar” workers don’t get their hands – or clothes – dirty. They signify their distance from manual workers in their dress. Dress remains a signifier of social class distinctions and is sometimes inverted; the practice of going without a tie (or often, even a collar), unheard of a few decades ago, is normal among academics and increasingly tolerated among financial executives; it is often the lowest-paid workers (security, attendants) who are required to wear a uniform. Ironically, the dress is becoming a marker of prestige and power between institutions as well as within them. As Julie Burchill declared: “Satellites preen, superpowers dress down.” Fashion is not just clothes. All fashion has its “derivatives” – shoes, bags, and accessories, which are great profit makers. Plus, of course, the multibillion-dollar hair and beauty product industry. Tansy Hoskins, in her book Stitched Up: The Anti-Capitalist Book of Fashion, shows how capitalism “stitches up” its consumers as well as its workers and its raw materials – today not just in clothing but in pretty much every other commodity imaginable, from cars to the latest iPhone or other “must-have.” Fashion is central to capitalism’s underlying philosophy of “planned obsolescence” – the “systematic attempt of business to make us wasteful, debt-ridden, permanently discontented individuals.” And it is central also to capitalism’s ability (so far) to ride out its crises by super-exploitation of both workers and consumers. Fashion is the ultimate vehicle for alienation, reification, and commodity fetishism, persuading us to think that we “belong” – when we don’t – or to think that we’re “different” – when we’re not. “Fashion is a total system” and, says Leslie, far from being an aberration, it is at the core of capitalism and provides “a lens through which to explore it.” Hoskins declares: “As an illustration of how capitalism operates, fashion is perfect. Inequality and exploitation are straight out of the past. “Just as Queen Victoria wore dresses stitched by seamstresses who went blind in the candlelight, so today’s society it-girls now wear dresses stitched by Romanian sweatshop workers paid 99 pence an hour.” Fashion allows exploitation to pretend to be something else, when in fact the beating heart of the fashion industry is not creativity but profit. “To understand this, you need to look no further than the writings of Marx and Engels, more than a century ago.” Today, fashion attempts “to persuade us to buy things we don’t need with money we don’t have produced by people and processes we prefer not to think about, to create impressions that won’t last on people we don’t know.” Under socialism, it is likely there will continue to be “fashions” – in dress and in much else. Some of us may still remain “dedicated followers of fashion.” But fashion will no longer be dictated by the owners and managers of capital and subordinated to profit.(Courtesy: Morning Star. The source of this article is Marx Memorial Library)last_img read more

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Truck mows down TMC activists on NH60

first_imgKolkata: Two Trinamool Congress activists were killed in a tragic accident on National Highway 60 at Hasnabad in North 24-Parganas, on Monday morning.The incident caused traffic congestion in the area for some time. The situation was later brought under control by the local police. The victims, identified as Lalan Prasad and D Murli, were riding a motorcycle when a speeding truck hit them from behind. Police said that the victims were crossing the road on the motorcycle when the truck driver lost control over the vehicle and mowed them down. He then managed to flee from the spot along with the vehicle, immediately after the incident. It has been learnt that the victims were going to join an election rally of Trinamool Congress. Some of the local residents tried to intercept the vehicle but failed to do so as the driver sped up. Tension gripped the local residents after the incident, many of whom staged protest against the reckless driving of goods vehicles along the National Highway. The local residents rushed the injured victims to a nearby hospital, where the doctors pronounced them brought dead. They had critical injuries in various parts of their bodies. Vehicles plying through the area remained stranded for nearly half an hour as an agitated mob staged demonstration on the road. Police assured the local residents that surveillance would be conducted to check the vehicles that flout the traffic norms. Senior police officers later reached the spot and pacified the mob. They brought the situation under control. Traffic movement was restored soon as well. Police have subsequently started a detailed probe into the incident. They are also investigating to ascertain if there was any foulplay involved in the incident. Raids are being conducted to nab the truck driver.last_img read more

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Ohio State releases week 1 depth chart

An Ohio State football spokesman tweeted out the team’s week one depth chart Wednesday afternoon, but a few questions still remain about pending position battles.The Buckeyes are scheduled to take on Navy Saturday at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore. Kickoff is set for noon.Credit: Courtesy of OSU Athletics

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Football 5 plays that mattered in Ohio States 387 win over Army

Ohio State redshirt senior quarterback J.T. Barrett (16) throws a pass in the first quarter of the 2017 OSU- Army game on Sep. 16. OSU won 38-7. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorEach game, the momentum can shift from one team to the other on one play. Every week, we will list five plays, elements of plays or series of plays that made the most significant impact in Ohio State’s games. Here’s the five plays that mattered most in No. 8 Ohio State’s 38-7 win versus Army.Barrett’s 107th career touchdownQuarterback J.T. Barrett etched his name further into history Saturday with his fourth-quarter touchdown pass to sophomore wide receiver Austin Mack.The 9-yard strike with 7:01 remaining in the game was touchdown No. 107 for Barrett, surpassing former Purdue quarterback and eventual NFL Hall of Famer Drew Brees on the Big Ten’s all-time touchdowns responsible for list.Barrett finished the game 25-for-33 for 270 yards and two touchdowns through the air, with 41 yards and a touchdown coming on the ground.Ohio State redshirt senior quarterback J.T. Barrett (16) catches a snap in the fourth quarter of the 2017 OSU- Army game on Sep. 16. OSU won 38-7. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorErick Smith’s touchdown-saving pass breakupAs expected, Army’s triple-option style offense didn’t put the ball in the air much Saturday. However, with 10:24 remaining in the second quarter, Army quarterback Ahmad Bradshaw fooled Ohio State’s defense and went long to running back Kell Walker who had no one in front of him.Senior safety Erick Smith ran from the left side of the field, dove and batted away a would-be touchdown. The play was reminiscent of the athleticism former safety Malik Hooker showed last season.Dobbins, two plays for 74 yardsOhio State freshman running back J.K. Dobbins had just two carries in the second quarter compared to five carries for 50 yards in the first. When his number was called in the third, he put the game out of reach.Ohio State freshman running back J.K. Dobbins (2) runs the ball in for a touchdown in the third quarter of the 2017 OSU- Army game in Ohio Stadium on Sep. 16. OSU won 38-7. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorWith 8:23 remaining in the third quarter on the Buckeyes’ first drive of the second half, Dobbins turned on the jets for a 52-yard touchdown after unleashing a devastating juke move to get into the open field. The score put Ohio State up 24-7 and was set up by a Dobbins 22-yard gain on the play prior.18-play, 99-yard, 9:37 Army touchdown driveOhio State gained 204 yards in the first quarter and led 14-0 after 15 minutes. It was clear that Army would have to limit the Buckeyes’ possessions if it wanted to keep the score close. In the second quarter, Ohio State had just one drive that ended with three points due to Army’s 18-play, 99-yard touchdown drive that spanned nearly 10 minutes.The triple-option offense allows a team to have long drives and wear out opposing defenses. Eighteen consecutive plays will tire any defense, and Army’s long, methodical drive was the reason why the game was only a 10-point difference at halftime.Third-down stop results in Army missed field goalArmy began the second half with the ball and drove all the way to Ohio State’s 23-yard line. A touchdown would have cut the game to just three points, but the Ohio State defense made a stand.On the 10th play of a six-minute drive, safeties Damon Webb and Jordan Fuller played in the box and attacked the backfield, dropping running back Darnell Woolfolk for a 3-yard loss on third-and-3. The next play, Army kicker Blake Wilson missed left on a 43-yard field goal try, which kept the score 17-7.Two plays later, Dobbins found paydirt for the decisive score. read more

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Football Flaws in pass defense exposed once again prove fatal in Ohio

Ohio State junior cornerback Denzel Ward (12) breaks up an Iowa pass in the second quarter of the Ohio State-Iowa game on Nov. 4. Ohio State lost 24-55. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorIOWA CITY, Iowa — Through its first two games of the season, No. 6 Ohio State (7-2, 5-1 Big Ten) had allowed the most passing yards per game of any team in the nation with 403, after being torched in back-to-back weeks by Indiana and Oklahoma.Several weeks after that against lackluster opponents and a surprising shutdown performance of Penn State quarterback Trace McSorley seemed to quiet the concerns many had about the pass defense.Those concerns re-emerged in the first half of Ohio State’s game against Iowa as the Buckeyes allowed Iowa quarterback Nathan Stanley to throw for 162 yards and three touchdown passes to put the Hawkeyes up 31-17.No improvements were made in the second half as Stanley continued picked apart the Buckeyes as he finished the game going 20-for-31 with 226 yards and five touchdown passes, effectively ending any championship hopes Ohio State had heading into the matchup.Ohio State head coach Urban Meyer appeared disappointed in his team’s effort defensively, but had no immediate answer for the struggles. “After I visit with the defensive staff, that’s just right now the game just ended, so I don’t have any answers for you right now,” Meyer said.From the beginning, Stanley seemed to have all the answers Iowa needed. The pocket-passing quarterback seemingly found no issue picking apart Ohio State’s secondary as he found his tight ends wide open on seam routes across the middle of the field and worked play-action passes to perfection to throw off the defense.The play that seemed most prevalent and most effective against Ohio State proved to be the play-action passes with Stanley rolling out of the pocket. The secondary often bit the play-fakes and lost a step in coverage to receivers, who would often run corner routes, and surrendered big plays.Stanley finished the game with seven passes for 15-plus yards. He entered the game completing 57.5 percent of his passes, but finished with a 64.5 completion percentage. The Ohio State defense had just three pass break-ups, and one of those was from defensive tackle Dre’Mont Jones. Though much of the blame deserves to be levied upon the secondary, the defensive line struggled to apply ample pressure to Stanley. Ohio State finished with just one sack in the game, and any time pressure was applied, Stanley was able to get the ball out quick enough or roll out of pressure to avoid being taken down. Redshirt senior defensive end Tyquan Lewis said the defensive line did not do enough to stop Stanley, and should have applied more pressure to aid the defensive backs in defending against the pass.“I just say, the defensive linemen, that’s on us,” Lewis said. “Pass rush has to get home. We’ve got to sack the quarterback. That’s our job. Disrupt the pass, that’s on us.”Lewis said the team allowed Stanley to get too comfortable in the pocket, and the inability to pressure the quarterback frequently enough allowed him to complete passes easier or effectively escape the pocket and make a play outside the pocket.“Given how quick [Stanley was releasing the ball], or most of the time, should definitely have to get home and affect the passing,” Lewis said. “And that’s the main thing when it’s a passing situation. Trying to find ways to affect the passer and getting the pass rush home, getting sacks. That’s the main goal. He stood in the pocket a few times.”The issues of the passing defense have been prevalent all season. For the most part, the defensive line has not been at the root of the problems, and it wasn’t Saturday. However, the letdown performance by the line prevented it from bailing out the struggles of the secondary as it had earlier in the season. The struggles of Ohio State against the pass is nothing new. It was just exposed again Saturday. read more

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Fabbricini Roberto Mancini ideal manager for Italy but…

first_imgFIGC commissioner Roberto Fabbricini says that Roberto Mancini is the ‘ideal’ manager for Italy national team but the federation needs changes.Mancini will be in charge of his first competitive game when Italy plays Poland on September 6.Fabbricini gave his verdict on Mancini and on the current state of the Italy football federation. Football Italia reports.“I can’t make predictions about what will happen,” Roberto Fabbricini said.“The Serie B club captains are due to meet, and it would seem strange to me if a strike did happen due to the solidarity of all 19 teams, who unanimously asked me not to readmit teams.“Players are obviously free to make their own minds up, but a strike would certainly not be good for Italian football.“I think the big task facing the next federal council will be to reform the Leagues. The current format is crying out for it and as it stands, the system isn’t sustainableCristiano Ronaldo, JuventusSerie A Betting: Match-day 3 Stuart Heath – September 14, 2019 Considering there is a number of perfect starts so early in the Serie A season, as well as a few surprisingly not-so perfect ones….“Several glorious clubs have disappeared in the space of a few months, so it’s necessary to find an FIGC President who is able to govern our world well.“At the moment, it seems more like a confederation rather than a federation. There are often too many conflicting interests, every measure we take seems to annoy someone.“However, electing a President isn’t enough on its own. We must have the strength to make the necessary changes to this system.“Never has Italy been so low in the rankings, but I think Roberto Mancini has the ideal characteristics to coach the national team, which are enthusiasm, competence and charisma.“I saw him work in the two friendlies before the summer with balance, initiative and a great dialogue with the team.“Now we have some important games coming up, which are worth three points. We must start on the right foot.”last_img read more

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