Love delivers for Utah State in 59-28 win over UNLV

first_img Tags: Football/Jordan Love/Mountain West/Utah State Aggies October 13, 2018 /Sports News – Local Love delivers for Utah State in 59-28 win over UNLV Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailLOGAN, Utah (AP) — Jordan Love passed for 322 yards and five touchdowns, including four in a dominant first half, and Utah State rolled to a 59-28 victory over UNLV in Mountain West Conference play on Saturday.After Lexington Thomas’ 1-yard TD plunged staked UNLV to an early 7-0 lead, Love took over. He connected with Jordan Nathan for a 24-yard TD to knot the score and gave the Aggies (5-1, 2-0) a lead they wouldn’t relinquish with an 80-yard scoring strike to Jalen Greene. Love sandwiched TD passes of 26 yards to Savon Scarver and 7 yards to Ron’quavion Tarver around Baron Gajkowski 16-yard return of a blocked punt and Darwin Thompson’s 7-yard TD run for a 42-7 halftime lead. Love threw just three passes in the third quarter, including his final TD toss — a 29-yarder to Tarver — before sitting out the rest of the game.Dominik Eberle booted a 24-yard field goal and Henry Colombi added a 37-yard TD run to cap the scoring for the Aggies. Greene finished with five catches for 132 yards.Max Gilliam threw for 250 yards and three TDs for the Runnin’ Rebels (2-4, 0-2).Utah State piled up 598 yards of offense. Associated Presslast_img read more

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GREAT ANTIDOTES FOR BLOATED EGOS

first_img“It’s like drinking from a fire hose. It’s overwhelming,” says Nate Beeler, a conservative staff cartoonist with The Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch, whose work also is distributed by Cagle Cartoons.“You can’t keep up,” says Adam Zyglis, who draws five cartoons a week for The Buffalo (NY) News and is the president of the Association of American Editorial Cartoonists. “You have to prioritize. You could easily do two, three, maybe more cartoons a day.”And on the receiving end of this avalanche of cartoons are the nation’s opinion editors, who often struggle to give political “balance” to the commentary they present to their readers.In emails and calls to their colleagues, editors have been searching for conservative – yes, especially pro-Trump – columnists and cartoonists. Some also are looking for columnists to explain how the largely ignored people who live in the fly-over states were able to surprise all those “brilliant” political pundits by electing Trump.Editors are looking for the Holy Grail of “balance” for their pages. And the job is made tougher in this Trump era by 2016 voters handing control of Congress, as well as the White House, to the Republican Party.“Power corrupts, no matter who is in power,” says the conservative Beeler, explaining that it is his job “to take on people in power.” And with few exceptions, those people will be the Republican politicians, who now have absolute power.This imbalance has happened before, when absolute political power has shifted to one political party or another after an election. But it seldom lasts. Usually within an election cycle or two, fickle voters return to divided government, splitting up power between parties in Congress and the White House.But in the meantime, the life of an opinion editor can be pure hell, with readers screaming about what they perceive is bias in the newspaper’s sometimes lopsided criticism of those in power.Good luck achieving some ideal concept of balance in an opinion section, when there is little balance of power in the halls of government. And with the election of Trump, there is also no shortage of criticism.The president’s critics are not confined just to the Democrats, snotty cartoonists and the “dishonest media.” They include many people in his own political party.With Trump showing no signs of mellowing and a small group of advisors in the White House egging him on, the fire-hose-flow of controversies shows no sign of abating, and neither does the flow of cartoons that criticize and ridicule the president.During last summer’s presidential campaign, Daryl Cagle, a cartoonist, who worked for more than a decade drawing The Muppets, and was later on the staff of The Honolulu Advertiser and MSNBC before creating his Cagle Cartoons syndicate, wrote prophetically about how a Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton administration would look in cartoons.“Cartooning is a negative art and a supportive cartoon is a lousy cartoon. Hillary is a rich character that we have known for decades. There is a grand history with Hillary and Bill Clinton that gives us many more clichés for a broader cartoon palette.“If Trump loses in November, we should enjoy four years of great Hillary cartoons. If Trump wins in November, the Trump-monster cartoon-apocalypse will continue. God save us.”And, indeed, it has continued. In fact, Trump seems to be invigorating cartoonists.“We have a newfound mission,” Zyglis says. “What we do is important. It always has been. But there is more immediacy today. This is a time we are needed the most.”“Editorial cartooning becomes more important as democratic institutions are threatened,” Zyglis says, noting the insults Trump throws at just about every institution that stands in his ways, including the courts, intelligence agencies and news media.“It is clear how much he despises the media. And in authoritarian regimes, satire is the first target. Look how ‘Saturday Night Live’ gets under Trump’s skin. An editorial cartoon is just a single panel form of a ‘Saturday Night Live’ skit.”But Beeler is confident his colleagues will stand strong and prevail against Trump’s attacks because “editorial cartoons are great antidotes to bloated egos.” GREAT ANTIDOTES FOR BLOATED EGOSBy  Dianne HardistyYou can almost hear the screams of editorial page editors: “Find me a pro-Trump cartoonist!”Good luck finding a “pro-Trump” cartoonist of any political stripe, including conservative, these days.“A real editorial cartoonist is not pro-anything,” explains Rick McKee, a staff cartoonist with The Augusta (Ga.) Chronicle. His work is distributed to hundreds of newspapers around the country by the Cagle Cartoons syndicate.“Editorial cartooning is a negative art. You may be more supportive of a certain point of view. But it’s criticism. You don’t want to be a cheerleader for any particular politician,” says McKee, who takes a conservative approach to most political issues.Since Donald Trump was sworn in as president in January, editorial cartooning has kicked into high gear. And the new president’s combative nature, compulsive tweeting, political stumbles and thin skin have been the gifts that keep on giving to the nation’s cartoonists. FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Smashing Pumpkins Announce Extensive Summer Reunion Tour

first_imgOver the past few weeks, Smashing Pumpkins began formally teasing the idea of a reunion tour. Earlier this week, the band launched an official countdown clock, with many speculating the clock was counting down to the new tour’s announcement. Though much of this week was marred by the back-and-forth between frontman Billy Corgan and original bassist D’arcy Wretzky, who has informed a number of outlets that she was purposefully excluded from the reunion, today, Smashing Pumpkins announced their “Shiny And Oh So Bright” tour.For the “Shiny And Oh So Bright” tour, the majority of the founding members of Smashing Pumpkins—save Wretzky—as well as the band’s current longtime guitarist, Jeff Schroeder, will hit the road together and celebrate the band’s first five albums: Gish, Siamese Dream, Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness, Adore, and Machina.The band has announced an expansive list of dates for the new tour, which range from July 12th through September 7th. The tour will take the band across the United States during its two months, with a quick dip into Canada at the start of August. Tickets go on sale on Friday, February 23rd, at 10 a.m. (local), and are available on Smashing Pumpkins’ website.last_img read more

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A new take on Title IX

first_imgGAZETTE: What are some of the other major changes you and your colleagues have worked hard to implement over the summer?MERHILL: One that a lot of individuals are concerned with is the new requirement that colleges and universities provide live hearings when instances of sexual misconduct are reported. Advisers for both parties must be allowed to engage in cross-examination of the parties, witnesses, and advisers during these hearings. This marks a very big change. There were a lot of questions to consider — how do you protect the privacy, and safety, of the parties involved under this new model? Who is going to preside over these hearings — will they be University officials or representatives from outside the University? We’re already at work on building a space for these hearings in the Smith Campus Center that will be designed to preserve the safety and privacy of community members involved in the filing of a complaint of misconduct.GAZETTE: The DOE has also changed the standard of evidence that can be used in investigations of sexual misconduct, has it not?MERHILL: Yes. Previous federal guidance mandated that colleges and universities use a “preponderance of the evidence” standard in determining responsibility during the investigation of formal complaints involving sexual harassment and assault. The new Title IX regulations afford institutions the flexibility to choose either a “preponderance of the evidence” or “clear and convincing” standard. In short, “clear and convincing” requires a higher burden of proof.During our conversations with academic leadership, students, faculty, and staff this summer, the overwhelming response was for us to maintain the “preponderance of the evidence” standard in our procedures for formal complaints of sexual harassment and misconduct, and this is what we are going to do.GAZETTE: What are some of the other prevailing decision points that community members helped you navigate over the summer?MERHILL: Let me reiterate just how appreciative I am for all of the thoughtfulness, care, and patience of all of those who have worked with us over the previous few months. There have been many. One example which I already briefly touched upon has to do with identifying who should serve as the decision-maker in a live hearing. Would we have a single hearing decision-maker or multiple ones, would it be made up of individuals internal to the University, or persons external?What we heard from people is that it would be beneficial to have some internal individuals who are familiar with the culture and structures at Harvard, along with some external to Harvard. We also heard pretty much unanimously from community members that we should have a panel as opposed to a single decision-maker. Based on this input, Harvard will adopt a hybrid panel of two individuals from a list of trained administrators and faculty, and one person from a list of external attorneys.Another point of decision-making was around the responsible-employee model. Prior to the new rules, and according to Harvard policy, any staff or faculty member who receives notice of harassment, meaning either if someone actually comes to them with a concern, or they’re aware of a potential concern within their community more broadly, is required to share that concern with either a Title IX resource within their School or unit, or with the University Title IX Office. The new Title IX regulations no longer follow the responsible-employee model, and instead identify a much smaller group of individuals as responsible for sharing concerns with Title IX. In meeting with community members throughout this summer we heard, again overwhelmingly, that community members want Harvard to keep this model in place. Again, based on this feedback, the responsible-employee model will remain across both of our new policies.GAZETTE: What can community members do if they’d like to learn more about, or offer input regarding, the interim policies over the coming year?MERHILL: It’s important that everyone at Harvard knows that all existing Title IX resources, including those related to training and support, reporting, and investigations, remain in place, even during the difficult times of this pandemic. School and unit Title IX Resource Coordinators remain the primary points of contact for students, staff, and faculty, including for the provision of supportive measures. Title IX trainings, including bystander-intervention training, trainings around gender inclusivity and other topics, continue to happen, along with updates on what is changing with Title IX rules and in the world. An example: Updates to training modules actually now also include an example of harassment on Zoom. We have new prevention initiatives online that individuals can access via our website. Anonymous online reporting still exists. And ODR continues to be able to receive, and investigate, formal complaints — they have long been able to do so, and had remote processes in place long before the spread of the coronavirus.I’d encourage everyone to read our At-a-Glance document for a quick overview of the changes to Harvard’s policies and procedures on sexual harassment and misconduct. As President [Larry] Bacow has said in the past, all of us at Harvard have a role to play in ensuring that each of us who calls this University home feels welcome, and safe. We’re grateful for the opportunity to engage with so many caring and thoughtful individuals across Harvard’s Schools and units. Today, new U.S. Department of Education (DOE) rules on Title IX, the law that prohibits sex discrimination in schools that receive federal funds, took effect. In order to comply with the new federal regulations, Harvard has implemented interim policies and procedures. The Gazette spoke with Title IX coordinator Nicole Merhill to discuss what has changed and how the University was able to implement these changes in the very short timeline set forth by the DOE, with the input of community members across Harvard.Q&ANicole MerhillGAZETTE: Would you provide some of the context around the U.S. Department of Education’s decision to issue new Title IX rules?MERHILL: In November of 2018, the DOE published proposed amendments to the Title IX regulations, specifically as applied to sexual harassment, including sexual assault and sexual violence, at elementary, secondary, and post-secondary institutions.Consistent with the rule-making process, individuals were invited to comment on the proposed regulations. Ultimately, the department received over 120,000 comments, which they were then required to review and consider. This process took over a year and a half and resulted in approximately 2,000 pages of preamble to the final rules themselves, where the department responded to the comments and concerns that were raised during this comment period. The final Title IX regulations, published in May 2020, go into effect Aug. 14, 2020, which means all Title IX policies and procedures must be updated to reflect the new regulations by Aug. 14, 2020. Which brings us to today.GAZETTE:  That sounds like a quick timeline for implementation.MERHILL: It is. The DOE gave 70 working days to read and understand a document with more than 2,000 pages and then to implement changes corresponding to that document. By comparison, in October 2014, the DOE published the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) amendments to the Clery Act, and afforded institutions nearly nine months (until July 2015) to make changes to ensure compliance with the new amendments. That’s a big difference to begin with and the changes to the Title IX regulations are far more expansive than those included in the VAWA amendments. And now, we find ourselves in the midst of a pandemic, with the vast majority of our community members in remote settings, which makes it even more challenging. Of course, we deeply value the input of Harvard’s students, faculty, and staff, and without it, it would be next to impossible to navigate the critical decisions we’ve been forced to make with regard to changing our rules and regulations on Title IX.GAZETTE:  Yet here we are. Our new Title IX policies and procedures must take effect today, according to federal law. How was the University able to put together these new rules and regulations with all of these hurdles in place?MERHILL: First and foremost, I am grateful that so many community members did engage in this process this summer, despite the fact that we are all doing our best to navigate the current pandemic, and living and working in towns and cities all over the world. Over the past few months, my team has engaged a diverse set of groups across Harvard, including with students and staff from our Title IX liaison working groups, staff members from the Office of Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (OSAPR), response peer counselors, care peer educators, and members of Our Harvard Can Do Better (OHCDB). We’ve met virtually with the co-presidents of the Undergraduate Council, and with individual students, staff, and faculty members, all of whom provided key input on decision points related to the new requirements set forth by the DOE, and how we could best implement them here at Harvard. There were meetings with individual deans as well as discussions at the Provost’s Council to assure that the viewpoints of many constituencies were represented.As a preliminary matter, everyone agreed that in light of the challenging timeline, current circumstances, and the importance of these decisions, these policies and procedures should be interim ones. We knew that we must all work together to ensure that they protect the safety of everyone within Harvard’s community, while providing fair processes for the parties involved when instances of sexual harassment or misconduct occur. Over the next 12 months, we will incorporate the experiences and perspectives of community members into closely examining the interim policies and procedures, while making modifications as appropriate to meet the needs of the community and ensuring compliance with the law.Harvard will enact two interim policies: The first — Harvard University Interim Title IX Sexual Harassment Policy — was developed in response to the recent changes to the Title IX regulations, issued by the Department of Education on May 6 of 2020. The second — Harvard University Interim Other Sexual Misconduct Policy — will address misconduct that falls outside the jurisdiction of the first and was previously addressed under the University’s Sexual and Gender-Based Harassment Policy.Why do this? Because Harvard remains committed to going beyond the minimum requirements stipulated by the new Title IX regulations and to addressing the same types of conduct we addressed prior to the DOE’s changes.GAZETTE:  I think you’re beginning to get at one of the major changes required by the DOE, which relates to how sexual harassment is defined according to Title IX, and how Harvard has decided to address this change.MERHILL: That’s right. Under the new regulations, sexual harassment is defined as conduct that is so severe, pervasive, and objectively offensive that it effectively denies a person equal access to the University’s education, work programs, or activities. The new definition does include quid pro quo harassment, which was included in the prior rules, as well as four new categories of conduct now considered per se sexual harassment. These include sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking. The alleged conduct must happen against a person in the United States on University property or in connection with a University program or activity. The new Title IX regulations require that we dismiss those matters that do not meet this definition but they do allow schools to address the allegations under other misconduct policies within the institutions themselves.This is a substantial shift from the old definition of sexual harassment as unwelcome conduct that is severe, persistent, or pervasive: concerns have been raised about the use of the conjunctive “and” in the new definition instead of the disjunctive “or” in the old definition, as being more restrictive. Additionally, the old regulations did not require the conduct to take place in the United States and did not include the prescriptive requirement of dismissal, which allowed institutions to go beyond the minimum regulatory requirements.Many students have raised concerns about the new definition of sexual harassment, in particular as it relates to conduct during study-abroad programs or as part of field sites. Taking into consideration the feedback from the community, we decided it was essential to adopt a second policy — the Other Sexual Misconduct Policy — to address conduct no longer addressed under the new Title IX regulations, including but not limited to conduct that takes place outside of the United States. “Harvard remains committed to going beyond the minimum requirements stipulated by the new Title IX regulations and to addressing the same types of conduct we addressed prior to the DOE’s changes.” The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news.last_img read more

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Vermont to get $14 million from 2011 Trade Adjustment Assistance initial funding allocations

first_imgThe US Department of Labor has announced initial funding allocations for Trade Adjustment Assistance for states to assist workers who lose their jobs due to outsourcing and foreign trade. Vermont will get nearly $14 million to cover jobs lost to foreign competition. This announcement includes two funding levels for states under the program: one under the current, expanded level of authorized funding, and one at a reduced level that will take effect on Jan. 1, 2011, if Congress fails to renew the expanded TAA program authorized by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. If the expanded program is not renewed, states stand to lose approximately $267 million in initial allocations, and thousands of workers could be excluded from the program. Additional reserve funding would be lost as well.”The Recovery Act has allowed us to serve more Americans through the Trade Adjustment Assistance program, giving workers access to essential services in a time of need,” said Secretary of Labor Hilda L. Solis. “Returning TAA to pre-expansion funding levels and eligibility guidelines would leave a staggering number of workers in states across the country without access to this important program.”TAA provides workers with the opportunity to obtain the skills, resources and support needed to gain re-employment. Funds are used to provide career training, employment and case management services, and to pay for associated administrative costs. States will receive funds according to these allocations once the department receives its fiscal year 2011 congressional appropriation.The Recovery Act included a major expansion and reform of the TAA program, and authorized an increase in the maximum amount of TAA funds that may be used for training nationwide, from $220 million to $575 million. If Congress does not renew the expanded program before Jan. 1, 2011, funding will revert to pre-Recovery Act levels, and service industry workers will no longer be covered by the program.Funds announced today are the initial allocations for fiscal year 2011 for both the expanded and reduced levels. The remaining funds are being held in reserve by the Labor Department for distribution as needed throughout the year.  Kansas$1,397,111$743,098 Missouri$13,408,136$5,651,273 Vermont$873,842$528,898 StateTotal FY 2011 TAA Initial Allocation $575 Million Training Level*Total FY 2011 TAA Initial Allocation $220 Million Training Level* Colorado$3,690,552$1,565,884 New Mexico$3,129,322$1,420,353 Nebraska$1,159,748$716,459 Missouri7,4582,77137.15% Delaware$616,408$481,944 Georgia$10,127,786$4,466,586 Montana61627644.81% District of Columbia$0$0 Indiana15,0162,96919.77% Idaho$6,139,516$2,645,829 Illinois$16,828,636$6,776,605 Total$446,962,500$180,200,000 Arizona8,3724,83257.72% New Hampshire$1,462,784$770,937 New Mexico2,4001,55864.92% Louisiana$1,977,091$959,206 Virginia9,3923,99742.56% Maryland$976,878$603,513 Iowa4,1191,32332.12% Montana$3,461,566$1,454,567 U.S. Department of Labor releases are accessible on the Internet at http://www.dol.gov(link is external).  The information in this news release will be made available in alternate format (large print, Braille, audio tape or disc) from the COAST office upon request.  Please specify which news release when placing your request at 202-693-7828 or TTY 202-693-7755.  The Labor Department is committed to providing America’s employers and employees with easy access to understandable information on how to comply with its laws and regulations.  For more information, please visit www.dol.gov/compliance(link is external). Wisconsin$18,656,325$7,755,725 Nebraska1,15472462.74% South Dakota92535037.84% Michigan$57,129,772$21,353,658 Nevada$502,420$0 Connecticut3,0661,76257.47% DC000 Wyoming4600.00% New York$11,329,275$4,189,378 North Carolina$39,199,147$16,295,004 Georgia4,6821,51132.27% Ohio$26,862,367$9,191,913 Arkansas3,50771720.44% Delaware1,27680.63% Pennsylvania$22,116,022$9,410,643 North Carolina17,3738,73150.26% North Dakota905905100.00% South Carolina$12,569,797$5,602,451 Hawaii4343100.00% Texas$15,077,456$6,208,649 New York10,4155,40151.86% Indiana$23,734,414$9,085,254 Wyoming$0$0 Texas16,65510,00960.10% Virginia$9,750,747$3,715,915 Louisiana1,661663.97% Florida5,4472,39844.02% Alaska$541,773$0 U.S. Department of Labor releases are accessible on the Internet at http://www.dol.gov(link is external).  The information in this news release will be made available in alternate format (large print, Braille, audiotape or disc) from the COAST office upon request.  Please specify which news release when placing your request at 202-693-7828 or TTY 202-693-7755.  The Labor Department is committed to providing America’s employers and employees with easy access to understandable information on how to comply with its laws and regulations.  For more information, please visit http://www.dol.gov/compliance(link is external). Florida$3,375,973$1,269,050 Meanwhile, Solis today issued the following statement on the extension of the expanded Trade Adjustment Assistance program:”Last year, through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, Congress made the wise decision to expand Trade Adjustment Assistance eligibility to service sector workers adversely impacted by trade.  Prior to that, the program focused solely on workers in the manufacturing sector.  The expanded program offers a crucial lifeline to many working families whose breadwinners lost their jobs through no fault of their own.  “In fact, between May 2009 and the end of September, more than 155,000 Americans who may have otherwise been ineligible for assistance were certified to receive the income support and training that they desperately needed.  TAA benefits can help participants keep food on the table for their families, and training ensures they are prepared for new employment opportunities.  “Unless Congress takes action, however, the expanded TAA program will expire at the end of 2010.  That could leave a great many trade-impacted workers across the country without needed support and services.  And it would undermine the progress we are making as a nation toward economic recovery.”It also merits underscoring that those who receive TAA have lost jobs through no fault of their own and many are actively pursuing training for new careers. In other words, these are experienced workers, firmly committed to putting in the effort to get back on their feet. As a group, they have strong work records, and they are a tremendous asset to our economy. Continuing to help them gain the skills needed to enter good jobs contributes to the overall health of our economy, and it just makes sense.”As this issue comes to a head over the coming weeks, federal legislators will have an important choice to make.  I urge them to keep in mind that America’s families still need our help, to make the responsible decision and to extend the expanded TAA program.  It is also my hope that Congress acts on our no-cost technical fixes to the TAA Community College and Career Training Program that will help this new program succeed and benefit a broader population of unemployed workers.” Utah$3,765,926$1,529,840center_img Nevada873439.08% Oklahoma$3,218,115$1,644,148 Alaska33100.00% West Virginia$4,537,397$1,975,437 Mississippi$3,455,817$1,438,379 South Dakota$1,955,398$802,322 Illinois18,5816,06732.65% Oregon11,3615,82851.30% Oregon$15,804,810$5,794,776 New Jersey$3,895,246$1,949,997 Colorado3,0692,33075.92% Tennessee12,1283,15826.04% Idaho1,9711,48975.55% Iowa$7,258,088$2,439,507 Minnesota$8,244,122$3,133,521 Maryland97159961.69% Puerto Rico$488,909$0 North Dakota$653,372$0 Kentucky8,0873,25240.21% *Includes training, administrative and case management funds Ohio31,4657,74324.61% Kentucky$11,628,652$4,678,271 Vermont89328431.80% Michigan45,33013,29629.33% Kansas1,55495061.13% Mississippi2,49291336.64% Massachusetts$8,977,944$4,130,816 Utah3,2682,18666.89% Rhode Island$3,208,666$1,463,611 California23,67816,22368.52% New Hampshire1,02180178.45% New Jersey5,4654,81788.14% Washington$11,989,030$4,682,929 Minnesota7,2463,45247.64% Connecticut$4,014,079$1,596,745 Hawaii$0$0 Massachusetts8,2285,37565.33% Oklahoma1,6681,36882.01% Alabama$8,754,884$3,539,184 Tennessee$8,317,583$4,003,082 StateTotal Workers Certified Since Recovery Act ExpansionWorkers Covered Under New Provisions Since Recovery Act ExpansionPercent of Workers Under New Provisions Since Recovery Act Expansion Maine2,44677131.52% Arkansas$9,741,945$3,749,887 California$13,135,465$5,724,425 Rhode Island1,20152843.96% Maine$4,789,892$1,782,059 South Carolina7,1273,36247.17% Washington6,3002,01431.97% Pennsylvania22,1527,28832.90% Puerto Rico77900.00% West Virginia3,6022,93281.40% Wisconsin11,9263,82732.09% Arizona$3,032,300$1,278,272 Alabama8,8003,90644.39% Total367,427155,14742.23% Source: U.S. Department of Labor WASHINGTON, Nov. 17, 2010 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ —last_img read more

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New Australian study, same old conclusion: Renewables are cheaper than gas, coal

first_imgNew Australian study, same old conclusion: Renewables are cheaper than gas, coal FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Renew Economy:An updated study on current and future generation costs by the CSIRO and the Australian Energy Market Operator confirms that wind, solar and storage technologies are by far the cheapest form of low carbon options for Australia, and are likely to dominate the global energy mix in coming decades.The first report, GenCost 2018, identified that wind and solar were by far the cheapest forms of new generation technologies, clearly cheaper than coal, and even when combined with storage, remained easily the cheapest form low carbon electricity options.A draft of the updated study, GenCost 2019-20, has been quietly posted on the AEMO website and confirms that wind and solar and storage remain the cheapest technologies, now and into the future, and much cheaper than the technologies promoted by the Australian government – gas, carbon capture, and nuclear.Its capital cost estimates – which assume continue cost reductions for solar, wind and dramatic falls for batteries, remain little changed from the 2018 version, although wind cost reductions are lower than expected last year.And despite ferocious criticism by the nuclear lobby, its estimates for nuclear remain unchanged, largely because it says there have been no technology advances since the last report. It does recognise the potential for small nuclear reactors in certain scenarios, but these are heavily qualified: they are at least a decade away, and would still deliver a levelised cost of energy at least twice that of wind and solar and storage.“The global generation mix is expected to be dominated by wind and solar photovoltaic (PV) by 2050 in all three scenarios explored in this report: Central, High CRE and Diverse technology,” the report says.[Giles Parkinson]More: New CSIRO, AEMO study confirms wind, solar and storage beat coal, gas and nuclearlast_img read more

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206 Miles: Teams Tackle The Smoky Mountain Relay

first_imgTeams tackle the Smoky Mountain Relay with costumes, water balloons, breast pumps, and 80s music.John Mitchell, a 34-year-old from Hendersonville, N.C., has been running on Western North Carolina’s roads and trails for a couple of decades. But that experience didn’t prepare him for running the Smoky Mountain Relay for the first time in 2015.He remembers one cold and drizzly night in particular. He’s lying on the floor of a passenger van trying not to puke as the driver navigates a winding gravel road tucked along the mountains outside of Franklin, N.C.He knows a few of his 11 teammates, but the rest are folks he’s just met. One of them, a woman named Caroline, is sitting on one of the bench seats pumping breast milk for her four-month-old. Another guy named Mike has jacked up the volume on the van’s stereo to 11—projecting a sonic boom of the Last of the Mohicans theme for miles. The team’s captain, Butch, even convinced a few people to fly in from Alaska to run with his Appalachian-based pals, which inspired the team’s name: the Appalaskans.Oh yeah, they’re all wearing animal masks and costumes and the outside of the van is decorated with a theme of “What does the fox say?”It’s been fun, but John’s fried. The team’s been moving for 30 hours and he’s already run two legs totaling something like 15 miles. He just wants to go to sleep. But he has one more leg to run—an eight-miler—and he’s not sure he can do it. Caroline hands him some kind of goo-based energy drink, and he throws it back while trying to munch down a stale bagel.The van pulls over at a checkpoint: this is where they’ll meet Jen, who is running now and will pass the snap-on bracelet to John so he can start his leg. Just then, as the team spills outside the van, the sun begins to break across the ridges. The honeyed-light dripping over the landscape seems to activate something inside John and his teammates. DJ Mike begins dancing with a guy alternatively nicknamed PowPow or Speed Goat. When the beam from Jen’s headlamp peaks over the hill, everyone begins screaming, hollering, and cheering.John still wants to quit—to tell his teammates he can’t do it. But he knows they are counting on him. Everyone is posting incredible split times—they’re egging each other on to run faster than they ever have. He figures he can run at least a little bit farther before his heart explodes.Smoky Mountain RelaySmiles All AroundAs Jen stretches out to hand over the bracelet, DJ Mike blasts out the theme to Chariots of Fire—which sends a chill through John’s spine. He grabs the bracelet—and takes off.Team relays have become increasingly popular among runners in recent years, especially in the Southern Appalachians where road races like the 208-mile Blue Ridge Relay (BRR) and even new events like Ville-to-Ville—where runners will travel some 73 miles between Asheville and Greenville, S.C.—sell out in minutes.But the Smoky Mountain Relay (SMR), which takes place from April 20-21 this year and covers some 206 miles—often goes overlooked. Like the BRR, the SMR was modeled after the famous Hood to Coast race that takes place in the Pacific Northwest. What makes the SMR special, as least for many of the teams that have run it since it began in 2014, is that it stretches through some of the most stunning scenery you can find in our area.Starting out at Pink Beds State Park, teams of runners—which range from six to twelve—and their support vehicles weave their way across the landscape on mostly forest roads and, in a few cases, trails and bridges. Each team will complete 36 legs—each with its own unique twists-and-turns and ups-and-downs—over the course of about 36 hours until they cross the finish line next to the roaring rapids of the Nantahala Outdoor Center.dilfs Smoky Mountain RelayThe DILFSWhile there is always a healthy sense of competition, most teams focus more on having fun. There are even prizes awarded for the best costume theme. Creative standouts over the years have ranged from Pac-Man and Forrest Gump to a squad of Star Wars-themed storm troopers. An all-female team called the Pussyfooters (featured image) ran clad in leopard-print gear. There has also been a team of six male runners who called themselves DILF—which rhymes with MILF, if you know what we mean—which included one runner who dressed up as a policeman who “arrested” runners from other teams while another ran his routes in a Borat-inspired thong.The unique combination of scenery, camaraderie, and just plain zany fun is why the people who run SMR are so passionate about running it again year after year. But there’s some scuttlebutt that this year might be its last unless more teams sign up—which just baffles anyone who has run it. After all, this relay isn’t just for PR-obsessed runners; it’s also about groups of friends coming together for a wild weekend running through the woods.John runs his final leg by focusing on putting one foot in front of the other. Left right—left right. The road hugs the Little Tennessee River, where the rising sun zaps foggy-wraiths rising from the water. He thinks he might be seeing things. With about a mile left to go, the van pulls alongside as his teammates whoop and holler their encouragement. He waves back at them. And then, with a flourish of triumphant noise, his team speeds off to the next checkpoint to await him on their way to the finish line.“We did something special together in the dark coves and high ridges of the Great Smoky Mountains,” says John. “For a moment, we forgot about everything but fulfilling our promises to one another. Friendship is about shared experience. That is what team running is all about.”For more information, check out smokymountainrelay.comlast_img read more

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Florida courts brace for budget fallout

first_img November 1, 2001 Gary Blankenship Senior Editor Regular News Florida courts brace for budget fallout Florida courts brace for budget fallout Senior Editor With a prediction of poorer and slower services to litigants and fewer services for children caught up in the court system, Florida judges, prosecutors, and defenders are bracing for the outcome of the special legislative session to address the state’s budget shortfall. The session began October 22, as this News went to press, and was scheduled to end no later than November 1. But even before the session, called to address an estimated $1.3-billion revenue deficit, courts and related agencies were cutting back and planning for possible further budget reductions. In a September 26 memo to chief judges, Supreme Court Chief Justice Charles Wells ordered a halt to all hiring, except for judicial assistants, and a moratorium on purchases of equipment and office furniture. In turn, Wells was asked by the House and Senate appropriations committees to identify how the court budget could be cut by five percent. Trial courts also began coping with cutbacks in state programs that affect their operations, such as not having probation officers in every courtroom. And state attorneys and public defenders are grappling with the real possibility of furloughing employees and not being able to handle their caseloads. The problem, say many court officials, is their budgets are mostly salaries with little other spending, and any cuts mean reductions in service. “We don’t have much wiggle room,” said Skip Babb, Fifth Circuit public defender and president of the Florida Public Defenders Association. “We don’t anticipate a five or seven or 10 percent cut in arrests or informations filed or people charged with capital crimes and facing the death penalty. Our caseloads are already overloaded. We’re in quite a dilemma. We have a constitutional responsibility to do this work, and we’re already busting at the seams.” The budget problems began last summer when the nation’s economic sluggishness led to a decline in state income. Gov. Jeb Bush sent out letters to state agencies, including the courts and related agencies, asking them to begin finding ways to cut spending. The September 11 terrorist attacks put a further dent in state revenues, because of a decline in sales taxes collected from tourists. State experts estimated on October 15 that the shortfall would be around $1.3 billion for the current budget year and $1.7 billion for next year. Aside from Bush’s efforts and his call for a special session, the Senate Appropriations Committee and the House Fiscal Responsibility Council sent letters to all state departments, including judicial branch agencies, asking them how they would cut their budgets by five percent. A spokesman for the Senate committee said that is not an indication the legislature will make an across-the-board five-percent cut, but the information will help lawmakers figure out where to make cuts, both in the special session and in next year’s regular session which will draw up the 2002-03 budget. “I see no alternative but to impose a hiring freeze on all positions in the branch, with the one exception of judicial assistants,” Chief Justice Wells wrote in his memo to chief circuit judges. “Additionally, I am imposing a moratorium on the purchase of equipment or furniture. I also encourage you to make every effort to limit travel in your court and to curtail other routine expenditures.” Circuits where that imposes an undue hardship can apply to Wells for an exception. “I know these measure are difficult and will impede normal operations, but we have no other choice until we have a better understanding of what the reductions will be,” he wrote. While that memo was going out, Wells was also working on the reply to the legislative budgeting panels on how the courts could cut five percent of their budgets. His letter noted that the courts have a constitutional duty to provide access for all people to “a functioning and efficient court system.” “[M]y first response to you is that the judicial branch cannot meet your target of a five-percent reduction in the recurring current budget without serious harm to the courts’ constitutional responsibility,” Wells wrote. He recommended that no judgeships be cut and that none of the judgeships approved by the legislature earlier this year effective January 2 be delayed. Meeting the five-percent goal, Wells added, would require these cuts: $453,500 from the Foster Care Citizen Review Panels in seven counties; almost $1.2 million from the Juvenile Alternative Sanctions Program; $692,636 from Dade County’s Voices for Children program; almost $4.2 million from the guardian ad litem program; almost $1.7 million from the attorney ad litem program in Orange and Osceola counties; $200,000 from a Dade County truancy program; $90,262 from a guardianship monitoring program in Broward County; $992,760 from the indigency examination program; $325,000 from pre-indictment witness expenses; and $10,500 from the Drug Court Steering Committee. “We emphatically state that these trial court items should not be cut,” Wells added. “All but four of these items directly relate to children, which we all believe have to be a priority even in difficult fiscal periods. If we do not pay for these kinds of children’s services now, it is our definite experience that we will pay much more later. Certainly, the guardian ad litem program should be a priority.” Wells said if any of those programs were cut, it should be ones that benefit only local areas and statewide programs should be spared. He went on to say there were savings that could be made in the court budget by forgoing new funding in the 2001-02 budget and curtailing other programs. Those include: $72,382 in Supreme Court operating cost reductions; $454,365 in service reductions from the Office of the State Courts Administrator; $288,258 in cost reductions for the district courts of appeal; $1.2 million by not spending new funding for the guardian ad litem program; not spending $760,000 for improvements in the Pinellas and Brevard counties drug court programs; $371,796 from the foster care review programs in Clay, Duval, Nassau, Marion, and Manatee counties; and $200,000 from the children’s advocacy program in Hillsborough County. The chief justice concluded that while he wanted to be frank on why it would be harmful to cut five percent from the courts’ budget, “I want you to be expressly assured that I am committed to restricting funding requests to the activities necessary to provide services essential to the people of this state.” Among the circuit courts, the budget crisis has had a variable impact, depending at least somewhat on what programs are funded locally and which depend on state dollars. For example both Broward (17th Circuit) and Palm Beach (15th Circuit) counties have court psychology programs to which judges can refer parties when determining visitation in divorce cases and in dependency and delinquency cases. The state-funded Broward program has been cut, while the locally funded Palm Beach program is continuing. Seventeenth Circuit Chief Judge Dale Ross said the termination of that program has had two effects on the court. The psychological services have to be sent to outside sources at a greater expense, which means indigents can’t afford the services, and it takes longer to get the services and therefore slows the handling of cases. The circuit has also lost a guardianship investigator from its probate division and may lose a general master that is part of its family court plan, he said. Any further cuts could be catastrophic, Ross said, adding, “As you well know, the court doesn’t have programs. Ninety-six percent of the court’s budget is comprised of the judges’ and the assistants’ salaries; everything else is four percent. There’s really no room to cut.” If there are cuts, there will be “loss of service to the public and caseloads will back up,” Ross said. “What I hope doesn’t happen is when you have a single mother who desperately needs that child support that it doesn’t trickle down so she’s without that child support.” Fifteenth Circuit Chief Judge Edward Fine said cuts to non-court programs can have an impact on courts. He noted that a Department of Corrections pretrial intervention program that kept 1,800 people out of jail has been cut, which could place a greater burden on the courts. And he’s concerned the current budget crisis is the precursor of a much bigger problem when, under mandate of a constitutional amendment passed in 1998, the state is required to pick up a larger share of court funding no later than July 2004. He said the 15th Circuit has gotten a variety of private and federal grants and county funding for programs that not only help the courts function more efficiently but also improve services to residents. Those include such things as a two-year, $400,000 grant to create an elder court center to serve the county’s 300,000 people who are 60 or older, a federal grant to set up a drug court, and a county-funded program that has a social worker/certified mediator meet with divorcing couples who are having difficulty over child custody. “People come in,” Fine said of the latter program, “and she’s been able to resolve 80 to 90 percent of the problems right on the spot. That takes zero judge time.” Most circuits similarly have a variety of specialized programs, many with non-state funds, to meet unique local needs that might not be funded, not because of a tight budget but because the legislature might not even notice them, he said. “My worry is not that there is a budget cut; it’s more that we’re going to be below their radar screen on things that if they knew about, they would fund, even with a budget cut,” Fine said. “We’re rooted a lot deeper into the community than just adjudicating cases. The legal system is a lot more involved than even people who work in it everyday are aware of. We have all of these little specialized programs. They’re not just do-good things, they serve important social needs.” Aside from direct reductions that could come in court funding, Fine said some cuts to other state agencies have affected the courts. He noted the Department of Corrections has reduced the number of probation officers, which means that officers are no longer in every court. Consequently, he said, when a judge sentences a defendant to probation, an officer is not always there to immediately process that person. In some cases, the defendant has been ordered to report on his own to the probation office for processing. Judge Charles Mitchell, acting chief judge of the Fourth Circuit, said the hiring freeze had been implemented there, but the budget crisis had not otherwise affected court operations. Like Judges Fine and Ross, he was worried that the legislature’s cuts would hit support programs like the guardians ad litem or the drug court. “We are concerned about the support programs we have worked very hard over the years to get in place and work very well,” Mitchell said. “It’s very difficult to cut our budget because we cut programs if we do.” The situation may be even more critical for state attorneys and public defenders. Of their state budgets, 95 percent or so goes directly to salaries. “We have been affected,” said Third Circuit State Attorney Jerry Blair, president of the Florida Prosecuting Attorneys Association. “Our [association] Education Committee met last week and we have eliminated some seminars. “Virtually every state attorney office has implemented a policy limiting travel for training and other purposes,” he said. “For all intents and purposes, out-of-state travel has been eliminated by all of the offices.” Further cuts “are ultimately going to have to come out of dollars that were intended for salaries,” Blair added. “That will come either from furloughs or layoffs.” The timing, in the aftermath of the September 11 attacks, also couldn’t be worse, he said. “With all of the emphasis on public safety, I don’t think local law enforcement agencies will be cutting back on their activities. Most of these cases are going to be in the state system, and we’re going to be allocating fewer state resources to deal with them.” Babb, the Florida Public Defenders Association president, agreed. He said with U.S. attorneys offices likely devoting more time to anti-terrorism cases, other cases are likely to wind up in state courts. “We have 95 percent of our budget statewide in salaries,” he said. “And we anticipate if we have to take substantial cuts, we’ll have to tell people on our staffs, ‘Here’s the work and it’s increasing, but we don’t want you to come to work a couple days a month.’” Like state attorneys, public defenders have also cut training costs, and Babb said he’s concerned that, with ever more complex laws, there will be more errors that will lead to appellate courts ordering new trials. Another worry, Babb said, is last year, with Gov. Bush’s support, the legislature approved salary boosts for public defender and state attorney staff. That was important because of high attorney turnover as private sector pay rose and public sector compensation failed to keep pace. Those increases are scheduled to go into effect in January — unless they are cut as part of the budget crisis. Those incentives, Babb said, helped both recruit new attorneys and retain existing ones. “We are anticipating that if that is. . . withdrawn, the legal staffs in public service are going to see a mass exit,” he said. “And that affects public safety.” The crisis could also affect county governments. Babb said public defenders, if they have inadequate staff to provide competent representation, must withdraw from cases, with counties picking up the bill. That already happens in five circuits, he said, the most notable being Miami-Dade County which pays the salaries for 82 attorneys in the 11th Circuit Public Defender’s Office. “If everybody else is put into that situation, then counties are in somewhat of a predicament because these costs are unexpected and unbudgeted, and some counties are already at the cap in their millage,” Babb said. “How are they going to pay for this if they haven’t anticipated it was coming?” Babb has communicated these and other concerns to Bush in letters responding to requests to find savings. In an August 10 letter, he summarized the situation as: “Since this time last year, our workload has been increased by the certification and funding of 36 new judges, by more Jimmie Ryce cases, and by the 10-20-Life and prison release reoffender laws, just to mention a few of the factors. Our attorneys’ caseloads remain dangerously overloaded, but we were not granted any new positions last session. In short, because our work continues to grow along with the responsibilities attached thereto, we simply cannot identify budget cuts without compromising our ethical and professional responsibilities.”last_img read more

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Six tips for better email marketing

first_imgFocus, Focus, Focus. The modern consumer is not going to give you more than a few seconds of his or her time before they move on. This means that you have to concentrate on making your email blasts concise and quick to read. Ideally, an email blast should focus on one thing – a great loan rate, a new product, a special event, etc.Incorporate Graphics and Imagery. Nothing makes a reader zone out faster than a big block of text. Use graphics to highlight your overall point and create visual interest. (However, don’t overload the page with too many images. And be sure to keep your image file sizes small for faster loading.)Clear Call to Action. Now that you have consumers’ attention with a focused message, don’t lose them because you failed to include a clear call to action. Be bold in telling your readers what you expect them to do next. Apply now! Call this number. Like us on Facebook.Optimize for Mobile. Every day, the number of people who prefer to view web content on a mobile device, rather than a desktop, grows. It is therefore critical that your emails load correctly for mobile devices. Nobody is going to take the time to zoom in or out to read everything you have to say.Keep Your Mailing List Up-to-Date. Don’t waste your time and money emailing to defunct addresses. Make it a company-wide initiative to collect new emails and keep your list current.By sticking to these tips, your financial institution stands a much better chance of reaching/engaging people and getting a great return for your marketing dollar. Though phishing scams and spam sometimes give it a bad rap, email marketing is still one of the most viable, effective, and inexpensive tools in the marketing mix, especially for credit unions. However, many credit unions could benefit from a fresh, new perspective on their email marketing. All digital marketing, including email, is fluid and constantly evolving. What worked well a year ago might not cut it today.With this in mind, we offer a few suggestions for improving your email marketing efforts:Subject Line Etiquette. What you put in your subject line is crucial, as it determines whether or not your email message will make it through your recipients’ spam filters. Popular email providers such as Constant Contact and MailChimp provide “spam check” options for each email you create to help you get it right before sending. If you don’t have that option, avoid these mistakes:Excessive use of exclamation points!!!!USING ALL CAPSDramatic phrases like “Once in a lifetime opportunity” and “Act now” 10SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Jeff Kjoller Jeff has extensive experience in branding, art direction and graphic design, having served employers and clients in a creative capacity for more than twenty-five years. After graduating from the University … Web: www.loudthought.biz Detailslast_img read more

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Department of Labor issues Final Fiduciary Rule

first_imgThe Department of Labor (DOL) has released its long-awaited final fiduciary rule and clarified that IRAs—along with Archer medical savings accounts (MSAs), health savings accounts (HSAs), and Coverdell education savings accounts (ESAs)—are included in the scope of the final rule.The final rule expands the definition of “fiduciary” under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA), by redefining “investment advice” to encompass activities that occur within pension and retirement plans, but that do not constitute investment advice under the existing definition of investment advice. The DOL’s expanded definition of fiduciary of an employee benefit plan adds brokers and advisers providing advice to IRA, MSA, and HSA owners and ESA participants to the definition.The application of the final rule to MSAs, HSAs, and ESAs has received little media or industry attention, but it should come as no surprise, given the path taken by DOL to apply the rule to IRAs. Although IRAs were first authorized by ERISA, the DOL does not have direct regulatory authority over IRAs. IRA provisions are found only in the Internal Revenue Code (IRC) and fall outside of ERISA’s purview. Therefore, the Department of the Treasury—rather than the DOL—oversees most issues regarding IRAs.However, under Executive Order 12108, authority over certain issues related to prohibited transactions under IRC Section (Sec.) 4975, that govern the treatment of IRAs, was transferred from the Treasury Department to the DOL. The DOL has asserted that its authority over the prohibited transaction rules that govern IRAs extends to other non-ERISA plans covered by IRC Sec. 4975, including MSAs, HSAs, and ESAs, and grants the DOL authority to include these plans in the scope of the final rule.As defined in the final rule, investment advice includes providing investment or investment management recommendations, and includes recommendations to buy or sell investments, receive a distribution or execute a rollover or transfer, and manage investments. In addition to the receipt of direct or indirect compensation, for the relationship to rise to fiduciary status, there must bea representation or acknowledgement that the adviser is acting in a fiduciary capacity;advice given pursuant to a verbal or written agreement, arrangement, or understanding that it is individualized to the recipient; oradvice or a recommendation regarding an investing or account management decision related to a retirement plan, IRA, MSA, HSA, or ESA.The key to determining whether “fiduciary investment advice” has been given is whether a “recommendation” has occurred. This is defined as a communication that “would be reasonably viewed as a suggestion” to take a particular course of action, or refrain from doing so. The more the advice is tailored to the recipient, the more likely it will be viewed as a recommendation.The final rule will add additional compliance burdens to brokers and advisers providing advice to IRA, MSA, and HSA owners and ESA participants, including credit union service organizations (CUSOs) and, potentially, credit unions. Fortunately, the DOL made substantial changes to the proposed rule to incorporate feedback it received through written comments and public hearings, including a number of credit union concerns that the Credit Union National Association (CUNA) highlighted in the two comment letters it submitted during the comment period.As with any new regulation, allowing adequate time for implementation is essential, and the final rule extends the implementation date. Although the final rule is effective June 7, 2016, 60 days after it was published in the Federal Register, brokers and advisers will not be governed by the conduct and disclosure rules until April 10, 2017. And, a transition period for compliance with the best interest contract (BIC) exemption will be in place from that date until January 1, 2018, if certain conditions are met. Full compliance with the exemptions will be required as of January 1, 2018.Compliance with the BIC exemption—the contractual agreement between brokers and advisers and the recipients of their advice—also is simplified under the final rule. In cases where a signed BIC agreement is required—such as in an IRA rollover situation—the contract can be incorporated into other account opening documents, and can be entered into before or at the same time as the investment transaction is executed, instead of the time at which the investments are initially recommended.The final rule also clarifies the definitions of “investment advice” and “investment education” and provides a non-exhaustive list of certain types of communications that generally are not considered recommendations. The final rule clarifies that general communications such as newsletters, marketing materials, public presentations, investment reports, and nonpersonal information will not be considered recommendations giving rise to fiduciary status. For example, advising IRA owners that they are required to take a required minimum distribution from their IRA would not be treated as investment advice under the final rule.This change should allow credit unions to continue to provide members with general information about retirement savings and planning for the future. CUNA was concerned that under the proposed regulation, credit union members who look to their credit unions for information on saving for retirement would not have access to the financial advice that they need.It will take some time to fully analyze the DOL’s final rule, which is more than 600 pages in length. Credit unions generally will not be subject to the rule if they are not offering investment advice for a fee. However, credit unions should note that the final rule clarifies that the term “investment property” includes certificates of deposit and similar products. Credit unions would be well-advised to carefully review the final rule and how it will affect their policies and procedures. This is especially true if they offer investment services through CUSOs or third-party brokers, or plan to offer investment services in the future. 14SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Dennis Zuehlke Dennis is Compliance Manager for Ascensus. Mr. Zuehlke provides clients with technical support on tax-advantaged accounts (including individual retirement accounts, health savings accounts, simplified employee pension plans, and Coverdell education … Web: www.ascensus.com Detailslast_img read more

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