North Sanpete’s Mari Briggs Places First In Girls’ 3-Mile Run At Whasatch Rendezvous Saturday

first_img Written by Brad James August 29, 2020 /Sports News – Local North Sanpete’s Mari Briggs Places First In Girls’ 3-Mile Run At Whasatch Rendezvous Saturday Tags: Cross Country FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailMILLCREEK, Utah-Saturday, North Sanpete cross country standout Mari Briggs did well for the Hawks in winning the No. 4 heat of the girls’ 3-mile run at the Whasatch Rendezvous at the Cottonwodd Complex.Briggs ran her heat in a time of 20:49.08, besting Crisite Bastidas of Class 6-A West Jordan, who placed second in a time of 20:59.90.The Hawks were the only Mid-Utah Radio Sports Network school to compete at this event.In the senior boys’ 3-mile run, Gage Cox placed third in a time of 18:08.56 for the Hawks. Also competing in this race for North Sanpete was Jason Strait (11th; 20:06.38)Competing in the No. 7 heat of the boys’ 3-mile run, was Ryland Jones, who placed 13th in a time of 19:37.15 for North Sanpete. Meanwhile, Jerry Jones competed for North Sanpete in the boys’ freshmen 3-mile run, placing 21st in a time of 22:57.77.Other Hawks to place at the meet included Rachel Jones (14th in the No. 1 heat of the girls’ 3-mile run; 22:01.53), Tamsin Stewart (9th in the No. 2 heat of the girls’ 3-mile run; 22:02.50), Aubry Cook (8th in the No. 3 heat of the girls’ 3-mile run; 22:17.47), Madelyn Christensen (4th in the No. 5 heat of the girls’ 3-mile run; 21.51.06), Jocelyn Stewart (12th in the No. 6 heat of the girls’ 3-mile run; 24:00.12), Tylee Henrie (16th in the No. 7 heat of the girls; 3-mile run; 27:13.18), Shelby Wilson (19th in the girls’ juniors 3-mile run; 45:05.44), Brooklyn Larsen (11th in the girls’ freshmen 3-mile run; 26:29.97), Hallee Henrie (15th in the girls’ freshmen 3-mile run; 28:10.00) and Mariah Cook (16th in the girls’ freshmen 3-mile run; 28:42.18).Winners in each heat were as follows:Heat No. 1 of boys’ 3-mile run: Nathan Jaster, American Fork (15:24.12)Heat No. 2 of boys’ 3-mile run: Brayden Packard, American Fork (15:31.65)Heat No. 3 of boys’ 3-mile run: Kooper Dibb, American Fork (16:13.08)Heat No. 4 of boys’ 3-mile run: Jayden Fitzgarrald, American Fork (16:07.41)Heat No. 5 of boys’ 3-mile run: Nathan Hess, American Fork (16:46.40)Heat No. 6 of boys’ 3-mile run: Kaleb Graff, Snow Canyon (17:27.75)Heat No. 7 of boys’ 3-mile run: McKay Christensen, Timpanogos (16:56.04)Heat No. 1 of girls’ 3-mile run: Caila Odekirk, Hurricane (18:51.18)Heat No. 2 of girls’ 3-mile run: Alexis Patrick, Ridgeline (19:38.69)Heat No. 3 of girls’ 3-mile run: Mackenzie Duncan, Ridgeline (20:34.37)Heat No. 5 of girls’ 3-mile run: Emily Spaulding, Ridgeline (20:57.25)Heat No. 6 of girls’ 3-mile run: Sydnee Walton, Ridgeline (21:12.03)Heat No. 7 of girls’ 3-mile run: Brynlee Brown, Ridgeline (21:10.09)Boys’ 3-mile run senior: Lucas Peck, American Fork (16:42.45)Girls’ 3-mile run senior: Ellie Savage, Maple Mountain (21:51.06)Boys’ 3-mile run junior: Joshua Hernandez, American Fork (17:25.85)Boys’ 3-mile run junior Heat No. 2: Jared Thomas, American Fork (17:42.81)Girls’ 3-mile run junior: Carys Loerwald, Snow Canyon (22:35.03)Girls’ 3-mile run juior Heat No. 2: Anna Oborn, Ridgeline (22:30.41)Boys’ 3-mile run sophomore: Luke Cheney, Timpanogos (17:50.97)Boys’ 3-mile run sophomore Heat No. 2: Seth Smith, American Fork (17:23.85)Girls’ 3-mile run sophomore: Lana Hansen, Timpanogos (21:47.22)Girls’ 3-mile run sophomore Heat No. 2: Raygan Peterson, Timpanogos (21:24.31)Boys’ 3-mile run freshman: Anders Berlin, Timpanogos (17:23.00)Boys’ 3-mile run freshman Heat No. 2: Chase Pack, American Fork (18:14.69)Girls’ 3-mile run freshman: Sarah Howell, Timpanogos (22:36.09)Girls’ 3-mile run freshman Heat No. 2: MaKenzie Wilber, Maple Mountain (18:58.51)last_img read more

Read More »

Has the University sold its principles?

first_imgStanley HoHong Kong gambling tycoonIn May 2007, the University accepted a £2.5m donation from Hong Kong billionaire Stanley Ho, who has previously been investigated by the US government for suspected money-laundering and links with organised crime.Ho, an Asian entrepreneur who made his $7bn fortune running Macau’s gambling industry, announced that he was funding a new University Lectureship in Chinese History at a dinner attended by Vice-Chancellor John Hood.Nicknamed the “King of Gambling” in his native China, his company controlled a government monopoly on the gambling industry in Macau for forty years between 1962 and 2002.Attempts to expand his gambling businesses have drawn the attention of foreign governments. In 1999 he invested $30m opening a new capital in North Korea’s capital Pyongyang, next to the Korean Workers’ Party headquarters. Ho was the first to tell the media in March 2003 that North Korean leader Kim Jong Il was offering political asylum to Iraqi President Saddam Hussein.In September 2005, the Wall Street Journal reported that a number of US government agencies were investigating Seng Heng Bank, of which Ho is Chairman and Managing Director, for suspected links to criminal syndicates that were helping to finance North Korea’s nuclear programme.In 1990, a Royal Canadian Mounted Police report on Asian Organised Crime listed Stanley Ho as a member of the Kung Lok Triad gang and allocated him gang-file number 89-11770. He was subsequently refused Canadian casino licences, withdrawing one application when Canadian officials opened an investigation and having others turned down for reasons which the government did not disclose.A 1992 US Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs report found that while Ho was “not known to be involved in organised crime”, he had “some connection to organised crime figures” including former business partner and prolific gambler Yip Hon.Ho denied any links to organised crime, when a spokesperson told Cherwell, “Dr Ho strenuously denies that he is involved in organised crime and has never been charged by any authorities anywhere. Furthermore, STDM [Ho’s gambling company] has historically co-operated with the Portuguese authorities in Macau in fighting against crime and triad activities.”Wafic SaidSyrian arms dealerA £23m donation from former Syrian arms dealer Wafic Said in July 1996 led to the establishment of the Said Business School, located on Park End Street, in 2001. Said became a billionaire after brokering arms purchases for the Saudi Arabian government during the 1970s and 80s, overseeing the kingdom’s annual multi-billion dollar weapons imports.After moving to Saudi Arabia in 1969 and establishing a design and consultancy firm, Said was awarded numerous construction contracts, many of which were related to defence. He later became Saudi defence minister, and in 1986 signed the ‘Al-Yamamah’ arms deal with the British government, purchasing over $30bn worth of arms equipment and services from British Aerospace and other defence firms for the next decade. Allegations appeared in the media that various prominent British figures were being paid large commissions illegally on arms contracts.In July 1996, Said offered Oxford University £23m for a new business school. After congregation voted against proposals to build the new business school on a University playing field, the University proposed to build the new complex beside the city’s Victorian railway station. The application process  was expected to take months following a lengthy inquiry and consultation period. However, Prime Minister Tony Blair’s office personally intervened to speed approval for the business school’s planning application. Despite massive protests from students, staff and members of the local community, the building went ahead and the Said Business School opened on 5 November 2001.The School intends to construct an additional building on the Park End Street site. Said has agreed to donate a further £15m to fund the building, with the remaining funds for the building coming from an as yet unnamed donor.Sultan bin Abdul Aziz Al Saud Crown Prince of Saudi ArabiaOxford University accepted a  “munificent benefaction” of £2m from the Prince Sultan of Saudi Arabia in 2005, establishing the Ashmolean Museum’s Gallery of Islamic art and 10 Oxford scholarships for Saudi Arabian students.Senior dons called the University’s motives into question after the signing of a “Memorandum of Understanding” with Prince Sultan University in May 2006, supposedly on the “basis of mutual assistance and the furthering of academic study and understanding” between the two universities.One senior Oxford staff member told the Times Higher Education Supplement (THES), “I think it is short signed to give the impression to a donor that his donation has bought collaboration.”Another senior University member raised concerns about signing a memorandum with the little-known Prince Sultan University. “This deal sounds very worrying,” he said. “Prince Sultan University is not an internationally reputable institution. It is unclear what the terms of this deal are, but what benefit Oxford gets from it and how it was concluded is extremely puzzling. It will be interesting to know what the University Council made of it, if they knew about it.”The agreement’s academic value was accused of being undermined by the absence of signatures from either the Vice-Chancellor or Registrar. One academic told the THES, “This is deeply problematical. The academic case for this is entirely obscure. It looks like the partnership has been bought and signed for on behalf of the University by the development office, bypassing academic monitoring.”In November 2006, a University spokesperson told Cherwell, “These things don’t necessarily need to go through Council or Congregation. This one didn’t. It was picked up on at the time, and now it has been. There’s nothing sinister about it.”The Flick familyGerman industrialistsThe millionaire grandson of a German who was jailed as a Nazi war criminal withdrew his sponsorship of an Oxford University professorship after a campaign by University staff and members of the Jewish community.Gert Rudolph Flick removed his £350,000 endowment in April 1996, designated for a chair in Human Thought at Balliol College. In a letter to Sir Peter North, then the University’s Vice-Chancellor, Flick thanked the University for its “unwavering support, for which I will always be grateful…It has been an honour to be associated with Oxford University but, nevertheless, I hope that you will understand my position and will concur with my wishes.”The chair was originally created as an enterprise by two wealthy businessmen of Jewish origin, publishing magnate Lord Weidenfeld and General Electric Company chairman Sir Ronald Grierson.Critics accused Flick of using his wealth without any sense of guilt or responsibility, claiming it was derived from “dirty money”. His grandfather, Friedrich Flick, is alleged to have used slave labourers in munition factories during the Second World War. He was convicted of war crimes at the Nuremberg Trials and served three years of a seven year prison sentence.Having rebuilt his business empire following his imprisonment, he died in 1972 as one of the world’s wealthiest men. In 1983, it emerged that his son, Friedrich Karl Flick, had reduced his tax liabilities by bribing German politicians, leading to a government scandal and the resignation of minister for economic affairs Otto Graf Lambsdorff.Friedrich Flick died in October 2006 as the wealthiest person living in Austria. The Flick family has continued to refuse to pay compensation to wartime victims.last_img read more

Read More »

ADDITIONAL E-MAIL FROM CHAIRMAN OF THE VCRP CONCERNING DAN McGINN RESIGNATION FROM VANDERBURGH COUNTY…

first_imgFrom: Wayne Parke [mailto:[email protected]]Sent: Saturday, October 14, 2017 3:06 PMTo: Dan McGinn Subject: Dan McGinn Email–Tax Increase/Redistricting/Resignation. Dan— You are correct; I have criticized your recent city council votes because in my opinion your recent City Council votes that you have cast are not in the best interest of the citizens and the Republican Party. This is the United States and every citizen has a right to express their viewpoint to their elected officeholders—including if they believe, the officeholder made a mistake. On top of that, you are my representative on the City Council and I am the Chairman of the Republican Party. With this party position, I have a responsibility to do what I can to make sure Republicans remain in good standing with the Party. I have received many complaints on your recent votes and not one person has indicated to me that they support your votes on these two positions. You ran for and was elected as a Republican—not an Independent. As I have in the past, I will continue to voice my opinion on issues to all elected officials no matter what party they belong to if I believe their vote is not in the best interest of the citizens and the Republican Party. As I have in the past, I will continue to voice my opinion on issues to all elected officials no matter what party they belong to if I believe their vote is not in the best interest of the citizens and the Republican Party. You are not acting like the person I once knew and I do not know why…“ As can be seen in my email below, I ask Dan to resign from the City Council. I stated “…If your email is an accurate representation of your line of thinking, I suggest you also resign from your City Council position as well. You ran and was elected as a Republican. You have already stated you are not going to run for re-election in 2019–so resign now from your position as a City Councilman, so voters can be represented by a Republican because that is what they thought they were getting when you ran for office. You are not acting like the person I once knew and I do not know why. Some of you have ask to see the three emails related to Dan McGinn withdrawing from the Republican Party. He states he is withdrawing from the GOP because I criticized him for voting for a local tax increase and my criticism of him on his vote for passing a resolution regarding redistricting. Note the three emails related to this subject are below. As previously stated, in my opinion, your vote to increase the local income tax on all the citizens of Evansville and Vanderburgh County was very poor judgement on your part. In your email, you state I am “totally ignorant” on the financial conditions of our City. What is the basis of this statement? Since some City Council members voted against the ordinance to raise income taxes, are Justin Elpers, John Hayden, Connie Robinson and Jim Brinkmeyer also ignorant? If Our City is in bad financial condition, you have been on the City Council for several years and played a big role in getting it that way. I do not believe the City is in bad financial shape. Dear PC—  If you agree or disagree with my thought/reasoning process, please email your opinion/thoughts to me. I am very interested in your opinion on these issues. FYI—so far, no one has told me they supported Dan McGinn’s email. Thanks.  Wayne ParkeChairman [email protected]+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ I accept you resignation as a Republican Precinct Committeeman. If your email is an accurate representation of your line of thinking, I suggest you also resign from your City Council position as well. You ran and was elected as a Republican. You have already stated you are not going to run for re-election in 2019–so resign now from your position as a City Councilman, so voters can be represented by a Republican because that is what they thought they were getting when you ran for office. The method of drawing political districts/boundaries is not dishonest, it is not unconstitutional and it is not cheating as indicated in your email below. What facts do you have to support your slanderous and incorrect claims? Elected legislators are the ones that setup the redistricting process. They must follow the Indiana Constitution and the Indiana State Statues when overseeing the redistricting process. If the Democrats believed this process was against the Indiana Constitution/Statues, they would be in court in a heartbeat. If voters do not like the things an elected officeholder does, they vote them out of office. That is the American process. Republicans have won most recent elections because they have had the best candidates and they best represent the desires of the voters. I suggest you examine the makeup of the Evansville City Council. I believe the last time the City Council was controlled by Republicans was over 35 years ago. Following your logic–does this mean the City Ward boundaries were illegally gerrymandered to help Democrats? If yes, have you introduced and supported an ordinance to get the City County Council to pass an ordinance to redraw the boundaries? The answer is– no you have not. What facts do you have to back up your slanderous statement that the Republican Party and I are dishonest? If I do not agree with you, does that make me dishonest? Subject: Dan McGinn Related Emails-Withdrawal from Republican Thanks. Wayne ParkeChairman VCRP EDITOR FOOTNOTES: The above e-mails are posted without bias, opinion or editing.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

Read More »

Keeping it in the family

first_imgIt may have been the year of the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II, but for the Spencer family of Hathern in Leicestershire, 1953 marked the start of a business that would evolve into one of the most respected craft bakeries in the area.From its post-war inception, bread has always been king at Spencer’s and success is credited to the use of quality ingredients and “good, old-fashioned recipes”.Originally, bread and confectionery were produced and sold door to door until the 1980s when people were beginning to enjoy the value and variety of the supermarkets. As eating habits continued to change, the lunchtime trade evolved and Spencers Bakery found its bread rolls were in great demand, so it diversified into wholesale and, over the years, this has become its speciality.As many small bakery shops began to disappear from the high street, customer demand for Spencers’ bread did not fade, leading to the opening of its first retail outlet in 1994. Currently run by the third generation of the family, Ian Spencer and his sister Yvonne Leeson, who were literally brought up in the bakery, the pair have been in joint control since 1992 and also have their three offspring working alongside them.Old-fashioned waySo what makes Spencers’ bread so special? “It’s the flavour, because we make it the old-fashioned way,” says Ian. “We don’t mass-produce anything here. Everything is baked using our own recipes and we don’t use any mixes at all. We are scratch bakers. Our dough is fermented for an hour before we weigh it off. The whole process, until it goes into the oven, takes around four hours.”The business is split between 60% wholesale and 40% retail. The main bulk of the wholesale side is producing bread rolls for the numerous sandwich vans and roadside cafés on the industrial and retail estates in Loughborough and the surrounding towns.The bakery uses two tonnes of flour a week, supplied by Greens Flour Mills and EB Bradshaw & Sons of Driffield, and includes white, brown and Granary. Bread includes large and small tins, bloomers, French sticks and so many different types of roll, it is difficult to count. Everything is made at the bakery, including morning goods and cakes. Products are then delivered, using a fleet of four vans, to sandwich vans and small outlets or taken to the Spencers’ shop.Sausage rolls are made once a week, using handmade puff pastry and locally sourced sausage meat. They are frozen and then baked-off daily. Meat pies are not produced due to the complex health and hygiene regulations governing raw meat.Spencers’ reputation has spread by word of mouth and trade has consistently built up over the years. The company does not advertise – not even its name on the side of its vans. Customers approach Spencers for its business and not the other way round.The firm boasts 160 wholesale customers. Ian knows this because he sends out the invoices every Monday with his van drivers and the money is always collected by the end of the week. There are no bad debtors.Retail ventureThe company had always supplied independent retailers in the small town of Shepshed, which is five miles from the bakery. But as their numbers dwindled the family saw an opportunity, deciding to expand the empire and open a shop of their own, which they did in 1994.Ian says: “We found the right premises – it had been an old printing shop and we completely gutted and fitted it out as a shop. It’s gone from strength to strength.” Sandwiches are freshly made at the shop in a purpose-built preparation room. The lunchtime trade is based on filled rolls. Pupils from the local secondary school are key customers so accompaniments such as crisps, cakes and drinks are also in demand.The shop is equipped with a microwave, so bacon and sausages are cooked at the bakery in the morning and then delivered to the shop to be reheated at lunchtime.Orders for celebration cakes are generated through the shop and crafted at the bakery by a dedicated decorator. Ian has decided against making organic bread for several reasons. “We’re quite busy enough with our bread. We have had the opportunity to diversify with an organic range, but personally I don’t think it’s worth it. Organic is an expensive way of buying food and there’s no guarantee that it is what people say it is. Personally, I don’t think you can beat natural, good quality ingredients.”The business was started by Ian’s grandfather Herbert (although he was always known as Everard) then his father Reg and uncles Fred and Eric joined the business. The family owned a smallholding and lived in a several cottages on the site – the bakery was made by converting an outbuilding.There have been two refurbishments of the bakery. One was to extend the premises in the 1970s and the other was buying new equipment. Ian says: “As we’ve grown, we’ve had to buy larger machines and adjust our recipes slightly.” Ian’s daughter Lisa has already clocked up 10 years in the family firm, while son Liam is the ‘computer whizz’ of the family and is currently in the process of developing an accounts system. They work alongside Yvonne’s son Christopher.As well as family members, there are 15 staff, nine full- and six part-time. There is not a huge turnover of staff, says Ian. “We didn’t employ anyone until the 1970s and over the last 30 years all the staff who have ever worked here have been very loyal to me.”So over the years have they experienced much competition? “There are other bakers who do wholesale deliveries and one or two have tried to step on our toes and take our customers away from us,” says Ian. “But they have not been successful – we can hold our own. One of the secrets of our success is that we have not grown too big. I think that is where people get into trouble.”Expansion plansWhen Spencers opened the Shepshed shop other small bakers in the area included Mr Bun’s, Jordan’s, Coombes and Hampshire’s. Now, only the Leicester-based Hampshire’s and Spencers is left. So are there any plans for more shops? “We’re quite happy with just the one, but I wouldn’t mind opening another nearby, probably in East Leake, which is a few miles away, but only if the right property came up.”Ian firmly believes that the resurrection of the small independent retailer on the high street will happen. However, the difficulty lies in finding skilled staff to run a craft bakery.“Youngsters these days don’t want to get up at some unearthly hour to start work and they certainly don’t want to be working through the night when they could be out enjoying themselves,” he says. Another major problem is the lack of quality bakery training courses. Spencers trains most of its staff in-house, where Ian feels they get a much better education than in most of the bakery schools. “The NVQ they do at college these days is nothing compared to the City and Guilds I did when I was there,” he says. “That used to cover everything; now it is split into different categories. Students can choose to do what they want, instead of learning how to do everything and then specialising. “Added to that, it is very expensive and smaller employers cannot afford to send their trainees to do the course.”He adds that the prevalence of bakery mixes has also helped to drain skills from the industry. “I genuinely believe that if there are skilled bakers who take pride in producing good quality items, there will always be a customer base waiting,” he says. “It would be great to see the small baker make a return to the high street.”Looking to the future, Ian jokes that he would like to be sitting under a palm tree in 10 years, but concedes that he will probably still be hard at work at his oven. “I’d definitely like to open another shop. If the youngsters are still interested and want to carry it on, then we shall still be going,” he says. “I enjoy working, I just couldn’t sit around all day doing nothing. I like doing practical things such as woodworking and also like my horse racing, but very rarely get much time to enjoy it.” Family manWorking the hours he does, starting at 3am, except on Thursdays and Fridays when he begins at 10.30pm, Ian does not get much chance to have a social life. “But I love being with my family when I get home in the evenings and at the weekends it’s great to spend time with them. We are all very close.”So, when Ian and Yvonne eventually retire, who will take over? “There’s a question!” he laughs. “I think it will probably stay in joint ownership – just like it is now.”last_img read more

Read More »

Mendoza students aid local Montessori school

first_imgFour Mendoza College of Business students are applying project management skills learned at Notre Dame to a local Montessori school. Juniors Stephanie Boggs, Patrick Cotter, Barbara Smith and Devlin Lynch are using professor Corey Angst’s Project Management class to help Good Shepherd Montessori School increase enrollment. Good Shepherd develops a child’s love of learning through a unique combination of Catholic social teaching and Montessori teaching methods, according to co-founder and director of community relations Felicia Leon-Driscoll. She and her husband, co-founder Daniel W. Driscoll, established the school after studying at Notre Dame. “We’re doing what Notre Dame taught us,” Leon-Driscoll said. “We’re applying the principle of Catholic Social Teaching to our work and our lives, [taking] the preferential option for the poor and [making] the world a place where it is an easier place to be good.” Room exists for improvement and expansion from the 16 students the school had when it opened 10 years ago, Leon-Driscoll said. Good Shepherd wants to increase class size, with the immediate goal of generating enough interest to open a preschool classroom. “Our goal is to attract 20 new elementary-age students and 15 new preschoolers,” Leon- Driscoll said. “That will make a huge difference.” Through the Project Management course, students, including Boggs’ group, will apply what they learn in the classroom directly to real world experience after choosing their clients from a list of interested organizations, Angst said. “We want to send the message to the students that you can do good things, support whatever mission you want, if you generate enough revenue to be able to do those things,” Angst said. Boggs’ group plans to capitalize on Good Shepherd’s strong connection with Notre Dame to help it achieve its goals, she said. “A lot of the parents at the school are connected to the University,” Boggs said. One of those parents is Christina Wolbrecht, professor of political science at Notre Dame. Wolbrecht said she chose Good Shepherd because the school embodies a number of values really important to her family. “The basic teaching philosophy of the school really emphasizes independence, exploration and love of learning,” Wolbrecht said. “What we really like about this philosophy is that it recognizes each child as unique, and lets the child work both at the pace and in the way that works best for [them].” Driscoll, who acts as head of Good Shepherd, said his school embodies the Montessori mission to stimulate children’s minds and natural intellectual creativity. “The first and foremost vision of a Montessori school is to create a world of peace,” Driscoll said. “We want to create an environment that allows a child to be self-confident, directed, motivated and to love the universe so much that it opens a new type of world.”last_img read more

Read More »

Full Cast & Creative Team Set for Our Mother’s Brief Affair

first_imgCasting is now complete for the upcoming New York premiere of Our Mother’s Brief Affair, starring the previously announced Tony winner Linda Lavin. Directed by Lynne Meadow, performances will begin on December 28 at Manhattan Theatre Club’s Samuel J. Friedman Theatre. Opening night is set for January 20, 2016.Joining Lavin will be Kate Arrington (Grace, The Qualms) as Abby, Greg Keller (Of Good Stock, Belleville) as Seth and John Procaccino (An Enemy of the People, Incident at Vichy) as Lover/Dad.Written by Richard Greenberg, Our Mother’s Brief Affair follows Anna (Lavin), who, while on the verge of death (again), confesses to her grown children about an affair from her past. Anna fights for her legacy as her family attempts to distinguish fact from fiction.The production will feature scenic design by Santo Loquasto, costume design by Tom Broecker, lighting design by Peter Kaczorowski and sound design by Fitz Patton. Our Mother’s Brief Affair View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on March 6, 2016 Related Showslast_img read more

Read More »

Electricity usage fall-off indicates serious recession

first_imgElectricity usage fall-off indicates serious recession FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享New York Times:New data on electricity use in the past three weeks suggest a sharp decline in U.S. economic activity on par with that of the Great Recession. It may already be the deepest downturn since the Great Depression; it is certainly the fastest.These numbers are important because our official statistics can’t keep pace with the abrupt economic changes the coronavirus shutdown has caused. All those closed stores, silenced factories and darkened office buildings are yet to be counted in the government’s official economic numbers, which take months to collect, process and report.But evidence of the sharp economic shift shows up in a large and rapid decline in electricity usage over recent weeks.The numbers come from a new electricity-based measure that Steve Cicala, an economics professor at the University of Chicago, has devised to track the state of the economy and how it changes from day to day. The idea of tracking electricity usage, he says, follows from the observation that most economic activity requires electricity.Mr. Cicala’s results conform with a similar analysis from the U.S. Energy Information Administration and from reports by regional electricity providers. “In terms of this scale of event, I don’t think we’ve had in recent history anything like this hit the grid,” said April Lee, an analyst at the E.I.A.Mr. Cicala said his indicator was useful in times of rapid economic change, adding, “While this isn’t a perfect measure, it certainly helps with filling in the gap so that we can get the most complete picture.”[Quoctrung Bui, Justin Wolfers]More: Another Way to See the Recession: Power Usage Is Way Downlast_img read more

Read More »

Uniondale Man Arrested for Crossing Guard Hit-and-run

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A Uniondale man has been arrested for allegedly hitting a female crossing guard who was helping schoolchildren cross a street in Hempstead and fleeing the scene last month, Nassau County police said.Kenechukwu Okoli was charged Tuesday with assault and leaving the scene of an accident.Police said the 59-year-old hit the Hempstead village police crossing guard in the leg while driving a Mercedes Benz northbound on Henry Street shortly before 8 a.m. Nov. 20.The victim, who was knocked to the ground, was taken to a local hospital, where she was treated for contusions to her knee and hip.Okoli will be arraigned Jan. 78 at First District Court in Hempstead.last_img read more

Read More »

How A Long Island Couple’s Journey to Help Syrian Refugees Changed Their Life

first_imgA family they met in Greece recently called Latifa via the popular messaging app WhatsApp to update the couple on their progress: They had made it to Germany. But the family wanted more, Latifa says. They want to come to America.Given the rise of Islamophobia in America, which some Muslim rights groups have linked to xenophobic comments uttered during this presidential election season, Latifa told the family that the time wasn’t right. She wishes it were.“Why can’t we open our hearts and our minds?” Latifa says. “I met at least 1,500 to 2,000 people personally. I talked to them, engaged with them. None of them had any sign of being a terrorist or being ISIS or being whatever this creepy Donald Trump is talking about.”“They are desperate for their lives,” she says.Now home for about two months, Colin says he’s disappointed by the European Union’s recent agreement with Turkey to empower authorities in Greece to return refugees arriving there back to Turkey.“To say Turkey is a safe place for refugees is cynical at best and murderous at worst,” Colin exclaims.Colin is not alone in expressing bitter disappointment about the Europeans’ response.“In their desperation to seal their borders, EU leaders have willfully ignored the simplest of facts: Turkey is not a safe country for Syrian refugees and is getting less safe by the day,” said John Dalhuisen, Amnesty International’s Director for Europe and Central Asia, on the human right’s groups website.Thinking back to their own journey, the Woodhouses remembered a young Afghan named Jaweed, whom Latifa first met at Camp Moria, after primal cries thundering out of his tiny body alerted her to his presence.Jaweed had slogged through brutally cold temperatures in the mountains abutting Iran and Iraq. As his family waded through the snow, Jaweed’s unprotected hands had developed severe frostbite. By the time he made it to Camp Moria, each hand was the size of a watermelon.As Latifa comforted the family, Colin grabbed the boy and rushed him to a nearby clinic, where doctors gave him drugs to numb the pain. Eventually he was taken to volunteer-run refugee site called Camp Pikpa, where people with serious maladies can get special care.It was at Camp Pikpa where Jaweed’s family finally had the chance to bid a formal farewell to his grandmother, who had frozen to death in the mountains. Unable to carry her body the whole way, they buried her in the snow and continued their struggle to survive.As for Jaweed, the Woodhouses are not sure what happened to him. One day they went to the camp only to learn that his family had taken him. Apparently the boy’s father was worried that a surgeon would amputate Jaweed’s hands.But with the help of social media, they discovered that a boy matching Jaweed’s description had been admitted to a Doctors Without Borders facility in Athens.Many of the refugees they met along the way shared similar stories of survival or heartbreak. Some said they had no choice to but to flee violence. And now many had dreams of making it to Germany.But the most ambitious request the Woodhouses kept getting they could not fulfill.One refugee after another would ask them: “Could you take us to America?”They had to leave them behind. Now back on LI, the Woodhouses say they’re committed to continuing their work, which includes help establishing a network of translators to help bridge the communication gap at refugee camps. And they can hope that one day they can give the refugees a better answer.“We are strengthened as a nation by the people we open our hearts to and our borders to,” Colin says. “And that’s what’s made America great.” Embed from Getty Images Embed from Getty Images Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York [dropcap]A[/dropcap]s they soared over the Greek island of Lesbos, Colin and Latifa Woodhouse of Great Neck peered through the plane’s tiny window and were struck by the sight of life preservers strewn along the shore of the Aegean Sea—which, as the legend goes, bears the name of an Amazonian Queen swallowed up by the sprawling body of water.It wasn’t until they landed that the Woodhouses truly began to comprehend the enormity of the refugee crisis engulfing Europe. Yet here they were, 5,000 miles from home, ready to take on the greatest migration of people since World War II.“Wow,” Colin recalled as the plane made its final approach, “this is big time.”Like the overcrowded dinghies making the treacherous four-mile trip from Turkey to Lesbos, the discarded life preservers tell the tale of countless lives lost, dreams shattered, children literally ripped from the arms of desperate parents by a ferocious sea that even a Queen of the Amazons was ill-fit to conquer. But for those fortunate to survive the perilous crossing, these life preservers tell a story of hope, perseverance and a future free of fear of bloodshed.In late January, the Woodhouses—Colin a financial advisor and Latifa a retired New York City school teacher and college professor—made the decision to put their own lives on hold and instead donate their time to helping war-stricken refugees seeking a better life in Europe. The couple was not alone: their daughter Alexandra and friend Diane Lombardi, a doctor, also joined in the cause.The Woodhouses echo migrants and organizations on the ground that say they need all the help they can get dealing with this historic refugee crisis.The flow of refugees was initially so overwhelming that Europe was caught flat-footed. According to the International Rescue Committee, 60 million people are displaced worldwide, which is the equivalent the entire population of Italy fleeing their homes. Twelve million of those displaced are from war-ravaged Syria, which has been upended by a five-year-old civil war and the rise of the self-proclaimed Islamic State. Half are children. Like the three-year-old whose body washed ashore on a Turkish beach after his boat overcrowded with refugees had capsized in the Aegean. The photo of his drowned tiny corpse became an iconic image of the ongoing catastrophe.Syrians aren’t the only migrants seeking asylum in Europe or the United States, however. Iraqis, Afghans, Pakistanis, South Sudanese and Nigerians have also absconded from their homelands. The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees said in March that since 2015 more than one million refugees have crossed into Greece.“I had never seen hell, but tonight, it was worse than hell. I thought I died. But I’m alive, I’m alive.”While the European Union and Turkey reached a deal this February to stem the flow of migrants to Greece, much to the dismay of human rights organization, the United States’ response has been largely relegated to providing humanitarian aid on the ground and in Syria, to the tune of $5.1 billion since the conflict started in March 2011.American politicians turned the refugee crisis into a political hot potato last year when more than two dozen US governors said they’d refuse to welcome any Syrians, the majority of whom are Muslim, into their respective states. Still, the Obama administration stuck to its plan to admit 10,000 refugees, a tiny fraction of the millions escaping bloodshed, beheadings, rape, sexual slavery, immolation and countless other atrocities. The country that has been most welcoming to refugees has been Germany, which has accepted more than a million migrants.Colin, for one, is profoundly disappointed in how the US government has responded to hordes of people escaping violence.“We’re a country that was founded as being a safe haven from persecution,” Colin says. “That’s at the very core of the principles of this country, and to turn away an extremely vulnerable population is not only against our legal obligations, but it’s immoral.”The challenge facing Greece is much more complicated because refugees are using the economically strapped nation as a springboard to countries with better job prospects. They have no desire to stay there. At its height last year, 5,000 refugees were arriving in Greece each day.For the Woodhouses, traveling to Lesbos was a no-brainer even though there were plenty of nonprofit organizations already in Greece with the bandwidth to respond to such a calamity. When the Woodhouses boarded their plane on Jan. 24, they had little clue just how much they were needed.What began as a simple humanitarian mission quickly evolved into a spiritual exploration in which the couple met strangers that would become life-long friends, not crazed terrorists, and discovered how the simplest of deeds can be met with boundless expressions of gratitude. For every person they helped, there was an entire family waiting to say thanks. And with each passing day their commitment to the cause never waned, despite periods of disappointment that they could not do more.Here is the story of their journey.AFGHAN HILLThe Woodhouse family from Great Neck traveled to Lesbos, Greece to provide assistance to Syrian refugees in January. From left to right: Alexandra Woodhouse, Latifa Woodhouse and Colin Woodhouse. (Photo credit: Latifa Woodhouse/Facebook)If a photo could speak, the image of a rain-soaked young Afghan girl pressed up against a chain-link fence during a deluge would cry out in pain.“That was the breaking point for me,” Colin tells the Press from inside the couple’s Great Neck home, recalling the moment he felt inspired to act.Instead of wrestling to remove the heart-wrenching image from their minds, the Woodhouses decided to use it as motivation.Looking at the refugees, Latifa saw her own family, who had fled political persecution following the Soviet Union’s invasion of Afghanistan and were granted asylum in the US.“Being a daughter of refugees and going through that with [the] Russian invasion, I knew first hand what it was like,” says Latifa, who met Colin in Afghanistan, where he was teaching at Kabul University.This crisis was personal.So they began to make preparations to fly to Lesbos. The Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Shelter Rock, where Latifa is a member of the board of trustees, approved a $200,000 crisis grant to be split evenly between the Unitarian Universalist Service Committee and the Syrian Medical Staff in Syria. The Unitarian Universalist Service Committee has separately contributed $600,000 to grassroots partners on the ground providing humanitarian aid. The Woodhouses on their own were able to raise $16,000 that they used to deliver aid to refugees in Lesbos. “It’s a fundamental human right that people who are victims of persecution are able to flee their country and enjoy asylum.”Armed with the $16,000 they raised to assist for the relief effort and 250 pounds of Patagonia jackets to hand-deliver to frostbitten and weary migrants, the Woodhouses landed in Lesbos. On average, the mercury in Lesbos typically hovers around 50 degrees in January. But the day after they arrived it was “shockingly cold” on the Greek island, Colin recalls. Smoke billowed over the camp as refugees burnt wood inside their tents to stay warm.Even the Woodhouses couldn’t escape the elements, with winds whipping through their hotel room, sending a shiver through their bodies.With little access to heat—a luxury in Lesbos—the Woodhouses turned to humanitarian work to warm their hearts.What they saw when they took stock of the flood of arrivals was extraordinary.Scores of volunteers would greet refugees as they came ashore, oftentimes offering blankets or a new pair of socks. Many of the incoming dinghies, meant to comfortably hold about 25 passengers, would be brimming with up to 80 people. Those who arrived safely would be directed to a fleet of buses destined for Camp Moria, where the Greek government was stationed to register newly arriving migrants.“We can die in our country or we can die to find safe sanctuary,” Colin says, describing the mindset of those embarking on the dangerous journey to Europe. If safely crossing the Aegean was not taxing enough, refugees would face yet another obstacle as they came ashore: a debilitating language barrier.Latifa, who speaks Farsi, Pashtun and a little broken Arabic, realized her language skills could be a useful tool to help jittery refugees.At one point she spotted a dazed and confused 10-year-old Afghan girl wrapped in a blanket.“We thought, ‘Is she alive or is she dead?’” Latifa recalls.When Lombardi, the doctor, approached the girl, all she could offer was an inaudible mumble. Latifa attempted to speak to the girl in Farsi. It worked.“Khala Jaan,” the girl told Latifa, meaning “Dear Aunt”—a term of endearment.Finally able to connect with someone, the girl opened up.“We read in books about hell, what hell is like,” she told Latifa. “I had never seen hell, but tonight, it was worse than hell. I thought I died. But I’m alive. I’m alive.”The number of people unable to communicate with volunteers because of the lack of translators highlighted just how difficult it was for refugees to continue their journey. If they couldn’t get even basic instructions, Latifa wondered, what were they supposed to do?Then Latifa realized she could be the voice for war-weary refugees who otherwise would not be able to get a word across.At one point she came upon an Iraqi family who had been shuttled to the camp by UN representatives who left them with scant instruction about what to do next.“Why are you sitting here?” she asked the family in their native tongue.The family, one woman explained, had been brought to the camp but were not advised about what to do next. She told Latifa about her sister-in-law’s husband who was slaughtered and all the things they had to leave behind.“We had a house,” the woman said through her tears. “We had everything.”While Latifa was honing her translating skills, Colin and volunteers from other countries were busy building trenches and alleyways to improve the flow of traffic in the camp. The volunteers may have had their own difficulties communicating but once Colin produced a hammer, everyone seemed to know what to do.Colin quickly observed that refugees at Afghan Hill needed wider steps to make access to the medical tent easier. He and other volunteers working on the project dubbed it, “Stairs to Europe.” Colin solved the lack of lighting by going to the local hardware store and purchasing some solar lights, which he helped install.“There was this communication of two guys that can handle a tool,” he says.If translating or building new steps wasn’t possible, the Woodhouses found other ways to contribute. The money they raised helped pay for food, clothes, bus tickets and ambulance rides from Athens to Macedonia.Or they’d do little things to lift up the spirits of children by handing out stuffed animals or soccer balls.“We felt pretty good because we were able to get people on their way,” Colin says.Jillian Tuck, senior program leader for Rights at Risk at the Unitarian Universalist Service Committee, a nonsecretarian global human rights group, said the organization launched a refugee crisis fund almost immediately after the crisis began to unfold, raising $600,000. The money would be funneled out to the UUSC’s partners that operate in the impacted area. The UUSC is currently funding about nine organizations there.“It’s a fundamental human right that people who are victims of persecution are able to flee their country and enjoy asylum,” Tuck says.SNOWY GRAVEIn the wake of the Paris attacks in November that killed 130 people, more than half of the governors in the US reacted angrily at President Obama’s proposal to admit 10,000 Syrian refugees into the country. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, a Republican, even said orphans under the age of five weren’t welcome in the Garden State.In his letter to Obama, U.S. Rep. Peter King (R-Seaford), questioned the vetting process that refugees undergo.“The recent terrorist attacks in Paris have shown the extent of ISIS’s brutality and ability to conduct a major attack in the West,” King wrote. “There is no denying that the current process through which the United States screens and admits Syrian refugees presents ISIS with an opportunity to transport operatives to carry out attacks in the United States.”The hysteria over ISIS fighters potentially masquerading as Syrian refugees led to a since-debunked social media-stoked rumor alleging that the Catholic Church’s humanitarian arm was in the process of building a “tent city” in Amityville to house refugees. At the time there were no applications to bring these refugees to Nassau or Suffolk counties, according to Catholic Charities.What the Woodhouses observed on the ground in Lesbos is very different from the suggestions ricocheting through cable news and the Internet.last_img read more

Read More »

Sam Mewis: Man City Women star modelling her game on Kevin De Bruyne | Football News

first_imgOne of the reasons Mewis decided to come to England was the historic club rivalries which do not exist stateside.“Getting to experience the Man Utd rivalry is going to be awesome,” she said.“I’m really excited to experience that part of being here, the rivalries are historic and I look forward to those games.“All the opponents are top competitors so any game is a great opportunity to learn and grow as a player. I’m excited to experience all the opportunities I am getting here.” Mewis described playing for Man City Women as an honour and revealed she does watch De Bruyne to help mould her own game.“I have seen him around a couple of times, but not properly met him, no. I am a fan, who isn’t?,” she told the Women’s Football Show.“He is an incredible player and I would try to model my play on him anytime. It’s been a great honour to be here so far.” – Advertisement – Manchester City Women’s Sam Mewis says she tries to model her game on Kevin De Bruyne.The USA midfielder joined Manchester City this summer as one of a number of high-profile arrivals in the Women’s Super League.- Advertisement – Sam Mewis celebrates her opening goal for Man City in the Women's FA Cup final – Advertisement – Georgia Stanway, Sam Mewis and Janine Beckie of Manchester City celebrate with the Vitality Women's FA Cup Trophy following their team's victory in the Vitality Women's FA Cup Final match between Everton Women and Manchester City Women at Wembley Stadium on November 01, 2020 in London, England.– Advertisement –center_img Manchester City’s Sam Mewis says it was an honour to lift the FA Cup trophy following the victory against Everton at Wembley 0:32 She became just the third American to score a goal in an FA Cup final, following Carli Lloyd and Christian Pulisic, as Gareth Taylor’s squad beat Everton in extra-time at Wembley last weekend.“I’m very fortunate, I keep [the women’s FA Cup winners’ medal] right by my bedside table. It was such an honour to play in a final and win with my team-mates. I feel lucky and fortunate.“It was super exciting, a great ball in from Alex and something we had been working on all week.”Mewis relishing historic Manchester derby 0:32 Manchester City’s Sam Mewis says she’s excited about the rivalry with Manchester United and is looking forward to the Manchester derbieslast_img read more

Read More »