BA pays the price for its air of indifference

first_imgBA pays the price for its air of indifferenceOn 5 Aug 2003 in Personnel Today The unofficial walkout of British Airways (BA) ground service staff atHeathrow with all its attendant damage was a salutary warning to the airlineindustry and everybody beyond. For years, surveys of employee satisfaction have been pointing to a steadygrowth of disaffection, reflected in the election of a generation of avowedlymore aggressive trade union leaders. But what has propelled this shift is notso much a new militancy, as a demand for respect – a widespread feelingexpressing itself through industrial relations. That presents a major challenge to the HR community, but it is also anopportunity. The BA dispute bubbled up from below. None of the unions negotiating aboutthe introduction of swipe cards for months beforehand guessed that theirmembers were this ready to act. It was certainly a surprise to BA. Had BAmanagement the slightest hint that the enforced introduction of swipe cardswould lead to £40m of lost revenues and tens of millions more in lostreputation, it would not have acted in such a self-defeating manner. After all,20,000 other workers within BA had already accepted the new system. The trigger for this unexpected storm was not so much the monitoring ofattendance; it was apprehension that the new technology would permit awholesale recasting of the workplace bargain – on BA’s terms and time-schedule– and that workers would have no say in the matter. And on top of poor pay, ifwork was to be distributed around the rhythm of customer demand, then workerswould have been reduced to little more than automata. This is where the question of respect kicks in. Of course there was fearabout change and further intensification of the pace of work without additionalcompensation. But what made the reaction so highly charged was the sense thatthe whole approach showed how BA regarded the workforce. Any durable solution to these types of disputes must involve systems andprocesses the workforce trusts – that gives them a voice in how the workplacebargain is to be reshaped. Thus the traditionalist collective bargaining dealcannot always offer a sustainable position. It needs processes involving thetransmission of information and consultation in a way that encourages genuineemployee input to how working practices are shaped. BA needs a more European, social partnership approach to organising workthan either our unions or management are ready to accept. Tony Woodley,designated successor to Sir Bill Morris at the Transport & General WorkersUnion, said unions musn’t get too close “to the gaffer” – and Britishmanagements do cherish their autonomy and discretion. The implementation of the EU directive on information and consultation ispainfully slow, and there is a respect deficit out there. Now is the time forHR to make the case for pre-emptive action to mitigate the risk of being in thesame position as BA was. By Will Hutton, chief executive, The Work Foundation Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. last_img read more

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Compass slams REBNY with antitrust suit

first_img Email Address* The complaint focuses on part of the agreement that governs communications between agents and their sellers if they move to a new firm. Specifically, agents are barred from further contact with their clients if they leave the firm where the exclusive listing agreement was signed.Compass claims this provision is enforced in a “discriminatory manner” against it, and claims this “directly limits” its recruitment efforts and ability to grow its market share in New York City.The firm singled out Howard Lorber, Elliman’s executive chairman, as being particularly “instrumental” in getting the provision adopted.While Compass has been in legal spats with competitors on and off since launching in 2013, its suit against REBNY is a direct rebuke of the industry’s main trade group at a particularly sensitive time for the IPO-bound brokerage.“Compass’ lawsuit is surprising, disappointing and misplaced,” REBNY president James Whelan said in a statement. “Compass’ point of contention is with New York State law. Instead, Compass takes issue with REBNY co-brokering rules which are based on current State law and which Compass has helped shape and enforce.”REBNY hasn’t been sued by a member since 2004.Compass agents and executives sit on several of REBNY’s residential committees, which oversee policies including the universal co-brokerage agreement. REBNY’s residential members must follow the agreement to access its syndicated listing feed, the Residential Listing Service.Three Compass employees are part of the REBNY committee dedicated to the regulating and enforcing the agreement: Valentina Shenderovich, Compass’ associate general counsel; Emily Whitney, senior legal counsel for the firm; and Rory Golod, Compass’ regional president of the Tri-State area, who has been on the committee for at least two years, according to a source familiar with the matter.In its complaint, Compass argues that Elliman and Corcoran have “disproportionate” representation on REBNY boards that allows them to “control any policy or rule changes.”Representatives for Compass and Elliman declined to comment. A spokesperson for Corcoran called Compass’ claims “fiction,” and pointed to Compass’ continued efforts to force its parent company’s lawsuit against it into arbitration at REBNY. “Yet, Compass now claims Corcoran is supposedly conspiring with REBNY,” the representative said.(Corcoran’s parent, Realogy, sued Compass in July 2019, alleging that Compass engaged in “illicit” business practices and “predatory” poaching. Compass filed a countersuit this January, accusing the company and its subsidiaries of unfair competition and defamation.)Tensions over listings between the firms, and REBNY’s involvement, are longstanding. It was previously reported that REBNY fined Compass $1,000 in 2018, but the complaint disclosed the total fines REBNY levied against the firm for UCBA violations that year was $34,000. Beyond the charges, competing firms have been urging the trade organization to take further action against Compass for years.In a heated 2018 meeting, REBNY president John Banks and brokerage heads discussed Compass’ alleged practice of giving its new recruits a form to share with clients to urge them to transfer the listing to their new firm. (In New York, when a client decides to sell their home, they sign an exclusive listing agreement with the brokerage, not the agent. When an agent switches firms, bringing their exclusive listings with them often becomes a point of negotiation.)The meeting, which was attended by Douglas Elliman’s Howard Lorber and Halstead’s Diane Ramirez among others, was the second meeting among REBNY leadership and brokerage heads regarding the issue in a matter of months.At the time, Ramirez said REBNY’s residential brokerage board of directors was taking action by introducing changes to the UCBA to include more specific rules and penalties in order to ensure greater compliance.In the complaint, Compass says it was barred from participating in the process: Golod was allegedly turned away from a 2019 meeting in which revisions to the UCBA were to be discussed. (Golod was trying to attend in the place of Compass’ designated representative, who was unable to attend due to personal reasons, according to the complaint.)The new measures, which penalize inaccurate data and bad business behavior, were adopted in early 2019. In the complaint, Compass argued the revisions were made to prevent property owners from choosing to continue working with their agent at their new firm, and in doing so hamper Compass recruitment efforts and stifle competition.Compass also alleged that Corcoran and Elliman frustrated its attempts to recruit specific agents by refusing to release former agents’ listings even when Compass offered to pay “exceptionally generous offers,” but would “routinely” release listings when agents moved to a firm other than Compass.Compass is seeking damages for lost business, defined in terms of recruitment and sales. The brokerage disclosed $270 million in losses last year and a 56 increase in revenue in its IPO prospectus.Contact Erin Hudson Compass’ Robert Reffkin and REBNY’s James Whelan. (Getty, Whelan ph: Anuja Shakya)The Real Estate Board of New York represents the interests of the city’s many residential brokerages. Compass says it’s not one of them.The brokerage alleges in a new lawsuit that REBNY has conspired with Douglas Elliman and the Corcoran Group to “thwart” its business in New York City. The complaint was filed in federal court for the Southern District of New York Friday afternoon. (Elliman and Corcoran are not defendants in the case, but are cited throughout.)Compass said it was bringing the suit to “halt REBNY and its co-conspirators’ anticompetitive scheme, release from their market dominance, and reinvigorate the competitive process.”At the core of the tension is the universal co-brokerage agreement (UCBA), which dictates how agents share listings. Compass alleges the UCBA and the REBNY committees tasked with enforcing it are being weaponized by Corcoran and Elliman to stymie Compass’ growth in a bid to keep the legacy brokerages and the trade organization on top.ADVERTISEMENTMeanwhile, REBNY — and Compass’ competitors — have claimed that the firm has repeatedly violated the agreement. In January, REBNY fined Compass $250,000, citing “repeated violations” of the agreement for improperly pursuing competitors’ exclusives. Compass managers were also required to undergo further training to learn about the agreement and REBNY’s code of ethics.Read moreREBNY slaps Compass with $250K fineCompass accuses Realogy of lying, cheating and stealingInside Compass’ S-1: How it measures the upside of its tech Tags Message* Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Full Name* Share via Shortlink breakingcompassCorcoran GroupDouglas EllimanReal Estate LawsuitsREBNYResidential BrokerageResidential Real Estatelast_img read more

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Industry suffers setback in 421a class action suit

first_img Full Name* “This decision is a colossal setback, not just for the landlord in this case, but for the real estate lobby who tried and failed to get it dismissed,” Aaron Carr, the founder of HRI, said in an email. “The real estate lobby is concerned that if this class action is successful, our organization will investigate every single landlord that is cheating on their 421a tax benefits. And they are correct.”At the heart of the lawsuits is the question of whether it’s legal to offer concessions on the initial rent for a unit in the 421a program. If the tenants prevail, the outcome of these cases would have widespread implications for developers using 421a and offering concessions to renters.In a joint statement, Real Estate Board of New York, the Community Housing Improvement Program and the Rent Stabilization Association — which had filed a motion to appear in support of several of the landlords and argued for the tenants’ complaints to be dismissed — said the decision in Spruce Capital’s case was based on the “favorable presumptions afforded by law to the plaintiffs” and does not answer or address the legal arguments put forward by the landlords’ attorney or the industry.“As the case advances, we fully expect the Court to find that rent concessions are important government-endorsed tools to help recompense tenants in times of inconvenience,” the groups said in the statement.Nativ Winiarsky, a partner at Kucker Marino Winiarsky & Bittens, is representing a landlord in one of the other six cases. He said it’s concerning that the court did not defer to the “long-standing” precedent set by the Division of Homes and Community Renewal to permit limited rent concessions.“Needless to say, given the large-scale impact of these decisions, it will no doubt only ultimately be resolved at the appellate levels and possibly the Court of Appeals,” said Winiarsky in an email.A representative for Spruce Capital did not immediately respond to request for comment.Additional reporting by Kathryn BrenzelContact Erin Hudson Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Message* Tags Share via Shortlink Email Address* 1209 Dekalb Avenue in Brooklyn. (iStock, Kutnicki Bernstein Architects)Tenants in a Bushwick building scored a victory against their landlord in court this week, which could be a harbinger of headaches to come for the real estate industry.A New York State Supreme Court judge ruled that the tenants’ suit, which accuses landlord Spruce Capital Partners of rent overcharges at 1209 Dekalb Avenue, would continue. The landlord and three influential trade groups had petitioned the court to dismiss the case.It’s one of seven separate cases where tenants are seeking class action status against landlords who received 421a tax abatements and then allegedly illegally inflated rents at their properties. The complaints were filed in the past seven months after investigations by the watchdog group Housing Rights Initiative.Though the judge’s decision in Spruce Capital’s case does not bind judges in the other cases, tenant advocates see it as a positive development.ADVERTISEMENTRead moreLawmakers vow to end 421a as tenants sue landlords getting tax breakFour Brooklyn landlords accused of illegally inflating rentsRent overcharge cases pile up 421abrooklynHousing MarketQueensReal Estate LawsuitsResidential Real Estatelast_img read more

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Shore Medical Center Names Registrar Deborah Beall its February Employee of the Month

first_imgShore Medical Center is proud to announce administration registrar Deborah Beall of Egg Harbor City is its February Employee of the Month. For consistently delivering outstanding patient-centered service and embodying Shore Medical Center’s Mission, Vision and Values, Shore is proud to announce that Access Management Registrar Deb Beall has been named the medical center’s February 2018 Employee of the Month.Beall first began working at Shore in 2001 as a member of the Security Department. In October 2003 she transferred to Admissions, and has been a mainstay of the department ever since.As a member of Shore’s admissions team, Beall coordinates bed flow for the entire hospital during the evenings, never missing a beat even during the busiest times. Her colleagues describe her as the ultimate team player, always stepping up to lend coworkers a hand, or assisting in hospital-wide projects.“Deb comes in every day at the busiest time for patient movement. She is always proactive, and always a pleasure to work with,” says Nurse Manager Kelly Duma. “She does so much for us on a daily basis.”Beall credits her success to her love of working at Shore.“I’ve always appreciated my positions at Shore. Through the years, I have gotten to know so many people,” Beall stated. “I’ve learned from the best, and consider each day a blessing to work with my coworkers. I truly enjoy my job and look forward to coming to work every day.”A resident of Egg Harbor Township, Beall enjoys gardening, fishing, reading, going to the gym and volunteering with local animal rescues. She fosters and cares for animals of all types, including cats, dogs, birds, guinea pigs and even box turtles. Beall especially loves her dogs Chopper, Sally and Huggie Bear.About Shore Medical CenterAt Shore Medical Center, located in Somers Point, NJ, kindness complements an extraordinary level of clinical sophistication. People are the foundation of this modern medical center where advanced technology harmonizes with compassionate care. Shore Medical Center attracts the area’s best physicians, nurses and clinicians, and is the first and only hospital in New Jersey and one of 86 healthcare organizations worldwide to earn Designation as a Planetree Patient-Centered Care Hospital®. Recognized for its dedication to patient safety, Shore has received seven consecutive “A” grades in The Leapfrog Group’s Hospital Safety Score since Fall 2014.  Shore Medical Center is home to six Centers of Excellence for Cancer, Cardiovascular, Neurosciences, Spine and Orthopedic, Emergency and Maternity and Pediatric care. Shore’s affiliations include Penn Medicine, Onsite Neonatal Partners, St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children, Mayo Medical Laboratories, and Advanced Radiology Solutions. In addition, Shore is a member of the Jefferson Neuroscience Network and has physicians on staff from the Rothman Institute. In 2011, Shore opened its Pediatric Care Center, the first of its kind in New Jersey, and its state-of-the-art Surgical Pavilion and Campus Expansion. The Shore Medical Center Planned Giving& Development team, which includes the Auxiliary, creates and implements dynamic philanthropic programs that support the mission of Shore Medical Center (www.GivetoShore.org). For more information about Shore Medical Center, visit www.ShoreMedicalCenter.org.last_img read more

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Cereal sugar levels up on 2012

first_imgSugar lobbyists have found that some cereals contain more sugar than they did in 2012.Research by Action on Sugar revealed that, of 50 cereals analysed in 2012, the ones with the highest levels of sugar in have either increased or stayed the same. It said 14 out of the 50 cereals contained a third or more (≥33.3g/100g) sugar, or 8 teaspoons per 100g.The figures were compared to a 2012 Which? Breakfast Cereal Report, which revealed high amounts of free sugars in 50 breakfast cereals.As National Breakfast Week is in full swing this week, the organisation said it wanted to warn people of hidden sugar.Kawther Hashem, nutritionist at Action on Sugar, said: “You wouldn’t give your child chocolate biscuits for breakfast, yet certain manufacturers are effectively doing that for us. It is highly concerning that many parents are still buying cereal products for their children, thinking they are choosing healthier products, only to find these items are laden with excess sugar and calories.“We urge parents to make more informed food switches, such as choosing wholegrain breakfast cereals but not those coated with sugar or honey.  Adding fresh fruit to cereal can make it more appealing and also increase its nutritional value.”The organisation pointed out that high fibre, lower sugar and salt cereals can still play a part in a healthy diet.last_img read more

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Watch Bob Weir Join Jackie Greene For Sweetwater Music Hall Celebration

first_imgLast night marked a performance from Jackie Greene, who set up shop at the Sweetwater Music Hall in Mill Valley, CA. The guitar slinger delighted with songs from his newest release, before welcoming an old friend to the stage: Bob Weir.The Grateful Dead guitarist made his appearance as part of a birthday party celebration, sticking around to perform a handful of songs for the crowd. He joined in for a cover of the Temptations’ “Standing On Shaky Ground,” which you can watch below, courtesy of Adrienna Monique:Weir stayed on for “Digging A Hole” and “Sugaree,” as well as an encore version of “West L.A. Fadeaway.” Alex Nelson also joined in the fun, only adding to the magic.Here’s “Sugaree,” via Matthew Kann:Check out the full setlist below:Setlist: Jackie Greene Band at Sweetwater Music Hall, Mill Valley, CA – 3/21/16Set: The King Is Dead, I’m So Gone, Farewell So Long Goodbye, A Moment Of Temporary Color, Spooky Tina, Mexican Girl, Light Up Your Window, When You’re Walking Away, By The Side Of The Road, Shaken, So Hard To Find My Way, Standing On Shaky Ground*, Digging A Hole*, Sugaree*Encore: West L.A. Fadeaway** – w/ Bob Weir & Alex Nelsonlast_img read more

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PHOTOS: The Revivalists & The Marcus King Band In ATL

first_imgOn December 15 and 16, The Revivalists took over the amazing Tabernacle in Atlanta, GA for two nights of sonic bliss. With The Marcus King Band on the bill as support, fans were treated to back-to-back nights of The Deepest Dream Tour-closing madness. Check out the full gallery below, courtesy of photographer Emily Butler.The Revivalists will celebrate New Year’s Eve in their hometown of New Orleans at The Orpheum Theater on December 29, 30, and 31. For more information on The Revivalists, head to the band’s website.The Revivalists | The Tabernacle | Atlanta, GA | 12/16/17 | Photos by Emily Butler Load remaining imageslast_img read more

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Harvard Gazette’s top stories of 2018

first_imgFollow Harvard on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram to see more great moments from the past year. Milestones, innovation, analysis, and inspiration from the University and beyond Harvard Gazette’s top stories of 2017 Related The Year in PicturesThese were the stories that were too big for just words“The center in the crossroads”Students and staff embraced Harvard’s new Smith Campus Center.,“The ending as beginning: Commencement ‘18”There were cheers and tears at the 367th Commencement ceremony.,“Beauty in the eye of the microscope”by Rachel TraughberNew tools helped Harvard researchers display the world in unexpected and compelling ways.,“Playing The Game, both past and present”by Jon ChaseThe celebration transcended generations when Harvard beat Yale at Fenway Park.,“Catching up with the class of ‘48”by Jon ChaseA wonderful look at the lives of alumni at 90 and beyond.,Deep DivesThese were the in-depth stories that our readers couldn’t put down“‘What the hell — why don’t I just go to Harvard and turn my life upside down?’”by Colleen WalshPart of the Experience series, then-President Drew Faust opened up about family, history, and the illness that urged her forward.,“Onward and upward, robots”by Alvin PowellFirst in a series on cutting-edge research at Harvard, researchers showed off the unique approaches they are taking with robotics.,“‘The greatest gift you can have is a good education, one that isn’t strictly professional’”by Liz MineoHoward Gardner talked about his secret to a successful career and a happy life.“A summer of service to cities”by Christina PazzaneseThe Bloomberg Harvard City Leadership Initiative is working to help city officials be more effective and train the next generation.,“‘To be horrified by inequality and early death and not have any kind of plan for responding — that would not work for me’”by Alvin PowellPaul Farmer talked about making impoverished lives his life work.,Social MediaThese were the stories that we had to sharecenter_img As a new year approaches, we look back at some of the Gazette’s most-read and best-loved stories of 2018.Campus LifeThese were the stories that made us laugh, cry, and connect to each other“Facing the future, Lewis and Faust see reason for hope”by Alvin PowellIn a time of uncertainty, Congressman Lewis and then-President Faust urged the graduating class to rise to the challenge of a world in need of leadership.,“Harvard names Lawrence S. Bacow as 29th president”After an extensive search supported by faculty, students, staff, and alumni, Harvard welcomed its 29th president.,“Not just a humanities cat”by Rose LincolnAfter four years at Harvard, Remy the cat has had pretty much the full Harvard experience.,“It’s Housing Day, with snowballs”by Aaron GoldmanFirst-year students battled the snow to learn where they’d live next.,“When her life is over, she’ll have lived”by Jill RadskenHarvard senior Elsie Tellier uses courage, strength, sadness, and compassion to respond to her lethal disease.,“Spreading the word on college admissions”by Liz MineoHarvard students developed a college admissions guide to help others traverse the competitive path.“Bringing a dying language back to life”by Brigid O’RourkeThrough Harvard’s Project Teach program, an instructor is teaching seventh-graders the origin of the Gullah language.,“Mourning Devah Pager”by Jill RadskenHarvard mourned the loss of Devah Pager, an academic “force of nature,” remembered for her trailblazing scholarship and extraordinary mentorship.,From the LabThese were the stories that explored the world around us and the mysteries within us“When science meets mindfulness”by Alvin PowellThe first in a series that looked at the expanding research on mindfulness and stress.,“How fast can we run?”by Alvin PowellThe chair of the Department of Human Evolutionary Biology discussed the body’s triumphs and limits.“Microbes by the mile”by Deborah BlackwellHarvard researchers shared the beauty of the microscopic world.,“Five healthy habits to live by”by Karen FeldscherHarvard Chan researchers looked at over 25 years of data to get a better idea of which habits are the healthiest.,“Songs in the key of humanity”by Peter ReuellA Harvard study questioned whether music is more universal than we previously thought.,The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. Top stories of 2016 Looking back at some of our most-read articles of the yearlast_img read more

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HBO Sets Premiere Date for Bryan Cranston-Led All the Way

first_img Hot on the heels of Mama Broadway, the HBO film adaptation of All the Way will premiere on May 21. Headlined by Bryan Cranston, reprising his Tony-winning role of Lyndon B. Johnson, the film will also star Tony winner and Oscar nominee Frank Langella as Senator Richard Russell. Jay Roach directs the small screen take on the drama by Robert Schenkkan, which won the 2014 Tony for Best Play.In addition to Cranston and Langella, the movie will feature Bradley Whitford (another familiar face to White House dramas) as Hubert Humphrey, Melissa Leo as Lady Bird Johnson and Anthony Mackie as Martin Luther King Jr.Pulitzer Prize winner Schenkkan penned the screenplay. The show begins with the Kennedy assassination and details the first year of Johnson’s presidency, focusing on his involvement with the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Bryan Cranston in ‘All the Way'(Photo by Evgenia Eliseeva) View Commentslast_img read more

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Appalachian shale producer EQT Corp. may take $1.8 billion fourth quarter charge

first_imgAppalachian shale producer EQT Corp. may take $1.8 billion fourth quarter charge FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Natural Gas Intelligence:EQT Corp. said in a regulatory filing on Monday it may incur a steep one-time impairment of up to $1.8 billion for the fourth quarter due to a new development plan and low natural gas prices.Under a new management team that took over last July, the nation’s largest natural gas producer is aiming to aggressively cut debt and realign operations to boost performance and value. Management has outlined plans to cut debt by $1.5 billion by mid-2020, which it expects to achieve with a mix of initiatives, including asset sales.The monetization, along with a decrease in the value of its reserves and the writedown of unproven properties no longer in the development plan, is likely to result in a 4Q2019 impairment of $1.4-1.8 billion, the company said in a Form 8-K filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. The figure could change as year-end results are finalized.Fourth quarter production is expected to average 370-375 Bcfe, or toward the high-end of previously announced guidance, according to preliminary estimates. The company produced 394 Bcfe in the year-ago period and 381 Bcfe in 3Q2019. It is guiding for 1.45-1.50 Tcfe of production this year, roughly flat to 2019 levels.Averaged realized prices are also expected to average $2.51-2.56/Mcfe in 4Q2019, or below the 4Q2018 average of $3.13/Mcfe.EQT also said Monday it would offer two new series of fixed rate senior notes. Moody’s Investors Service downgraded the company following Monday’s filing.[Jamison Cocklin]More: Appalachian heavyweight EQT warns of $1B-plus impairment for fourth quarterlast_img read more

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